Seven Republicans voted Tuesday against legislation to name a post office after Rep. Louise SlaughterDorothy (Louise) Louise SlaughterHouse passes bill to explicitly ban insider trading Sotomayor, Angela Davis formally inducted into National Women's Hall of Fame Seven Republicans vote against naming post office after ex-Rep. Louise Slaughter MORE (D-N.Y.).

The legislation to name the Louise and Bob Slaughter Post Office was approved in a 414-7 vote. Bob Slaughter, the lawmaker's husband, died in 2014.

The Republicans voting "no" were Reps. Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresDemocrats push to end confidentiality for oil companies that don't add ethanol The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren, Sanders overtake Biden in third-quarter fundraising The Hill's Morning Report — Trump broadens call for Biden probes MORE (Texas), Glenn GrothmanGlenn S. GrothmanInterest rate caps are popular — for good reason GOP moves to block provision banning use of Defense funds for border wall 58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill MORE (Wis.), Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisConservative lawmakers warn Pelosi about 'rate-setting' surprise billing fix Overnight Defense: Trump clashes with Macron at NATO summit | House impeachment report says Trump abused power | Top Dem scolds military leaders on Trump intervention in war crimes cases House conservatives attempt to access closed-door impeachment hearing MORE (Md.), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieOvernight Energy: Green groups to sue over Trump rollback of Obama water rules | GOP climate plan faces pushback from right | Bezos launches B climate initiative GOP climate plan faces pushback — from Republicans Overnight Defense: House passes bills to rein in Trump on Iran | Pentagon seeks Iraq's permission to deploy missile defenses | Roberts refuses to read Paul question on whistleblower during impeachment trial MORE (Ky.), Tom RiceHugh (Tom) Thompson RiceHouse GOP scores rare floor victory by outmaneuvering Democrats on tax bill Providing more information on the prescription drug supply chain will help lower costs for all On The Money: Lawmakers hammer Zuckerberg over Facebook controversies | GOP chair expects another funding stopgap | Senate rejects Dem measure on SALT deduction cap workarounds MORE (SC), David RouzerDavid Cheston RouzerNorth Carolina poised to pass new congressional maps North Carolina ruling could cost GOP House seats Thirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill MORE and Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyGun control group plans to spend million in Texas in 2020 'Medicare for All' will turn into health care for none The advantage of paying for medical care directly MORE (Texas).

Slaughter had served as the top Democrat on the House Rules Committee before dying in March 2018 at the age of 88. She had served 31 years in the House. 

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Massie cited his belief there are others who have who deserve recognition more than elected officials as his reasoning for voting no.

“There are so many unrecognized veterans who have sacrificed for this country that I think it is wrong to name a federal facility after a politician,” Massie told The Hill in a statement.

Roy echoed Massie’s sentiments on the matter.

“While I didn’t know Rep. Slaughter or her husband, I am sure they were fine, patriotic people dedicated to public service,” Roy, a freshman member, said in a statement. “I don’t think politicians should be spending valuable time naming post offices after other politicians.”

Harris also said it was wrong to name post offices after members of Congress — unless the member was a war hero.

“We shouldn’t name post offices after congressional families unless the Member of Congress was a war hero,” he said in a statement. 

Rep. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsFormer Rep. Chris Collins sentenced to 2 years in prison for insider trading GOP leaders encourage retiring lawmakers to give up committee posts Democrats running to replace Duncan Hunter, Chris Collins vow to support ethics package MORE (R-N.Y.), one of the 11 members who did not vote on the measure, was the only member of the New York delegation to decline to cosponsor the bill. Slaughter had called for the Office of Congressional Ethics to investigate insider trading allegations against Collins that ultimately led to his indictment, Roll Call first reported.