In winning a procedural motion, the Senate overcame opposition led by Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHouse gears up for Mueller testimony Trump's no racist — he's an equal opportunity offender Press: Acosta, latest to walk the plank MORE (R-Ala.), the ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee. He argued that it was improper for the Senate to take up appropriations work without first passing a budget. 

Republican Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump announces, endorses ambassador to Japan's Tennessee Senate bid Meet the key Senate player in GOP fight over Saudi Arabia Trump says he's 'very happy' some GOP senators have 'gone on to greener pastures' MORE (Tenn.), Jim DeMint (S.C.), John CornynJohn CornynGOP wants commitment that Trump will sign budget deal Hillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Senators introduce legislation to boost cyber defense training in high school MORE (Texas), Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyScandal in Puerto Rico threatens chance at statehood Poll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Democrat: Treasury 'acknowledged the unprecedented process' in Trump tax return rejection MORE (Iowa), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonMystery surrounds elusive sanctions on Russia Trump may intervene in Pentagon cloud-computing contract: report Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp MORE (Wis.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Health care moves to center stage of Democratic primary fight | Sanders, Biden trade sharps jabs on Medicare for All | Senate to vote on 9/11 bill next week | Buttigieg pushes for cheaper insulin Senate to vote on 9/11 victims bill on Tuesday Meghan McCain slams Rand Paul over blocking 9/11 compensation funding: 'This is a disgrace' MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrump faces new hit on deficit Overnight Defense: US shoots down Iranian drone | Pentagon sending 500 more troops to Saudi Arabia | Trump mulls Turkey sanctions | Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Health care moves to center stage of Democratic primary fight | Sanders, Biden trade sharps jabs on Medicare for All | Senate to vote on 9/11 bill next week | Buttigieg pushes for cheaper insulin MORE (Ky.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRepublican lawmakers ask Trump not to delay Pentagon cloud-computing contract Overnight Defense: US shoots down Iranian drone | Pentagon sending 500 more troops to Saudi Arabia | Trump mulls Turkey sanctions | Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract EU official in Canada says he feels 'at home' there because no one was shouting 'send him back' MORE (Fla.), Pat Toomey (Pa.) and David VitterDavid Bruce VitterLobbying World Senate confirms Trump judge who faced scrutiny over abortion views Collins votes against Trump judicial pick MORE (La.) followed Sessions in trying to derail the measure. 

In June, the House approved the same legislation in a 411-5 vote. 

In filing cloture on the bill last week, Reid cited a "good conversation" he had had with his GOP counterpart, Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants GOP rattled by Trump rally Third Kentucky Democrat announces challenge to McConnell MORE (R-Ky.), and said he enjoyed the support of the leaders of the Senate Appropriations Committee as well.

“Hopefully we can show the country that we can work though an appropriations bill without getting bogged down,” Reid said, referencing the difficulties the Senate has had in moving any legislation this year.

Sessions took to the floor to announce that he would force a symbolic vote to object to the fact that the Senate is proceeding to a 2012 appropriations bill without ever having adopted a budget. 

Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) has developed a budget resolution that can pass his committee but has not tried to move it. It contains $2 trillion in revenue increases that give some Democrats heartburn. The top-line spending number in the end will be decided by White House-led negotiations over the deficit. 

Sessions said he would use a point of order called for in the budget act that would force 50 senators to agree to proceed to an appropriations bill in the absence of an budget.

The Military Construction bill is in itself relatively noncontroversial. The Senate Appropriations and House Appropriations bills differ little in their substance.

The White House on Wednesday outlined some objections to the bill. 

It says that one provision in the bill could be construed to mean the president must notify Congress 30 days in advance of military exercises. The White House says this provision appears to violate the Constitution's granting of commander-in-chief powers to the executive branch.

The White House also said that it is worried about cuts to basing expenses in Bahrain and Guam because it could send a signal to Japan that the U.S. is not going to make good on a commitment to remove U.S. troops from a controversial base at Okinawa. 

The bill spends $72 billion in discretionary funds, a cut of $618 million below current levels and $1.25 billion below President Obama’s budget request.

The Senate bill contains $58.6 billion for VA discretionary funding, an increase of $2.3 billion.