GOP rep to introduce bill to curtail Trump's trade powers
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Rep. Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John GallagherOvernight Defense: Details on defense spending bill | NATO chief dismisses talk of renaming HQ for McCain | North Korea warns US over cyber allegations NATO head shoots down idea of naming new headquarters after McCain Overnight Defense: Officials rush to deny writing anonymous op-ed | Lawmakers offer measure on naming NATO headquarters after McCain | US, India sign deal on sharing intel MORE (R-Wis.) is slated to introduce a bill on Monday that would limit President TrumpDonald John TrumpLondon terror suspect’s children told authorities he complained about Trump: inquiry The Memo: Tide turns on Kavanaugh Trump to nominate retiring lawmaker as head of trade agency MORE's authority to impose certain tariffs.

Under the legislation, the president would be required to obtain congressional approval before levying tariffs "in the interest of national security."

Lawmakers would be provided with a 60-day window to review the president's proposals. Legislation aimed at approving the requests would also have the ability to be fast-tracked through both chambers, ensuring an opportunity for debate and passage.

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The measure — which already has a companion bill introduced by Republican Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips Corker GOP senator: Kavanaugh accuser 'moving the goalposts' Grassley willing to send staff to California to speak with Kavanaugh accuser Corker blasts Trump's 'ready, fire, aim' trade policy MORE (Tenn.) and Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyOvernight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns Top GOP candidate drops out of Ohio Senate race MORE (Pa.) that has garnered bipartisan support — would be retroactive for the past two years and apply to all tariffs that fall under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962.

The Senate version of the legislation has received strong pushback from the White House, with Trump urging Corker not to move forward with the bill.

The introduction in the House comes amid Republicans' concern over Trump's decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum with three of the U.S.'s largest trading partners —the European Union, Canada and Mexico — in an attempt to negotiate better trade deals. The administration also recently imposed a 25 percent tariff on roughly $34 billion of Chinese imports.

Critics of Trump's call for higher tariffs fear a trade war would be detrimental to the country's economy and foreign relations.