The Senate adopted the motion to proceed Wednesday to a bill that delays flood insurance rate increases.

In addition to an agreement to the motion, the Senate also adopted four amendments to S. 1926, the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act, introduced by Sen. Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezThere is a severe physician shortage and it will only worsen Democrats ask Fed to probe Trump's Deutsche Bank ties Ending the Cyprus arms embargo will increase tensions in the Eastern Mediterranean MORE (D-N.J.).

ADVERTISEMENT

The bill delays a required increase in flood insurance premiums for some homes and would allow homeowners to maintain existing flood insurance subsidies, even after their homes are sold. Supporters of the bill say these changes are needed while the government studies whether homeowners could afford these higher costs.

In 2012, Congress passed flood insurance reforms, called Biggert-Waters, to ensure the bankrupt program regained stability, but some lawmakers have complained that the law was ill conceived because the new rates are too high for some people to stay in their homes.

Menendez and Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonSenate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump GOP senators work to get Trump on board with new disaster aid package Senators say they've reached deal on Puerto Rico aid MORE (R-Ga.) introduced S. 1926, which would delay language that would immediately eliminate flood insurance subsidies for homes built before 1975 upon the sale of those homes. The bill would delay this trigger until the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) does an affordability study. FEMA would also have to certify that its flood maps are accurate — a process that FEMA has said could take three years.

The bill would also grandfather low rates for people who are put into a flood zone for the first time, or are put into a higher-risk flood zone. Biggert-Waters required these people to pay the higher rate, which would be phased in over five years.

With nine Republican co-sponsors, the legislation is expected to pass in the Senate, but it’s unclear if Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerTed Cruz, AOC have it right on banning former members of Congress from becoming lobbyists Ted Cruz, AOC have it right on banning former members of Congress from becoming lobbyists Rep. Amash stokes talk of campaign against Trump MORE (R-Ohio) will allow a vote in the House.

The four amendments agreed to follow:

— Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganTillis trails Democratic challenger by 7 points in North Carolina poll Tillis trails Democratic challenger by 7 points in North Carolina poll North Carolina businessman will challenge Tillis in GOP primary MORE (D-N.C.) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE’s (D-Ark.) amendment to exempt certain loans from the escrow requirement.

— Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioElection security bills face GOP buzzsaw Election security bills face GOP buzzsaw The Hill's Morning Report — Uproar after Trump's defense of foreign dirt on candidates MORE’s (R-Fla.) amendment to require the FEMA to make publicly available data that provide the basis for risk premium rates for flood insurance, to allow monthly installment payments for premiums, and to ensure that mitigation activities completed by an owner or lessee of real property are accounted for when determining risk premium rates for flood insurance.

— Sen. Angus KingAngus Stanley KingOn The Money: Economy adds 75K jobs in May | GOP senator warns tariffs will wipe out tax cuts | Trump says 'good chance' of deal with Mexico On The Money: Economy adds 75K jobs in May | GOP senator warns tariffs will wipe out tax cuts | Trump says 'good chance' of deal with Mexico Trump administration appeals ruling that blocked offshore Arctic drilling MORE’s (I-Maine) amendment to clarify that communities that successfully appeal flood elevation determinations based on errors by FEMA through the Scientific Resolution Panel are eligible for reimbursements for expenses incurred in such appeals. 

— Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntElection security bills face GOP buzzsaw Election security bills face GOP buzzsaw McConnell ups pressure on White House to get a budget deal MORE’s (R-Mo.) amendment to increase the amount of substantial improvements to a property that triggers the loss of flood insurance subsidies.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTrump weighs in on UFOs in Stephanopoulos interview Trump weighs in on UFOs in Stephanopoulos interview Impeachment will reelect Trump MORE (D-Nev.) announced there was an amendment agreement Tuesday night before President Obama’s State of the Union address. Republicans have been critical of Reid for not allowing an open amendment process for most legislation.

Later Wednesday, the Senate is expected to vote on seven other amendments and a budget point of order before proceeding to a final vote on the bill.