This week: Trump set for Senate setback on emergency declaration
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The Senate is set to reject President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE’s emergency declaration to construct the U.S.-Mexico border wall, paving the way for a veto showdown with the White House.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellAre Democrats turning Trump-like? House Democrat calls for gun control: Cities can ban plastic straws but 'we can't ban assault weapons?' Churches are arming and training congregants in response to mass shootings: report MORE (R-Ky.) hasn’t officially scheduled a vote, but the chamber is expected to take up the measure before Congress leaves town for a weeklong recess.

A House-passed resolution of disapproval has enough support to pass the Senate, with at least four Republicans expected to join with all 47 members of the Democratic caucus to vote for it, and roughly a dozen more undecided.

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Some senators have predicted the number of GOP supporters backing the resolution could hit double digits, which would mark an embarrassing political setback for Trump after he urged Republicans to remain “united” in opposition to a resolution of disapproval.

Trump has pledged to use the first veto of his presidency to block the resolution terminating his emergency declaration. The wall was a key campaign promise for Trump and is still a potent issue for the party’s base.

“He’s going to veto this and then his veto will be sustained. They will not be able to override the veto,” Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoIf Democrats want gun control, they must first concede defeat Conway: Republican concerns about gun reform 'all reconcilable' Five proposals Congress is eyeing after mass shootings MORE (R-Wyo.), the No. 3 Republican senator, said during an interview with Fox News’s "Sunday Morning Futures."

Democratic leadership has urged Republicans to override Trump’s veto, but neither chamber appears to have the two-thirds support necessary to do so successfully, with the emergency declaration instead expected to play out in a lengthy court battle.

Republicans are still trying to craft alternative language as they hunt for a more palatable option than the House resolution, which passed that chamber with the support of 13 Republicans. Senators left town on Thursday without resolving their floor strategy, with anything from amending the House resolution to offering a separate proposal still on the table.

“Republican senators continue to look for a way that encourages the president to look for alternatives,” Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), a member of GOP leadership, said late last week after a closed-door caucus lunch.

Republicans are exploring ways Trump could get $5.7 billion for the wall without declaring a national emergency, a controversial step that has rankled traditional GOP allies on Capitol Hill.

One idea being explored by Republicans is trying to expand the amount of money Trump is reshuffling from the Pentagon’s counter-drug fund, a move that does not require a national emergency. Republicans are also mulling legislation that would make it easier for Congress to end a national emergency, including requiring that Congress vote to continue it after a certain period of time.

"I'm working with my colleagues to fashion legislation next week that will address that, that will make sure we get the funding we need to build the wall we need but not in a way that violates constitutional responsibility," Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyNSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show Overnight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns MORE (R-Pa.) told a Pennsylvania radio station last week.

Though Republicans have been wary of breaking with Trump on border security, they are also concerned that he’s setting a legal precedent that could be used by a future Democratic president to force through policies on issues like climate change or gun control.

Trump’s budget

Trump will start rolling out his budget for the 2020 fiscal year on Monday, setting up another clash with Congress over the wall.

Trump is expected to request $8.6 billion for the U.S.-Mexico border wall, which will be used to build or replace roughly 700 miles of barriers.

Democrats immediately rejected the amount, warning that Trump would force another government shutdown if he demanded the border wall funding.

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"President Trump hurt millions of Americans and caused widespread chaos when he recklessly shut down the government to try to get his expensive and ineffective wall, which he promised would be paid for by Mexico," Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerLewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' Appropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid Colorado candidates vying to take on Gardner warn Hickenlooper they won't back down MORE (D-N.Y.) and House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiObjections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated Latest pro-democracy rally draws tens of thousands in Hong Kong Lewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' MORE (D-Calif.) said in a joint statement.

"Congress refused to fund his wall and he was forced to admit defeat and reopen the government. The same thing will repeat itself if he tries this again," they added. "We hope he learned his lesson."

In addition to a battle over the border wall, Trump is expected to fight with lawmakers over his plans to dramatically increase the amount of overseas contingency operation money, a defense fund that is not subjected to budget caps, as well as cuts to nondefense spending.

Trump’s proposal won’t become law, with White House budgets largely viewed as political documents that lay out an administration’s priorities. But he will need to work out a deal on top-line spending levels for defense and nondefense before Oct. 1 or sequestration will go into effect.

Administration officials — including acting Office of Management and Budget Director Russell Vought, acting Defense Secretary Patrick ShanahanPatrick Michael ShanahanWhy Dave Norquist is the perfect choice for DOD's deputy secretary Five questions for Trump's new defense secretary on first major tour Trump says media is part of vetting his nominees: 'We save a lot of money that way' MORE and Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinTrump phoned bank CEOs as stock market plunged Wednesday: report The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy Trump pressured Mnuchin on labeling China a currency manipulator: report MORE — will head to Capitol Hill this week to defend Trump’s budget request.

