The Senate on Thursday approved legislation to fund the government for three more weeks, sending the measure to the White House. 

The 87-13 vote gives President Obama, and congressional Republicans and Democrats, another short window to reach a deal on a measure to fund the government for the rest of the year.

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The outcome in the Senate was similar to a vote earlier this month that funded the government for two weeks. 

Only four more senators voted against the measure on Thursday compared to the earlier vote on March 1, when nine senators voted no. 

Nine Republicans, three Democrats and Independent Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHickenlooper day-old Senate bid faces pushback from progressives Steyer calls on DNC to expand polling criteria for debates Andrew Yang: News coverage of Trump a 'microcosm' of issues facing country MORE (Vt.) voted against the measure on Thursday.

The GOP "no" votes came from Sens. John Ensign (Nev.), James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeSenate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill Democrats, environmentalists blast Trump rollback of endangered species protections Bottom Line MORE (Okla.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGraham promises ObamaCare repeal if Trump, Republicans win in 2020 Conservatives buck Trump over worries of 'socialist' drug pricing Rand Paul to 'limit' August activities due to health MORE (Ky.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads What the gun safety debate says about Washington Trump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China MORE (Fla.), Jim DeMint (S.C.), Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchTrump to award racing legend Roger Penske with Presidential Medal of Freedom Trump awards Presidential Medal of Freedom to economist, former Reagan adviser Arthur Laffer Second ex-Senate staffer charged in aiding doxxing of GOP senators MORE (Utah), Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischTrump moves forward with billion F-16 sale to Taiwan Trump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China Overnight Defense: US exits landmark arms control treaty with Russia | Pentagon vows to 'fully pursue' once-banned missiles | Ratcliffe out as intel pick | Trump signs budget deal that boosts defense | Trump defends North Korea's Kim as 'friend' MORE (Idaho), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoA US-UK free trade agreement can hold the Kremlin to account Oversight Republicans demand answers on Capital One data breach On The Money: Fed cuts rates for first time since financial crisis | Trump rips Fed after chief casts doubt on future cuts | Stocks slide | Senate kicks budget vote amid scramble for GOP support MORE (Idaho) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeA cash advance to consider McConnell, allies lean into Twitter, media 'war' Conservatives buck Trump over worries of 'socialist' drug pricing MORE (Utah). Ensign, Inhofe, Rubio and DeMint voted in favor of the earlier bill.

Sens. Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerBottom Line World Health Day: It's time to fight preventable disease Lobbying World MORE (W.Va.), Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinListen, learn and lead: Congressional newcomers should leave the extremist tactics at home House Democrats poised to set a dangerous precedent with president’s tax returns The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — White House to 'temporarily reinstate' Acosta's press pass after judge issues order | Graham to take over Judiciary panel | Hand recount for Florida Senate race MORE (Mich.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care: Planned Parenthood to leave federal family planning program absent court action | Democrats demand Trump withdraw rule on transgender health | Cummings, Sanders investigate three drug companies for 'obstructing' probe Democrats demand Trump officials withdraw rule on transgender health The Hill's Morning Report - Progressives, centrists clash in lively Democratic debate MORE (Wash.) were the Democratic "no" votes. 

While more senators voted against the short-term measure, the swing against the bill was not as dramatic as in the House, where 54 Republicans voted against their leaders on Tuesday despite a whipping effort. Only six House Republicans had voted against an earlier short-term measure. More Democrats in the House also voted no this week.

Republicans opposing the short-term measure have complained it does not include language blocking funding for the new healthcare law and Planned Parenthood. That language was included in a measure funding the government for the rest of the year that was approved by the House.

Republicans have also argued that it is time to move a bill funding the government for the full year.

The new measure will keep the government funded through April 8. If the two sides do not reach a deal by then, the government would shut down.

Republican senators supporting the resolution on Thursday said it would keep the GOP on a path to meet its target for reducing spending this year.

“I think it [the stopgap] keeps us on track to achieve $61 billion in cuts to federal spending for the remainder for this year,” Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) said in floor comments.

Some Democrats, however, voted against the measure and said it went too far in cutting needed programs. Rockefeller, for example, said the cuts simply went too far in reducing healthcare and other programs. 

The bill would reduce spending this year by $6 billion. Both the Obama administration and Senate Democrats supported many of the cuts.

The measure approved Thursday includes $2.1 billion in rescissions of funds that have not been used; $2.5 billion in earmark terminations and  $1.1 billion to financial services/general government programs.

This includes $276 million for a fund to fight flu pandemics; $225 million in funding for community service employment for older Americans; and $200 million in funding for Internet and technology projects.

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said the three-week stopgap gives Congress “time to find common ground” on a deal to fund government for the remainder of the fiscal year.

“We all agree we want to cut spending, which is why we have already met Republicans halfway,” he said in a statement. But he said the president would continue to oppose "harmful cuts," including in the areas of education and research and development, as well as "additions to the bill that have nothing to do with fiscal policy."

The House and Senate are set to adjourn on Thursday or Friday for a weeklong recess.

This post was updated at 4:05 p.m.