Vulnerable senators back Obama on arming Syrian rebels
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Most Democrats facing tough reelection challenges this fall voted to approve a $1 trillion government funding bill to give President Obama new authorization to combat a growing threat from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). 

The stopgap spending bill, which the Senate voted 78-22 to approve, will keep the government funded through Dec. 11, and included authorization to arm and train moderate Syrian rebel groups to fight ISIS and funding for Ebola research.

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But Sen. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska political mess has legislators divided over meeting place Former GOP chairman Royce joins lobbying shop Lobbying world MORE (D-Alaska), one of the most vulnerable incumbents, opposed the measure because of the ISIS provision.

“I do not support the arming of rebels in Syria,” Begich said.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch Funding a strong defense of our nation's democratic process can't wait The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants MORE (R-Ky.), in a tough reelection fight himself this fall, said the measure was “worth supporting.” 

“This isn’t perfect legislation, but it begins to address many of our constituents’ top concerns without raising discretionary spending,” McConnell said ahead of the vote. “And it positions us for better solutions in the months to come.”

Some senators complained that the issue regarding ISIS and the funding provisions were lumped together, but most seeking reelection wanted to avoid the threat of another government shutdown on Oct. 1. Many also wanted to leave Washington by Friday so they could resume campaigning.

Last October’s government shutdown lasted more than two weeks and was politically unpopular with the public.