This week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpWHCA calls on Trump to denounce video depicting him shooting media outlets Video of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Trump hits Fox News's Chris Wallace over Ukraine coverage MORE will head to Capitol Hill this week to meet with Senate Republicans.

Trump is set to attend the closed-door caucus lunch on Tuesday, the first time in months that he’s attended the Senate GOP meeting.

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoTo stave off a recession, let's pass a transportation infrastructure bill Overnight Defense: GOP wary of action on Iran | Pence says US 'locked and loaded' to defend allies | Iran's leader rules out talks with US GOP senator: Iran is behind attack on Saudi Arabia MORE (R-Wyo.), the chairman of the Senate Republican Policy Committee, said lawmakers will discuss the economy with Trump, as well as recent developments in North Korea.

“Our conference looks forward to discussing the key accomplishments of tax cuts and historic economic growth here at home, and the opportunity for peace on the Korean Peninsula that lies ahead," he said in a statement.

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Trump has had an at times rocky relationship with the Senate GOP caucus.

His first caucus lunch in 2016 went off the rails after he got into a heated spat with GOP Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeHow to survive an impeachment Are Senate Republicans certain that Trump can return to office? Jeff Flake calls Trump's language 'authoritarian' MORE (Ariz.) and criticized Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSenators take fundraising efforts to Nats playoff games On The Money: Fed officials saw rising risk of recession | Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz blast NBA for 'outrageous' response to China | Prospects dim for trade breakthrough with China Ocasio-Cortez, Ted Cruz join colleagues blasting NBA for 'outrageous' response to China MORE (R-Neb.) and then-Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkGOP senator says he doesn't remember signing 2016 letter urging 'reform' of Ukraine prosecutor's office The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Advocates push for EpiPens on flights after college student's mid-flight allergic reaction MORE (R-Ill.).

Trump attended a caucus lunch again in October 2017. A protester threw Russian flags at the president and Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFurious Republicans prepare to rebuke Trump on Syria Republicans wrestle with impeachment strategy Mattis warns 'ISIS will resurge' without U.S. pressure on Syria MORE (R-Ky.) as they entered the lunch in a move that ultimately resulted in new restrictions on press access in the Capitol.

The president characterized the meeting as "a love fest with standing ovations and great ideas for USA!"

After that October lunch, Flake, who has been a frequent critic of Trump, announced that he was retiring at the end of his current term.

Tuesday’s meeting comes as McConnell is under growing pressure to cancel, or at least delay, the August recess if the Senate isn’t finished passing government funding bills or caught up on nominations.

More than a dozen GOP senators sent a letter to McConnell late last week urging him to cancel the monthlong recess or keep the Senate in for longer work weeks to avoid passing another mammoth omnibus funding bill.

“We stand ready to work Mondays and Fridays, nights as well as weekends, to ensure the funding process is not used to jam the president with a bad spending deal,” they wrote in the letter.

Trump seized on the idea over the weekend and demanded that any government funding bill include money for border security and the controversial U.S.-Mexico border wall.

"The Senate should get funding done before the August break, or NOT GO HOME,” Trump tweeted. “Wall and Border Security should be included. Also waiting for approval of almost 300 nominations, worst in history. Democrats are doing everything possible to obstruct, all they know how to do. STAY!"

Farm bill

The House is slated to take up a controversial farm bill this week, with lawmakers split over provisions related to sugar subsidies and work requirements for food stamps.

GOP leadership is still working on whipping the measure, with House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayIntelligence watchdog huddles with members as impeachment push grows What's causing the congressional 'Texodus'? Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (R-Texas) telling The Hill Thursday they were just short of the 218 votes needed to send the legislation to the upper chamber.

Passing the bill is a top priority for House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAmash: Trump incorrect in claiming Congress didn't subpoena Obama officials Democrats hit Scalia over LGBTQ rights Three-way clash set to dominate Democratic debate MORE (R-Wis.), as it contains elements to reform the welfare system.

