The amendment, penned by Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerRNC says ex-Trump ambassador nominee's efforts 'to link future contributions to an official action' were 'inappropriate' Lindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Nareit — White House cheers Republicans for storming impeachment hearing MORE (R-Tenn.), comes as the near future of the relationship between Pakistan and the U.S. has been put into question as a result of a NATO airstrike on two Pakistani military outposts last week that took the life of 24 Pakistani soldiers.

“This amendment asks for certain reporting to take place from the Pentagon and for them to work at ways of diminishing this reimbursement over time as we wind down our operations in Afghanistan,” said Corker, explaining the amendment from the Senate floor.

Corker, however, said his amendment was designed in such a way as to avoid further provocation against Pakistan.

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“This amendment has been drafted in such a way so as to not further escalate tensions between us and the government of Pakistan,” said Corker, who also described it as a “good government” amendment. 

Floor managers for the underlying bill, Sens. Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinThe Trumpification of the federal courts Global health is the last bastion of bipartisan foreign policy Can the United States Senate rise to the occasion? Probably not MORE (D-Mich.) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMartha McSally fundraises off 'liberal hack' remark to CNN reporter Meghan McCain blasts NY Times: 'Everyone already knows how much you despise' conservative women GOP senator calls CNN reporter a 'liberal hack' when asked about Parnas materials MORE (R-Ariz.), approved of the amendment, as well as expressed suspicion about the allegiance of some factions inside Pakistan’s military. Both senators also conveyed condolences for the soldiers who perished in those NATO airstrikes.