The Senate followed the lead of the House on Thursday, easily passing a 2012 "minibus" spending bill that also contains a continuing spending resolution keeping the government running through December 16.

The legislation next heads to the president for a signature, likely on Friday.

The bill, H.R. 2112, was approved in a 70-30 vote in which Senate conservatives and some moderate Republican opposed it. All fifty-seven Democrats and the two independents voted in favor of the bill. 

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Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnCongress brings back corrupt, costly, and inequitably earmarks Conservative group escalates earmarks war by infiltrating trainings Democrats step up hardball tactics in Supreme Court fight MORE (R-Okla.) was the only senator to raise his voice against the spending legislation in the two-hours of debate that led up to the vote arguing that once again Congress was abdicating its responsibility to cut spending. 

"I don't think the American people know how badly they have been hoodwinked by the Congress," said Coburn, prior to the vote. "This bill should be defeated...we are running out of money." 

More Democrats and Republicans, however, spoke out in favor of the legislation. Some Republicans, like Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntSenate GOP keeps symbolic earmark ban St. Louis lawyer who pointed gun at Black Lives Matter protesters considering Senate run The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - GOP draws line on taxes; nation braces for Chauvin verdict MORE (Mo.), noted it met the spending caps imposed by the summer's Budget Control Act and came in from the conference at even lower numbers than the original Senate version.

Sen. Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiBottom line How the US can accelerate progress on gender equity Former Md. senator Paul Sarbanes dies at 87 MORE (D-Md.) hailed the bipartisan process that lead to passage as an example of how the Congress ought to work.

The bill was approved earlier in the day in the House by a 298-121 vote in which more Democrats supported it than Republicans. Among Democrats, 165 supported the bill and 20 opposed it, while 133 Republicans supported it and 101 opposed it.