Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGraham: I hope Dems 'get their ass kicked' for conduct around Kavanaugh Saudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP Overnight Defense: Trump worries Saudi Arabia treated as 'guilty until proven innocent' | McConnell opens door to sanctions | Joint Chiefs chair to meet Saudi counterpart | Mattis says Trump backs him '100 percent' MORE (R-Ky.) responded to President Obama's newly released budget Monday, dubbing it "a charade" and "campaign document" that even lacked support from congressional Democrats.

"Today President Obama released a budget that isn’t really a budget at all," said McConnell. "It’s a campaign document."

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“So this is a charade, this is a charade,” he added later in his floor speech in suggesting his counterpart, Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidMajor overhauls needed to ensure a violent revolution remains fictional Senate heads home to campaign after deal on Trump nominees GOP has always been aggressive in trying to weaponize the system of judicial nominations MORE (D-Nev.), would not call up the plan due to lack of Democratic support. 

President Obama on Monday morning sent Congress a $3.8 trillion budget proposal, which he called a “reflection of shared responsibility.” The plan would lower deficit predictions over the next decade by $3 trillion financed with $1.5 trillion in new taxes and savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and some cuts in mandatory spending. 

In particular McConnell blasted Obama's plan to use savings from the end of the wars for infrastructure spending and stimulus, calling it a "gimmick" and suggesting it was a cheap accounting trick. 

The minority leader also dismissed White House Chief of Staff Jack LewJacob (Jack) Joseph LewOvernight Finance: US reaches deal with ZTE | Lawmakers look to block it | Trump blasts Macron, Trudeau ahead of G-7 | Mexico files WTO complaint Obama-era Treasury secretary: Tax law will make bipartisan deficit-reduction talks harder GOP Senate report says Obama officials gave Iran access to US financial system MORE's claim on Sunday that Democrats' inability to get 60 votes in the Senate would block the plan. McConnell pointed out that under Senate rules a budget needs only 50 votes, but suggested Reid will call not call it up for lack of Democratic support

“The inconvenient truth that President Obama and his own top advisers don’t want to admit is that this budget isn’t going anywhere because the president’s own party doesn’t want to have anything to do with it," said McConnell. "Indeed, the Democratic majority leader here in the Senate has already declared it dead on arrival."

When the Senate voted on Obama's budget for 2012 in May, it failed 97-0.

Reid also took the floor briefly Monday afternoon, but spoke of the pending highway bill and did not mention Obama's budget.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanElection Countdown: O'Rourke brings in massive M haul | Deal on judges lets senators return to the trail | Hurricane puts Florida candidates in the spotlight | Adelson spending big to save GOP in midterms How Kavanaugh got the votes  Collins to support Kavanaugh, securing enough votes for confirmation MORE (R-Ohio), a former Office of Management and Budget director under former President George W. Bush, spoke after McConnell and said Obama's budget was not responsible given the fiscal crisis.

"In an era of trillion-dollar deficits and an historic debt, and the greatest level of government spending since World War II, I believe the President's submission today was not a responsible budget," Portman said. "Instead of keeping his campaign promise to cut the deficit in half in his first term, this budget assumes continued deficits this year and next in the trillion dollar range."

Portman said Obama has proposed $350 billion in new stimulus spending that is not paid for, and that of the $5.3 trillion in claimed deficit reduction, only a few billion comes from actual spending cuts.

Portman further argued that the budget inflates the baseline, which allows the administration to hide another nearly $500 billion in new spending that completely eliminates the actual small amount of cuts in the budget.