Lawmakers are returning to Washington for the start of the 116th Congress with no end in sight to the partial government shutdown.

Though the new session doesn’t start until Thursday, the Senate is expected to return on Wednesday afternoon — the last day Republicans will control both chambers. The House has yet to flesh out any plans before Thursday, but outgoing GOP leadership is giving members 24 hours notice before any vote.

But with no signs of movement toward an agreement to fully reopen the government since Congress missed the Dec. 21 deadline, any progress is likely to wait until at least Thursday. Lawmakers and administration say they are not close to a deal that would fund roughly 25 percent of the federal government, including the Department of Homeland Security.

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Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbySenate GOP braces for impeachment trial 'roller coaster' McConnell tees up government funding votes amid stalemate GOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' MORE (R-Ala.), the chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, warned on Sunday that the partial shutdown “could last a long, long time” and that the negotiations are “at an impasse at the moment.”

“At the end of the day, all of this will end. We don't know when, in negotiations. It's not a question of who wins or loses. Nobody's going to win this kind of game. Nobody wins in a shutdown. We all lose and we kind of look silly,” Shelby told CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

The administration has tried to shift the blame to Democrats, including playing up the idea of a split between members of Democratic leadership. Trump, in a tweet over the weekend, said that he was in “White House waiting for the Democrats to come on over and make a deal on Border Security.”

But Trump — who said earlier this month that he would accept the “mantle” of a shutdown — also indicated late last week and over the weekend that Republicans were using the “hard way,” a shutdown, to try to get the wall funding, and that he believed the fight will benefit him in his 2020 campaign.

“For those that naively ask why didn’t the Republicans get approval to build the Wall over the last year, it is because IN THE SENATE WE NEED 10 DEMOCRAT VOTES, and they will gives us ‘NONE’ for Border Security! Now we have to do it the hard way, with a Shutdown. Too bad,” Trump said in a tweet on Saturday.

Trump separately said in a tweet late last week that Democrats “may have the 10 Senate votes, but we have the issue, Border Security. 2020!”

The crux of the entrenched stalemate on funding part of the government is money for Trump’s U.S.-Mexico border wall. Trump has demanded $5 billion for the wall, an amount approved by House Republicans earlier this month.

But that amount is dead on arrival in the Senate. Trump and Republicans will lose control a key source of leverage on Thursday when Democrats take back control of the House.

House Democrats will likely quickly take up a clean continuing resolution (CR) to reopen the government, as House Democratic Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCummings to lie in state at the Capitol House Republicans 'demand the release of the rules' on impeachment Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union —Dem wants more changes to Pelosi drug pricing bill | Ebola outbreak wanes, but funding lags | Johnson & Johnson recalls batch of baby powder after asbestos traces found MORE (Calif.) is expected to take back the Speaker's gavel.

Incoming Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) is reportedly telling members that they are “expected to be present and voting” on Jan. 3 on government funding legislation. A spokesman for Pelosi pledged in a recent tweet that Democrats would “act swiftly to end the Trump Shutdown” and advocate for a policy that includes “strong and smart border security.”

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The floor drama will be the first chance for the new House majority to flex their political muscles after attempts by Democratic lawmakers to force votes on funding legislation that did not include funding for Trump’s border wall were blocked by GOP leadership over the holidays.

House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerHouse Republicans 'demand the release of the rules' on impeachment Scalise, Cole introduce resolution to change rules on impeachment Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg defends handling of misinformation in political ads | Biden camp hits Zuckerberg over remarks | Dem bill would jail tech execs for lying about privacy | Consumer safety agency accidentally disclosed personal data MORE (D-Md.) noted that they tried to offer a Senate-passed stopgap bill to fund part of the government through Feb. 8 but were blocked, adding that Democrats had “already compromised” on the border.

“These are the Republican — they're in the majority — their bills and we're willing to vote to fund them at the Senate-passed bill levels … [Speaker] Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAmash: Trump incorrect in claiming Congress didn't subpoena Obama officials Democrats hit Scalia over LGBTQ rights Three-way clash set to dominate Democratic debate MORE [R-Wis.] refused to put it on the floor... [Republicans] have got a history of using the shutdown of government as a strategy to get what they want. We are fully prepared to support the bill that came over from the Senate," Hoyer said.

Passing either a short-term continuing resolution or a larger bill to fund the remaining 25 percent of the federal government through Sept. 30, the end of the 2019 fiscal year, would kick the fight back to the Senate.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell: Trump's troop pull back in Syria a 'grave strategic mistake' Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Trump insists Turkey wants cease-fire | Fighting continues in Syrian town | Pentagon chief headed to Mideast | Mattis responds to criticism from Trump TSA head rules himself out for top DHS job   MORE (R-Ky.) has publicly taken a back seat in the shutdown fight, arguing in the wake of the partial closure that working out an agreement was between Trump, whose signature they need, and Democrats, whose votes are needed.

