The Senate voted 100-0 Thursday for an amendment that would prohibit parents with more than $1 million in assets from qualifying for child care grants.

The Senate is considering S. 1086, the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) reauthorization bill, and final passage is expected later in the day.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnAmerican patients face too many hurdles in regard to health-care access Live coverage: Donnelly, Braun clash in Indiana debate The Hill's Morning Report — How will the Kavanaugh saga impact the midterms? MORE (R-Okla.) introduced the amendment to the bipartisan bill, which provides block grants to states to help low-income working parents obtain child care for more than 1.5 million children under age 13.

Sens. Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiAthletic directors honor best former student-athletes on Capitol Hill Dems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee Robert Mueller's forgotten surveillance crime spree MORE (D-Md.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrDems can use subpoena power to reclaim the mantle of populism Collusion judgment looms for key Senate panel The National Trails System is celebrating 50 years today — but what about the next 50 years? MORE (R-N.C.), Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinOn Nicaragua, the silence of the left is deafening Dem Senator open to bid from the left in 2020 Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation MORE (D-Iowa) and Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOvernight Health Care — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Senate blocks Dem measure on short-term health plans | Trump signs bill banning drug price 'gag clauses' | DOJ approves Aetna-CVS merger | Juul ramps up lobbying Trump signs bills banning drug pricing 'gag clauses' Senate defeats measure to overturn Trump expansion of non-ObamaCare plans MORE (R-Tenn.) wrote the legislation.

The bill also aims to improve the quality of the CCDBG program, which hasn’t been reauthorized since 1996. If passed into law, a state would now have to conduct background checks on all child care providers receiving the grants and perform at least one annual inspection of licensed CCDBG providers. It also allows states to use some of the federal funds to promote nutritional and physical education for children in the program.

The Senate also passed amendments from Sens. Rob Portman (R-Ohio), Jon Tester (D-Mont.), John Thune (R-S.D.), Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) through voice votes.

Tester’s amendment provides more flexibility to allow Native American tribes to use their block grant funds to improve child care facilities.

Thune's amendment specifies that child care certificates may be included in state strategies to increase the supply of child care.

Bennet's amendment expands the requirement that space allotted to child care providers in federal buildings will be used to provide child care services to children of whom at least 50 percent have one parent or guardian employed by the federal government.

Portman's amendment provides for evidence-based training that promotes early language and literacy development. And Warren's amendment would connect child care workers pursuing postsecondary degrees in that field to federal and state student loan programs.

On Wednesday, the Senate adopted nine other amendments.