Mueller

The House is slated to take up a Democratic-backed nonbinding resolution calling on Department of Justice (DOJ) officials to publicly release special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony Kellyanne Conway: 'I'd like to know' if Mueller read his own report MORE’s report into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

The House Rules Committee is expected to meet on the resolution Monday evening. The measure will then head to the floor in subsequent days.

The resolution comes after Attorney General William Barr, who has opted not to recuse himself from the investigation, would not commit to releasing the final report to the public during his confirmation hearing. Though Barr has pledged to let Mueller finish his investigation, he has sparked backlash because of a memo he drafted criticizing the Russia probe. 

The measure’s text calls for the report to be “made available to the public and to Congress,” arguing there is “overwhelming public interest” in its content and that it should be released in full “except to the extent the public disclosure of any portion thereof is expressly prohibited by law.”

House committee chairmen could potentially subpoena the report if the DOJ opts not to release it to the public.  

“As the Department of Justice made clear over the last two years, DOJ policy permits disclosure of investigative materials when it serves the public interest, even as they pertain to ‘uncharged third parties,’ ”  House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerGOP memo deflects some gun questions to 'violence from the left' House Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death French officials call for investigation of Epstein 'links with France' MORE (D-N.Y.), Committee on Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsCan the Democrats unseat Trump? Democrats slam alleged politicization of Trump State Department after IG report Senior Trump officials accused of harassing, retaliating against career State Dept. employees MORE (D-Md.), House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffAre Democrats turning Trump-like? Schiff offers bill to make domestic terrorism a federal crime New intel chief inherits host of challenges MORE (D-Calif.), Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersBanks give Congress, New York AG documents related to Russians who may have dealt with Trump: report Maxine Waters: Force us to ban assault weapons 'or kick our a--- out of Congress!' Maxine Waters: Escalating killings in US motivated by Trump's 'race baiting' MORE (D-Calif.), Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard NealRichard Edmund NealNY files motion to keep Trump tax returns lawsuit out of DC court Democrats give cold shoulder to Warren wealth tax Senate Dems urge Mnuchin not to cut capital gains taxes MORE (D-Mass.) and Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelDemocrats slam alleged politicization of Trump State Department after IG report Trump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China Liberal Democrat eyes aid cuts to Israel after Omar, Tlaib denied entry MORE (D-N.Y.)  said in a statement.

“The public is clearly served by transparency with respect to any investigation that could implicate or exonerate the President and his campaign. We urge our colleagues on both sides of the aisle to join us in supporting this common sense resolution.”

DREAM Act

Rep. Lucille Roybal-AllardLucille Roybal-AllardDHS wants to shift money to immigration enforcement: report Latina leaders: 'It's a women's world more than anything' Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (D-Calif.) is expected on Tuesday to reintroduce the DREAM Act, which would provide permanent legal protections and a path to citizenship for immigrants who came to the United States illegally as children.

House Democrats unsuccessfully attempted to force for a vote on the measure, which would provide protections for millions of immigrants residing in the U.S., in 2017 via a discharge petition under the then-Republican-controlled chamber.

Passing the legislation is a top priority for Democrats in the House. The bill will likely face an uphill battle in the GOP-controlled Senate, where it would need 60 votes to pass.

VAWA

The House is expected to act swiftly to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in the coming days. Congress allowed VAWA, which provides funding and grants for a variety of programs that tackle domestic abuse, to lapse in February after a provision in a must-pass spending bill that would have extended it was left on the chopping block.

The bill, co-sponsored by Rep. Karen BassKaren Ruth BassKing incites furor with abortion, rape and incest remarks Reuniting families is a critical step in diplomacy with North Korea Democrats warn of Trump trap MORE (D-Calif.) and Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickHouse Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 Ensuring quality health care for those with intellectual disabilities and autism House Democrats target 2020 GOP incumbents in new ad MORE (R-Pa.), was introduced last Thursday.

“With this bill, we are empowering law enforcement and helping stop abusers and stalkers from obtaining firearms,” Pelosi said at a press conference following its introduction.

“We’re supporting survivors with protections against discrimination in the workplace and unjust evictions. And we are strengthening protections, again, for Native American women because every woman everywhere has the right to live free from abuse. We urge all Members to join us in strong, bipartisan support for this bill.”

Nominations

McConnell has teed up another slate of Trump nominees, including a successor for Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughLewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' Cook Political Report moves Susan Collins Senate race to 'toss up' Sen. Susan Collins: Israel should allow Omar, Tlaib to visit MORE’s seat on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

McConnell has filed cloture on Paul Matey’s nomination to be a judge for the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals, Neomi Rao’s nomination to be an appeals judge for the D.C. Circuit and William Beach’s Labor Department nomination.

Rao, who serves as Trump's regulatory czar, was grilled by Democrats and Republicans during her hearing about controversial college writings including a 1994 opinion piece for The Yale Herald in which she appeared to argue that women are partially to blame for sexual assault.

Rao wrote at the time that if a woman “drinks to the point where she can no longer choose, well, getting to that point was a part of her choice.”