Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerSenators vet Buttigieg to run Transportation Department Wall Street Journal: GOP Electoral College 'stunt' will hurt US, Republican Party Bipartisan group of senators: The election is over MORE (R-Miss.) and eight other Senate Republicans want to give states the right to challenge federal regulations when they believe the rules violate the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution.

Wicker's Restoring the 10th Amendment Act, S. 1632, is an attempt to set up checks on federal rule making authority at the state level. Wicker argues that the federal government has ignored the Tenth Amendment, which holds that powers not delegated to the federal government are "reserved to the States respectively, or to the people."

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"Small businesses, families, and individuals around the country are right to be frustrated with the growing size of their government," Wicker said Thursday. "My bill stresses the need for constitutional checks and balances on executive power and gives states and the American people a tool to challenge federal overreach."

His bill gives state officials "special standing" to challenge proposed regulations during any public comment period. That challenge must be based on arguments that the proposed rule violates the Constitution's Tenth Amendment.

The bill requires the federal agency to post the challenge online, and if the agency decides to continue with the rule, it must certify that the rule does not violate the Tenth Amendment. That certification must include a legal reasoning that supports the agency's position.

Wicker has introduced similar legislation in the past two sessions of Congress. This year's bill is cosponsored by Sens. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future Hyde-Smith fends off challenge from Espy in Mississippi MORE (Miss.), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoGOP digs in on preserving Trump tax cuts OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden's Interior Department temporarily blocks new drilling on public lands | Group of GOP senators seeks to block Biden moves on Paris, Keystone | Judge grants preliminary approval for 0M Flint water crisis settlement Sweeping COVID-19, spending deal hits speed bumps MORE (Idaho), Charles GrassleyChuck GrassleySenate sworn in as jurors for Trump impeachment trial GOP digs in on preserving Trump tax cuts On The Money: Treasury announces efforts to help people get stimulus payments | Senate panel unanimously advances Yellen nomination for Treasury | Judge sets ground rules for release of Trump taxes MORE (Iowa), James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeSenate GOP signals it's likely to acquit Trump for second time Overnight Defense: Austin takes helm at Pentagon | COVID-19 briefing part of Day 1 agenda | Outrage over images of NationalĀ Guard troops in parking garage Senate confirms Austin to lead Pentagon under Biden MORE (Okla.), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonLoeffler concedes to Warnock Hawley to still object to Pennsylvania after Capitol breached Hillary Clinton trolls McConnell: 'Senate Minority Leader' MORE (Ga.), Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSenate swears-in six new lawmakers as 117th Congress convenes Window quickly closing for big coronavirus deal Trump's controversial Fed nominee stalled after Senate setback MORE (Kan.), Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsDOJ rescinds 'zero tolerance' border policy behind family separations With another caravan heading North, a closer look at our asylum law Harris to resign from Senate seat on Monday MORE (Ala.), and John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneDobbs: Republicans lost in 2020 because they 'forgot who was the true leader' Senate GOP signals it's likely to acquit Trump for second time Just five GOP senators vote Trump impeachment trial is constitutional MORE (S.D.).