The Senate on Thursday approved legislation to fund the government for three more weeks, sending the measure to the White House. 

The 87-13 vote gives President Obama, and congressional Republicans and Democrats, another short window to reach a deal on a measure to fund the government for the rest of the year.

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The outcome in the Senate was similar to a vote earlier this month that funded the government for two weeks. 

Only four more senators voted against the measure on Thursday compared to the earlier vote on March 1, when nine senators voted no. 

Nine Republicans, three Democrats and Independent Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersWarren, Klobuchar call on FTC to curtail use of non-compete clauses RNC says it raised .6 million in February Pollster says 'it's certainly not looking good' for Trump ahead of 2020 MORE (Vt.) voted against the measure on Thursday.

The GOP "no" votes came from Sens. John Ensign (Nev.), James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeThe Hill's Morning Report - Dems look to rebuild 'blue wall' Funding caps, border wall set stage for defense budget battle Trump's claims of defeating ISIS roil Congress MORE (Okla.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRepublicans need solutions on environment too Trio of NFL players intern on Capitol Hill as part of league program Trump keeps tight grip on GOP MORE (Ky.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump feuds heat up Rubio to introduce legislation to keep Supreme Court at 9 seats Stop asking parents to sacrifice Social Security benefits for paid family leave MORE (Fla.), Jim DeMint (S.C.), Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchNY's political prosecution of Manafort should scare us all Congress must break its addiction to unjust tax extenders The FDA crackdown on dietary supplements is inadequate MORE (Utah), Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischTrump pick for Saudi ambassador defends US relationship with Riyadh Briefing calms senators' nerves after Trump-Kim summit Chris Evans talks NATO, Marvel secrets on Capitol Hill MORE (Idaho), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoSenate confirms Trump court pick despite missing two 'blue slips' Senate reignites blue slip war over Trump court picks New push to open banks to marijuana industry MORE (Idaho) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeStop asking parents to sacrifice Social Security benefits for paid family leave The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump hits media over New Zealand coverage GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers MORE (Utah). Ensign, Inhofe, Rubio and DeMint voted in favor of the earlier bill.

Sens. Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Overnight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term MORE (W.Va.), Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinListen, learn and lead: Congressional newcomers should leave the extremist tactics at home House Democrats poised to set a dangerous precedent with president’s tax returns The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — White House to 'temporarily reinstate' Acosta's press pass after judge issues order | Graham to take over Judiciary panel | Hand recount for Florida Senate race MORE (Mich.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayWhite House proposes limits on student loan borrowing as part of higher education reforms Jury orders Johnson & Johnson to pay M to woman who claimed baby powder gave her cancer Overnight Health Care - Presented by Kidney Care Partners - FDA chief Scott Gottlieb resigns | House Dems to take up drug pricing bills next week | Planned Parenthood, doctors group sue over Trump abortion rule MORE (Wash.) were the Democratic "no" votes. 

While more senators voted against the short-term measure, the swing against the bill was not as dramatic as in the House, where 54 Republicans voted against their leaders on Tuesday despite a whipping effort. Only six House Republicans had voted against an earlier short-term measure. More Democrats in the House also voted no this week.

Republicans opposing the short-term measure have complained it does not include language blocking funding for the new healthcare law and Planned Parenthood. That language was included in a measure funding the government for the rest of the year that was approved by the House.

Republicans have also argued that it is time to move a bill funding the government for the full year.

The new measure will keep the government funded through April 8. If the two sides do not reach a deal by then, the government would shut down.

Republican senators supporting the resolution on Thursday said it would keep the GOP on a path to meet its target for reducing spending this year.

“I think it [the stopgap] keeps us on track to achieve $61 billion in cuts to federal spending for the remainder for this year,” Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) said in floor comments.

Some Democrats, however, voted against the measure and said it went too far in cutting needed programs. Rockefeller, for example, said the cuts simply went too far in reducing healthcare and other programs. 

The bill would reduce spending this year by $6 billion. Both the Obama administration and Senate Democrats supported many of the cuts.

The measure approved Thursday includes $2.1 billion in rescissions of funds that have not been used; $2.5 billion in earmark terminations and  $1.1 billion to financial services/general government programs.

This includes $276 million for a fund to fight flu pandemics; $225 million in funding for community service employment for older Americans; and $200 million in funding for Internet and technology projects.

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said the three-week stopgap gives Congress “time to find common ground” on a deal to fund government for the remainder of the fiscal year.

“We all agree we want to cut spending, which is why we have already met Republicans halfway,” he said in a statement. But he said the president would continue to oppose "harmful cuts," including in the areas of education and research and development, as well as "additions to the bill that have nothing to do with fiscal policy."

The House and Senate are set to adjourn on Thursday or Friday for a weeklong recess.

This post was updated at 4:05 p.m.