Lawmakers are returning to Washington for the start of the 116th Congress with no end in sight to the partial government shutdown.

Though the new session doesn’t start until Thursday, the Senate is expected to return on Wednesday afternoon — the last day Republicans will control both chambers. The House has yet to flesh out any plans before Thursday, but outgoing GOP leadership is giving members 24 hours notice before any vote.

But with no signs of movement toward an agreement to fully reopen the government since Congress missed the Dec. 21 deadline, any progress is likely to wait until at least Thursday. Lawmakers and administration say they are not close to a deal that would fund roughly 25 percent of the federal government, including the Department of Homeland Security.

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Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig Shelby20 Dems demand no more money for ICE agents, Trump wall Conservatives urge Trump to stick with Moore for Fed Poll: Roy Moore leading Alabama GOP field MORE (R-Ala.), the chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, warned on Sunday that the partial shutdown “could last a long, long time” and that the negotiations are “at an impasse at the moment.”

“At the end of the day, all of this will end. We don't know when, in negotiations. It's not a question of who wins or loses. Nobody's going to win this kind of game. Nobody wins in a shutdown. We all lose and we kind of look silly,” Shelby told CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

The administration has tried to shift the blame to Democrats, including playing up the idea of a split between members of Democratic leadership. Trump, in a tweet over the weekend, said that he was in “White House waiting for the Democrats to come on over and make a deal on Border Security.”

But Trump — who said earlier this month that he would accept the “mantle” of a shutdown — also indicated late last week and over the weekend that Republicans were using the “hard way,” a shutdown, to try to get the wall funding, and that he believed the fight will benefit him in his 2020 campaign.

“For those that naively ask why didn’t the Republicans get approval to build the Wall over the last year, it is because IN THE SENATE WE NEED 10 DEMOCRAT VOTES, and they will gives us ‘NONE’ for Border Security! Now we have to do it the hard way, with a Shutdown. Too bad,” Trump said in a tweet on Saturday.

Trump separately said in a tweet late last week that Democrats “may have the 10 Senate votes, but we have the issue, Border Security. 2020!”

The crux of the entrenched stalemate on funding part of the government is money for Trump’s U.S.-Mexico border wall. Trump has demanded $5 billion for the wall, an amount approved by House Republicans earlier this month.

But that amount is dead on arrival in the Senate. Trump and Republicans will lose control a key source of leverage on Thursday when Democrats take back control of the House.

House Democrats will likely quickly take up a clean continuing resolution (CR) to reopen the government, as House Democratic Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiDemocrats are playing voters on their fantasies for impeachment The Hill's Morning Report - Trump tells House investigators 'no' Seven big decisions facing Biden in 2020 primary MORE (Calif.) is expected to take back the Speaker's gavel.

Incoming Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) is reportedly telling members that they are “expected to be present and voting” on Jan. 3 on government funding legislation. A spokesman for Pelosi pledged in a recent tweet that Democrats would “act swiftly to end the Trump Shutdown” and advocate for a policy that includes “strong and smart border security.”

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The floor drama will be the first chance for the new House majority to flex their political muscles after attempts by Democratic lawmakers to force votes on funding legislation that did not include funding for Trump’s border wall were blocked by GOP leadership over the holidays.

House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerDems charge ahead on immigration Julián Castro: Trump should be impeached for trying to obstruct justice 'in very concrete ways' Dems seek to rein in calls for impeachment MORE (D-Md.) noted that they tried to offer a Senate-passed stopgap bill to fund part of the government through Feb. 8 but were blocked, adding that Democrats had “already compromised” on the border.

“These are the Republican — they're in the majority — their bills and we're willing to vote to fund them at the Senate-passed bill levels … [Speaker] Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAppeals court rules House chaplain can reject secular prayers FEC filing: No individuals donated to indicted GOP rep this cycle The Hill's Morning Report - Waiting on Mueller: Answers come on Thursday MORE [R-Wis.] refused to put it on the floor... [Republicans] have got a history of using the shutdown of government as a strategy to get what they want. We are fully prepared to support the bill that came over from the Senate," Hoyer said.

Passing either a short-term continuing resolution or a larger bill to fund the remaining 25 percent of the federal government through Sept. 30, the end of the 2019 fiscal year, would kick the fight back to the Senate.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellElection agency limps into 2020 cycle The Hill's Morning Report - Will Joe Biden's unifying strategy work? Dems charge ahead on immigration MORE (R-Ky.) has publicly taken a back seat in the shutdown fight, arguing in the wake of the partial closure that working out an agreement was between Trump, whose signature they need, and Democrats, whose votes are needed.

But if the House was able to pass a bill it would add new political pressure on McConnell, who has warned repeatedly against shutting down the government. But moving a bill that didn’t have Trump’s support would open up himself and other Republican senators to attacks from the mercurial president.

