Seven Republicans voted Tuesday against legislation to name a post office after Rep. Louise SlaughterDorothy (Louise) Louise SlaughterSeven Republicans vote against naming post office after ex-Rep. Louise Slaughter Breaking through the boys club Sotomayor, Jane Fonda inducted into National Women's Hall of Fame MORE (D-N.Y.).

The legislation to name the Louise and Bob Slaughter Post Office was approved in a 414-7 vote. Bob Slaughter, the lawmaker's husband, died in 2014.

The Republicans voting "no" were Reps. Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresOvernight Energy: GOP lawmaker parodies Green New Deal in new bill | House Republicans accuse Dems of ramming through climate bill | Park Service chief grilled over shutdown House Republicans accuse Dems of ramming through climate bill Seven Republicans vote against naming post office after ex-Rep. Louise Slaughter MORE (Texas), Glenn GrothmanGlenn S. Grothman58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill GOP lawmaker: Trump 'not quite popular enough' to advance an immigration bill Republicans offer 'free market alternative' to paid family leave MORE (Wis.), Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter Harris58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill Overnight Defense — Presented by Huntington Ingalls Industries — Trump nominates Shanahan as Pentagon chief | House panel advances bill to block military funds for border wall | Trump defends Bolton despite differences House panel advances bill to block military construction funds for border wall MORE (Md.), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieThis week: Democrats move funding bills as caps deal remains elusive This week: Democrats move funding bills as caps deal remains elusive House conservative's procedural protest met with bipartisan gripes MORE (Ky.), Tom RiceHugh (Tom) Thompson RiceThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump struggles to replicate 2016 coalition The Hill's Morning Report - Trump struggles to replicate 2016 coalition Nonagenarian D-Day veterans recreate parachute drops over Normandy MORE (SC), David RouzerDavid Cheston RouzerThirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill Seven Republicans vote against naming post office after ex-Rep. Louise Slaughter Bold, bipartisan action on child care will win plenty of friends MORE and Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyThis week: Democrats move funding bills as caps deal remains elusive This week: Democrats move funding bills as caps deal remains elusive On The Money: Pelosi says no debt ceiling hike until deal on spending caps | McConnell pressures White House to strike budget deal | Warren bill would wipe out billions in student debt | Senate passes IRS reform bill MORE (Texas).

Slaughter had served as the top Democrat on the House Rules Committee before dying in March 2018 at the age of 88. She had served 31 years in the House. 

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Massie cited his belief there are others who have who deserve recognition more than elected officials as his reasoning for voting no.

“There are so many unrecognized veterans who have sacrificed for this country that I think it is wrong to name a federal facility after a politician,” Massie told The Hill in a statement.

Roy echoed Massie’s sentiments on the matter.

“While I didn’t know Rep. Slaughter or her husband, I am sure they were fine, patriotic people dedicated to public service,” Roy, a freshman member, said in a statement. “I don’t think politicians should be spending valuable time naming post offices after other politicians.”

Harris also said it was wrong to name post offices after members of Congress — unless the member was a war hero.

“We shouldn’t name post offices after congressional families unless the Member of Congress was a war hero,” he said in a statement. 

Rep. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsMichael Caputo eyes congressional bid House ethics panel renews probes into three GOP lawmakers The Hill's Morning Report - Barr stiff-arms House following Senate grilling MORE (R-N.Y.), one of the 11 members who did not vote on the measure, was the only member of the New York delegation to decline to cosponsor the bill. Slaughter had called for the Office of Congressional Ethics to investigate insider trading allegations against Collins that ultimately led to his indictment, Roll Call first reported.