GOP rep to introduce bill to curtail Trump's trade powers
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Rep. Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John GallagherChina denies it tested missile, says it was space vehicle Biden slips further back to failed China policies Lawmakers using leadership PACs as 'slush funds' to live lavish lifestyles: report MORE (R-Wis.) is slated to introduce a bill on Monday that would limit President TrumpDonald TrumpHillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — Twitter's algorithm boosts right-leaning content, internal study finds Ohio Democrat calls Vance an 'ass----' over Baldwin tweet Matt Taibbi says Trump's rhetoric caused public perception of US intelligence services to shift MORE's authority to impose certain tariffs.

Under the legislation, the president would be required to obtain congressional approval before levying tariffs "in the interest of national security."

Lawmakers would be provided with a 60-day window to review the president's proposals. Legislation aimed at approving the requests would also have the ability to be fast-tracked through both chambers, ensuring an opportunity for debate and passage.

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The measure — which already has a companion bill introduced by Republican Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (Tenn.) and Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.) that has garnered bipartisan support — would be retroactive for the past two years and apply to all tariffs that fall under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962.

The Senate version of the legislation has received strong pushback from the White House, with Trump urging Corker not to move forward with the bill.

The introduction in the House comes amid Republicans' concern over Trump's decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum with three of the U.S.'s largest trading partners —the European Union, Canada and Mexico — in an attempt to negotiate better trade deals. The administration also recently imposed a 25 percent tariff on roughly $34 billion of Chinese imports.

Critics of Trump's call for higher tariffs fear a trade war would be detrimental to the country's economy and foreign relations.