McConnell has hinted Trump’s support is needed for a vote in the Republican-controlled Senate. And GOP senators say they think it’s unlikely the chamber would move forward on a bill without the president, after Trump caught them flat-footed earlier this month when he rejected the Senate-passed CR.

“I think Sen. McConnell our leader has already addressed that. That said that he would not even take up the bill until he found some compromise that the president would agree to sign. So we're going to be at an impasse. That would be probably an empty gesture, but that goes on in Washington every day,” Shelby said, asked what would happen if the House passed the bill early next month.

Democrats have warned that $1.3 billion is their cap on negotiations and that it would go toward fencing, not a concrete wall. Outgoing White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE told the Los Angeles Times that the administration had moved away from the concept of a literal wall early in the Trump administration.

Speaker vote

Pelosi is expected to be voted in as the next Speaker on Thursday.

The California Democrat secured the 218 votes needed on the floor after striking a deal with a group of rebel Democrats — led by Reps. Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonMoulton: Dems 'made a mistake' waiting to discuss impeachment until now Khanna breaks with Sanders on voting rights for Boston Marathon bomber: 'I wouldn't go that far' Moulton disagrees with Sanders proposal to let inmates vote MORE (Mass.), Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John Ryan2020 Dems rebuke Trump on Iran, say they'd put US back in nuclear deal Where 2020 Democratic candidates stand on impeachment Warren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college MORE (Ohio) and Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceBooker takes early lead in 2020 endorsements New York Rep. Maloney endorses Gillibrand for president Hispanic Dems ask for multi-agency meeting on family separations MORE (N.Y.), Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterCongress can open financial institutions to legal cannabis industry with SAFE Banking Act 20 years after Columbine, Dems bullish on gun reform On The Money: Wells Fargo CEO steps down | Trump vows to keep funding for Special Olympics | House panel approves marijuana banking bill | Controversial Fed pick gains support in Senate MORE (Colo.), Bill FosterGeorge (Bill) William FosterPelosi joins other Dem leaders in support of Chicago Symphony Orchestra strikers This week: Shutdown showdown looms over new Congress Dem calls for closing lawmaker gym, sauna during shutdown MORE (Ill.) and Linda Sánchez (Calif.) — ensuring she would term-limit herself out of her leadership role. Under the deal Pelosi would step aside as Speaker by 2022.

Pelosi won the nomination for Speaker in caucus in late November in a 203-32 secret-ballot vote. The margin would have been enough to block her from becoming Speaker, but the House Democratic leader has worked furiously to lock down support, cut deals and pick off floated opponents.

Upwards of a dozen Democrats have vowed not to support Pelosi on the floor, including incoming freshman Reps. Max RoseMax RoseFreshman House Dems surge past GOP in money race McCarthy holds courtesy meeting with ex-Rep. Grimm Convicted Michael Grimm close to new House run: 'I'm 90 percent of the way there' MORE (N.Y.), Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerCorey Stewart to lead pro-Trump super PAC The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Why block citizenship to immigrants who defend America? MORE (Va.), Joe CunninghamJoseph CunninghamFreshman House Dems surge past GOP in money race The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Congressman blasts air horn at Trump official who said seismic air gun tests don't harm whales MORE (S.C.) and Ben McAdams (Utah). Pelosi can afford to lose 17 votes on the floor.

New members sworn in

New members in both the House and Senate are slated to be sworn in on Jan. 3, eight in the Senate and 100 non-incumbent winners in the lower chamber. Sixty-three of the new House members are Democrats.

Senate Republicans, who are expanding their majority from 51 to 53 seats, will swear in six new members including former GOP presidential nominee Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyBiden's sloppy launch may cost him Election agency limps into 2020 cycle Giuliani: Huckabee would have made 'an excellent president' MORE and Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyGOP Senate campaign arm hits battleground-state Dems over 'Medicare for All,' Green New Deal Senate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Trump gives nod to vulnerable GOP Sen. McSally with bill signing MORE (R-Ariz.), who lost her Senate bid in November but was appointed to the seat formerly held by Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainBiden's sloppy launch may cost him Cindy McCain weighs in on Biden report: 'No intention' of getting involved in race Why did Mueller allow his investigation to continue for two years? MORE (R-Ariz.). Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) is delaying his swearing in until Friday.

Sens.-elect Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHillicon Valley — Presented by CTIA and America's wireless industry — Prosecutors used FISA warrant to get info on Huawei | Study finds discrimination in Facebook ads | Bezos retains voting control over ex-wife's Amazon stocks More than 30 Senate Dems ask Trump to reconsider Central American aid cuts Dem senators introduce bill to combat sexual harassment in STEM MORE (D-Nev.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), who flipped seats previously held by Republicans, will also be sworn in.

Pelosi canceled her planned new member reception scheduled at the National Building Museum in the wake of the shutdown, Politico first reported.