The Senate on Monday unanimously approved legislation that boosts protections for victims of military sexual assault.

In a 97-0 vote, the Senate approved S. 1917, the Victims Protection Act. The new bill eliminates the ability to cite a soldier's good record when defending that soldier against assault charges.

It also allows the victims of sexual assault to say whether they'd prefer their cases handled in a military or civilian jurisdiction, and includes sexual assault as part of commanders' performance assessments.

The legislation from Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillGOP congresswoman says she opted out of NRCC run because McCarthy had 'a different plan' Hillicon Valley — Presented by AT&T — Officials warn of threat from Chinese spying | China blamed for Marriott hack | Trump open to intervening in Huawei case | FCC mulls ending merger ban on 'Big Four' networks | California floats tax on texts Bipartisan supply chain bill likely punted to next Congress, McCaskill says MORE (D-Mo.) is a less controversial bill than Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandPavlich: The media gets woke on the Women’s March Warren has contacted 100 people in early 2020 primary states: report O’Rourke is fireball, but not all Dems are sold MORE’s bill, which the Senate rejected last week, although 55 senators voted in support of it.

Gillibrand's bill would have taken the decision to prosecute sexual assault cases outside the military's chain of command. The Pentagon and Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinHouse Democrats poised to set a dangerous precedent with president’s tax returns The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — White House to 'temporarily reinstate' Acosta's press pass after judge issues order | Graham to take over Judiciary panel | Hand recount for Florida Senate race Congress must use bipartisan oversight as the gold standard MORE (D-Mich.) opposed that change.

Gillibrand and her supporters argued that the proposal is necessary because victims aren’t reporting sexual assault crimes for fear of reprisal, while opponents and Pentagon brass said that commanders needed to maintain accountability to curb the problem of sexual assault within the military’s ranks. 

McCaskill’s bill keeps the current military justice system intact.  

Ahead of Monday’s vote, Levin spoke in support of McCaskill’s bill, saying it adds “important new protections” in addition to what was accomplished in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) last year. 

“We can approve legislation that adds important new protections for victims of sexual assault,” Levin said. “They will surely make a major contribution in protecting the troops who protect us.”

McCaskill has said the changes in the NDAA are "historic" and will help the military curb the number of sexual assaults within its ranks. The law stripped commanders' ability to overturn guilty verdicts, required the discharge of those convicted of sexual assault and expanded a special counsel program giving victims legal representation.

It’s unclear if Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) will bring up McCaskill’s bill for a vote on the House floor. The legislation may instead be incorporated into this year's Defense authorization bill, which the House Armed Services Committee expects to take up around May.

A committee aide said the legislation is "worthy of consideration."

Gillibrand and McCaskill have battled for almost a year on the chain of command issue, holding dueling press conferences, releasing fact checks and counter-fact checks and mounting private lobbying campaigns with their colleagues.

Lawmakers have become more outspoken about the issue since the release of a Pentagon report estimating there were 26,000 cases of unwanted sexual contact in 2012, an increase of one-third.