Seven Republicans voted Tuesday against legislation to name a post office after Rep. Louise SlaughterDorothy (Louise) Louise SlaughterDemocrats must go on the offensive against voter suppression House passes bill to explicitly ban insider trading Sotomayor, Angela Davis formally inducted into National Women's Hall of Fame MORE (D-N.Y.).

The legislation to name the Louise and Bob Slaughter Post Office was approved in a 414-7 vote. Bob Slaughter, the lawmaker's husband, died in 2014.

The Republicans voting "no" were Reps. Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Calls mount to start transition as Biden readies Cabinet picks Hillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones House approves measure condemning QAnon, but 17 Republicans vote against it MORE (Texas), Glenn GrothmanGlenn S. GrothmanPolitical fireworks fuel DC statehood hearing Plaskett slams GOP rep for saying Black Lives Matter 'doesn't like the old-fashioned family' House Oversight requests Secret Service briefing on threats of extremist violence in wake of Capitol riot MORE (Wis.), Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisGOP doctors in Congress release video urging people to get vaccinated Heated argument erupts after Rep. Mondaire Jones calls GOP objections to DC statehood 'racist trash' Conservative House members call on Senate to oppose ATF nominee MORE (Md.), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieOvernight Health Care: WHO-backed Covax gets a boost from Moderna Vaccine hesitancy among lawmakers slows return to normalcy on Capitol Hill Gaetz, House Republicans introduce bill to defund Postal Service covert operations program MORE (Ky.), Tom RiceHugh (Tom) Thompson RiceRepublicans who backed Trump impeachment see fundraising boost Trump doubles down on endorsement of South Carolina GOP chair Forget Trump's behavior — let's focus on the GOP and America's future MORE (SC), David RouzerDavid Cheston RouzerWe can't let sand mining threaten storm-buffering, natural infrastructure READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Trump visits swing-state North Carolina on 75th anniversary of WWII's end MORE and Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyFive takeaways on the House's return to budget earmarks Hillicon Valley: Tech companies duke it out at Senate hearing | Seven House Republicans vow to reject donations from Big Tech Seven House Republicans vow to reject donations from Big Tech MORE (Texas).

Slaughter had served as the top Democrat on the House Rules Committee before dying in March 2018 at the age of 88. She had served 31 years in the House. 

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Massie cited his belief there are others who have who deserve recognition more than elected officials as his reasoning for voting no.

“There are so many unrecognized veterans who have sacrificed for this country that I think it is wrong to name a federal facility after a politician,” Massie told The Hill in a statement.

Roy echoed Massie’s sentiments on the matter.

“While I didn’t know Rep. Slaughter or her husband, I am sure they were fine, patriotic people dedicated to public service,” Roy, a freshman member, said in a statement. “I don’t think politicians should be spending valuable time naming post offices after other politicians.”

Harris also said it was wrong to name post offices after members of Congress — unless the member was a war hero.

“We shouldn’t name post offices after congressional families unless the Member of Congress was a war hero,” he said in a statement. 

Rep. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsTrump denies Gaetz asked him for blanket pardon Gaetz, on the ropes, finds few friends in GOP Schumer to recommend three Black lawyers to head US attorney offices in NY MORE (R-N.Y.), one of the 11 members who did not vote on the measure, was the only member of the New York delegation to decline to cosponsor the bill. Slaughter had called for the Office of Congressional Ethics to investigate insider trading allegations against Collins that ultimately led to his indictment, Roll Call first reported.