The five-year legislation authorizes multiple farm, agricultural and food programs that expire at the end of September.

But changes in funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps, have sparked infighting among Republicans. This year’s farm bill would impose tougher work requirements on millions of food stamp recipients and shift the program’s funding toward job training.

Moderates are worried the new work requirements are too tough while conservatives are bristling because they believe they don’t go far enough.

Haspel

Acting CIA Director Gina Haspel is continuing to hunt for votes as Republicans race to confirm her to lead the spy agency before the Memorial Day recess.

The Senate Intelligence Committee, which hasn't publicly announced a time, is expected to vote on her nomination as soon as this week.

Every Republican on the panel, as well as Democratic Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies Trump pushed for her ouster GOP requests update on criminal referrals prompted by 2018 Kavanaugh probe Fallout from Kavanaugh confirmation felt in Washington one year later MORE (W.Va.), is expected to vote for her in committee, which will give her enough support for her nomination to head to the Senate floor.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenators take fundraising efforts to Nats playoff games Senate Intelligence report triggers new calls for action on election security Senate Intel report urges action to prevent Russian meddling in 2020 election MORE (D-Va.), the vice chairman of the committee, is considered an influential vote and has yet to say if he will support Haspel.

Haspel has homed in on red- and purple-state Democrats as she looks to lock down the vote, as well as bolster what is expected to be a thin margin on the Senate floor.

She met with Democratic Sens. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyWatchdog accuses pro-Kavanaugh group of sending illegal robotexts in 2018 Lobbying world Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (Ind.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampThe Hill's Morning Report — Biden steadies in third debate as top tier remains the same Trump wins 60 percent approval in rural areas of key states Pence to push new NAFTA deal in visit to Iowa MORE (N.D.) and Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael Kaine2020 general election debates announced Senators call for Trump administration to testify on Syria Schumer: Transcript 'absolutely validates' Trump impeachment inquiry MORE (Va.) last week and is scheduled to meet with Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonBottom Line Bottom Line Media and candidates should be ashamed that they don't talk about obesity MORE (D-Fla.) this week.

Haspel is a CIA veteran but her nomination is considered controversial because of her involvement in the Bush-era “enhanced interrogation” — now widely considered torture — program, running a CIA black site and the destruction of videotapes that show the waterboarding of an al Qaeda suspect.

But she appears likely to be confirmed after Donnelly and Manchin, both up for reelection in states Trump won handedly in 2016, said they would support her.

GOP Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand Paul calls for probe of Democrats over Ukraine letter Sunday Show Preview: Trump's allies and administration defend decision on Syria Ana Navarro clashes with Rand Paul in fiery exchange: 'Don't mansplain!' MORE (Ky.) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainVideo of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Remembering leaders who put country above party Graham-Trump rollercoaster hits dizzying speed MORE (Ariz.) have said they will oppose Haspel. McCain has been absent from Washington for months as he battles brain cancer and has not indicated he will return to the Senate to vote against Haspel’s nomination.

Several other key lawmakers, including GOP Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGOP requests update on criminal referrals prompted by 2018 Kavanaugh probe McConnell warns Trump against withdrawing troops from Syria The American people deserve a debate about Ukrainian military aid MORE (Utah) and Flake, remain on the fence.

Judicial nominations

The Senate is continuing to grind through Trump’s appeals court picks at a record pace.

Senators confirmed two judicial nominees last week, with four more circuit nominations teed up for this week.

Senators will vote on Michael Scudder and Amy St. Eve to serve on the 7th Circuit on Monday evening.

They’ll then vote on Joel Carson III to be a judge on the 10th Circuit and John Nalbandian to be judge for the 6th Circuit on Tuesday at noon.

The votes will give Trump a total of 21 circuit picks confirmed so far during his tenure. That’s more than former Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, Reagan and Carter got confirmed during their first two years.

It also puts Trump on track to break the record for the number of circuit court picks confirmed during a president’s first two years, which is currently held by former President George H.W. Bush, with 22.

Melanie Zanona contributed.