Lawmakers are returning to Washington for the start of the 116th Congress with no end in sight to the partial government shutdown.

Though the new session doesn’t start until Thursday, the Senate is expected to return on Wednesday afternoon — the last day Republicans will control both chambers. The House has yet to flesh out any plans before Thursday, but outgoing GOP leadership is giving members 24 hours notice before any vote.

But with no signs of movement toward an agreement to fully reopen the government since Congress missed the Dec. 21 deadline, any progress is likely to wait until at least Thursday. Lawmakers and administration say they are not close to a deal that would fund roughly 25 percent of the federal government, including the Department of Homeland Security.

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Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyWorking together to effectively address patient identification during COVID-19 Finger-pointing picks up in COVID-19 relief fight On The Money: GOP cool to White House's .6T coronavirus price tag | Company layoffs mount as pandemic heads into fall | Initial jobless claims drop to 837,000 MORE (R-Ala.), the chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, warned on Sunday that the partial shutdown “could last a long, long time” and that the negotiations are “at an impasse at the moment.”

“At the end of the day, all of this will end. We don't know when, in negotiations. It's not a question of who wins or loses. Nobody's going to win this kind of game. Nobody wins in a shutdown. We all lose and we kind of look silly,” Shelby told CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

The administration has tried to shift the blame to Democrats, including playing up the idea of a split between members of Democratic leadership. Trump, in a tweet over the weekend, said that he was in “White House waiting for the Democrats to come on over and make a deal on Border Security.”

But Trump — who said earlier this month that he would accept the “mantle” of a shutdown — also indicated late last week and over the weekend that Republicans were using the “hard way,” a shutdown, to try to get the wall funding, and that he believed the fight will benefit him in his 2020 campaign.

“For those that naively ask why didn’t the Republicans get approval to build the Wall over the last year, it is because IN THE SENATE WE NEED 10 DEMOCRAT VOTES, and they will gives us ‘NONE’ for Border Security! Now we have to do it the hard way, with a Shutdown. Too bad,” Trump said in a tweet on Saturday.

Trump separately said in a tweet late last week that Democrats “may have the 10 Senate votes, but we have the issue, Border Security. 2020!”

The crux of the entrenched stalemate on funding part of the government is money for Trump’s U.S.-Mexico border wall. Trump has demanded $5 billion for the wall, an amount approved by House Republicans earlier this month.

But that amount is dead on arrival in the Senate. Trump and Republicans will lose control a key source of leverage on Thursday when Democrats take back control of the House.

House Democrats will likely quickly take up a clean continuing resolution (CR) to reopen the government, as House Democratic Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 | Lawmakers see better prospects for COVID deal after election Overnight Health Care: House Dem report blasts Trump coronavirus response | Regeneron halts trial of antibody drug in sickest hospitalized patients | McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 MORE (Calif.) is expected to take back the Speaker's gavel.

Incoming Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) is reportedly telling members that they are “expected to be present and voting” on Jan. 3 on government funding legislation. A spokesman for Pelosi pledged in a recent tweet that Democrats would “act swiftly to end the Trump Shutdown” and advocate for a policy that includes “strong and smart border security.”

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The floor drama will be the first chance for the new House majority to flex their political muscles after attempts by Democratic lawmakers to force votes on funding legislation that did not include funding for Trump’s border wall were blocked by GOP leadership over the holidays.

House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerDemocrats seek wave to bolster House majority Hoyer lays out ambitious Democratic agenda for 2021, with health care at top Top Democrats introduce resolution calling for mask mandate, testing program in Senate MORE (D-Md.) noted that they tried to offer a Senate-passed stopgap bill to fund part of the government through Feb. 8 but were blocked, adding that Democrats had “already compromised” on the border.

“These are the Republican — they're in the majority — their bills and we're willing to vote to fund them at the Senate-passed bill levels … [Speaker] Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMcCarthy faces pushback from anxious Republicans over interview comments Pelosi and Trump go a full year without speaking Jordan vows to back McCarthy as leader even if House loses more GOP seats MORE [R-Wis.] refused to put it on the floor... [Republicans] have got a history of using the shutdown of government as a strategy to get what they want. We are fully prepared to support the bill that came over from the Senate," Hoyer said.

Passing either a short-term continuing resolution or a larger bill to fund the remaining 25 percent of the federal government through Sept. 30, the end of the 2019 fiscal year, would kick the fight back to the Senate.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTop Senate GOP super PAC makes final .6M investment in Michigan Senate race On The Money: McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 | Lawmakers see better prospects for COVID deal after election Overnight Health Care: House Dem report blasts Trump coronavirus response | Regeneron halts trial of antibody drug in sickest hospitalized patients | McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 MORE (R-Ky.) has publicly taken a back seat in the shutdown fight, arguing in the wake of the partial closure that working out an agreement was between Trump, whose signature they need, and Democrats, whose votes are needed.