But if the House was able to pass a bill it would add new political pressure on McConnell, who has warned repeatedly against shutting down the government. But moving a bill that didn’t have Trump’s support would open up himself and other Republican senators to attacks from the mercurial president.

McConnell has hinted Trump’s support is needed for a vote in the Republican-controlled Senate. And GOP senators say they think it’s unlikely the chamber would move forward on a bill without the president, after Trump caught them flat-footed earlier this month when he rejected the Senate-passed CR.

“I think Sen. McConnell our leader has already addressed that. That said that he would not even take up the bill until he found some compromise that the president would agree to sign. So we're going to be at an impasse. That would be probably an empty gesture, but that goes on in Washington every day,” Shelby said, asked what would happen if the House passed the bill early next month.

Democrats have warned that $1.3 billion is their cap on negotiations and that it would go toward fencing, not a concrete wall. Outgoing White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE told the Los Angeles Times that the administration had moved away from the concept of a literal wall early in the Trump administration.

Speaker vote

Pelosi is expected to be voted in as the next Speaker on Thursday.

The California Democrat secured the 218 votes needed on the floor after striking a deal with a group of rebel Democrats — led by Reps. Seth MoultonSeth Moulton2020 Presidential Candidates Rep. Joe Kennedy has history on his side in Senate bid Mass shootings have hit 158 House districts so far this year MORE (Mass.), Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden camp faces new challenges Third-quarter fundraising sets Sanders, Warren, Buttigieg apart The Hill's 12:30 Report: Hunter Biden speaks out amid Ukraine controversy MORE (Ohio) and Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceMarijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis Pelosi backers feel vindicated after tumultuous stretch Democrat offers measure to prevent lawmakers from sleeping in their offices MORE (N.Y.), Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterFinancial sector's work on SAFE Banking Act shows together, everyone achieves more House passes bill to protect cannabis industry access to banks, credit unions Showing consumers health care pricing could lower costs MORE (Colo.), Bill FosterGeorge (Bill) William FosterMass shootings have hit 158 House districts so far this year EPA head dodges questions about environmental action against San Francisco House Democrats blur lines on support for impeachment MORE (Ill.) and Linda Sánchez (Calif.) — ensuring she would term-limit herself out of her leadership role. Under the deal Pelosi would step aside as Speaker by 2022.

Pelosi won the nomination for Speaker in caucus in late November in a 203-32 secret-ballot vote. The margin would have been enough to block her from becoming Speaker, but the House Democratic leader has worked furiously to lock down support, cut deals and pick off floated opponents.

Upwards of a dozen Democrats have vowed not to support Pelosi on the floor, including incoming freshman Reps. Max RoseMax RoseHillicon Valley: FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Dems wrangle over breaking up Big Tech at debate | Critics pounce as Facebook's Libra stumbles | Zuckerberg to be interviewed by Fox News | Twitter details rules for political figures' tweets Democratic lawmakers press for white supremacist groups to be labeled foreign terrorist organizations Bottom Line MORE (N.Y.), Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerHouse Dems introduce bill to fight social media disinformation Bipartisan lawmakers who visited Syrian border slam Trump's 'rash decision' Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry MORE (Va.), Joe CunninghamJoseph CunninghamDemocratic lawmaker fires back after NRCC mocks him for getting marriage counseling Here are the House Democrats who aren't backing Trump impeachment inquiry Here are the Democrats who aren't co-sponsoring an assault weapons ban MORE (S.C.) and Ben McAdams (Utah). Pelosi can afford to lose 17 votes on the floor.

New members sworn in

New members in both the House and Senate are slated to be sworn in on Jan. 3, eight in the Senate and 100 non-incumbent winners in the lower chamber. Sixty-three of the new House members are Democrats.

Senate Republicans, who are expanding their majority from 51 to 53 seats, will swear in six new members including former GOP presidential nominee Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTrump knocks Romney as 'Democrat secret asset' in new video Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Trump insists Turkey wants cease-fire | Fighting continues in Syrian town | Pentagon chief headed to Mideast | Mattis responds to criticism from Trump Fighting continues in Syrian town despite cease-fire deal MORE and Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyThe Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren Schumer seeks focus on health care amid impeachment fever Trump-GOP tensions over Syria show signs of easing MORE (R-Ariz.), who lost her Senate bid in November but was appointed to the seat formerly held by Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainCummings to lie in state at the Capitol Elizabeth Warren should concern Donald Trump 'bigly' Lawmakers toast Greta Van Susteren's new show MORE (R-Ariz.). Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) is delaying his swearing in until Friday.

Sens.-elect Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Senators introduce legislation to boost cyber defense training in high school Key endorsements: A who's who in early states MORE (D-Nev.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), who flipped seats previously held by Republicans, will also be sworn in.

Pelosi canceled her planned new member reception scheduled at the National Building Museum in the wake of the shutdown, Politico first reported.