But if the House was able to pass a bill it would add new political pressure on McConnell, who has warned repeatedly against shutting down the government. But moving a bill that didn’t have Trump’s support would open up himself and other Republican senators to attacks from the mercurial president.

McConnell has hinted Trump’s support is needed for a vote in the Republican-controlled Senate. And GOP senators say they think it’s unlikely the chamber would move forward on a bill without the president, after Trump caught them flat-footed earlier this month when he rejected the Senate-passed CR.

“I think Sen. McConnell our leader has already addressed that. That said that he would not even take up the bill until he found some compromise that the president would agree to sign. So we're going to be at an impasse. That would be probably an empty gesture, but that goes on in Washington every day,” Shelby said, asked what would happen if the House passed the bill early next month.

Democrats have warned that $1.3 billion is their cap on negotiations and that it would go toward fencing, not a concrete wall. Outgoing White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE told the Los Angeles Times that the administration had moved away from the concept of a literal wall early in the Trump administration.

Speaker vote

Pelosi is expected to be voted in as the next Speaker on Thursday.

The California Democrat secured the 218 votes needed on the floor after striking a deal with a group of rebel Democrats — led by Reps. Seth MoultonSeth MoultonTrump slight against Gold Star families adds to military woes Overnight Defense: Congress recommends nuclear arms treaty be extended | Dems warn Turkey | Military's eighth COVID death identified Bipartisan congressional task force recommends extending nuclear treaty with Russia MORE (Mass.), Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanHouse Democrats introduce bill to invest 0 billion in STEM research and education Now's the time to make 'Social Emotional Learning' a national priority Mourners gather outside Supreme Court after passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg MORE (Ohio) and Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceHillicon Valley: Simulated cyberattack success | New bill for election security funding | Amazon could be liable for defective products Lawmakers introduce bill to help election officials address cyber vulnerabilities House lawmakers to launch probe into DHS excluding NY from Trusted Traveler Program MORE (N.Y.), Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterGreen neighborhoods for better jobs, a cleaner environment, and a sustainable future Congress needs to finalize space weather bill as solar storms pose heightened threat OVERNIGHT ENERGY: 20 states sue over Trump rule limiting states from blocking pipeline projects | House Democrats add 'forever chemicals' provisions to defense bill after spiking big amendment | Lawmakers seek extension for tribes to spend stimulus money MORE (Colo.), Bill FosterGeorge (Bill) William FosterWorking together to effectively address patient identification during COVID-19 Britain to infect healthy individuals with coronavirus for vaccine trials Pelosi, Mnuchin continue COVID-19 talks amid dwindling odds for deal MORE (Ill.) and Linda Sánchez (Calif.) — ensuring she would term-limit herself out of her leadership role. Under the deal Pelosi would step aside as Speaker by 2022.

Pelosi won the nomination for Speaker in caucus in late November in a 203-32 secret-ballot vote. The margin would have been enough to block her from becoming Speaker, but the House Democratic leader has worked furiously to lock down support, cut deals and pick off floated opponents.

Upwards of a dozen Democrats have vowed not to support Pelosi on the floor, including incoming freshman Reps. Max RoseMax RoseDemocrats seek wave to bolster House majority Centrist Democrats got their COVID bill, now they want a vote Lawmakers fear voter backlash over failure to reach COVID-19 relief deal MORE (N.Y.), Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerDemocrats seek wave to bolster House majority During pandemic, 'telehealth' emerging as important lifeline to connect patients with caregivers Chamber-backed Democrats embrace endorsements in final stretch MORE (Va.), Joe CunninghamJoseph CunninghamGeorgia Republican Drew Ferguson tests positive for COVID-19 Democrats see Green New Deal yielding gains despite GOP attacks Michigan Republican isolating after positive coronavirus test MORE (S.C.) and Ben McAdams (Utah). Pelosi can afford to lose 17 votes on the floor.

New members sworn in

New members in both the House and Senate are slated to be sworn in on Jan. 3, eight in the Senate and 100 non-incumbent winners in the lower chamber. Sixty-three of the new House members are Democrats.

Senate Republicans, who are expanding their majority from 51 to 53 seats, will swear in six new members including former GOP presidential nominee Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe looming battle over Latino voters Arizona: On the fast track to swing state status Why Biden could actually win Texas MORE and Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyMark Kelly on Trump hurrying McSally rally speech: Have 'respect' Arizona: On the fast track to swing state status Trump fights for battleground Arizona MORE (R-Ariz.), who lost her Senate bid in November but was appointed to the seat formerly held by Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainThe looming battle over Latino voters Who is 'Anonymous' author Miles Taylor? Why Biden could actually win Texas MORE (R-Ariz.). Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) is delaying his swearing in until Friday.

Sens.-elect Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHouse Democrats introduce bill to invest 0 billion in STEM research and education Hillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Lawmakers introduce legislation to boost cybersecurity of local governments, small businesses MORE (D-Nev.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), who flipped seats previously held by Republicans, will also be sworn in.

Pelosi canceled her planned new member reception scheduled at the National Building Museum in the wake of the shutdown, Politico first reported.