The Senate passed the Violence Against Women Act on Thursday in a 68-31 vote, with all of the no votes coming from Republican men.

Ten Republican men and all of the female Republican senators voted in favor of the bill, which would increase penalties on criminals convicted of domestic violence and provides additional funding to programs to reduce sexual assaults and domestic violence.

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The legislation had been caught up in the battle for female votes in the presidential election, and GOP leaders decided to allow the bill to proceed to limit any political damage from it.

The legislation faces a rockier road in the House, however, where rival legislation has been offered by Republican lawmakers.

Sen. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganNC state senator meets with DSCC as Dems eye challenge to Tillis GOP, Dems locked in fight over North Carolina fraud probe 2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives MORE (D-N.C.) praised the chamber's passage of the vote. 

“I am thrilled that the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act passed the Senate today,” said Hagan. “I'm relieved that my Senate colleagues have put partisanship aside to move this important legislation forward. VAWA is essential to the protection and safety of women, and I urge the House to act swiftly to provide continued protection to victims of violent crimes."

Republicans in the Senate had objected to several other provisions in the bill.

They opposed an increase in visas for victims of domestic violence seeking protection who are illegal immigrants, as well as broadened authority for Native American communities to fight domestic violence and sexual assaults. Republican senators also disagreed with language in the bill that prohibited discrimination of domestic violence victims because of their sexual orientation.

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate GOP proposes constitutional amendment to keep Supreme Court at 9 seats Stop asking parents to sacrifice Social Security benefits for paid family leave The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump hits media over New Zealand coverage MORE (R-Utah), an opponent of the bill, said it was an overreach of federal authority.

“Everyone agrees that against women is reprehensible,” Lee said. “The Violence Against Women Act reauthorization has the honorable goal of assisting victims of domestic violence but it oversteps the Constitution's rightful limits on federal power.

“It interferes with the flexibility of states and localities that they should have in tailoring programs to meet particular needs of individual communities,” he said. “And it fails to address problems of duplication and inefficiency.”

Republicans tried to push an alternate version of that bill that did not include the contentious provisions but that legislation failed.

Senate Republicans were a bit split on the measure, however, as eight members of their caucus were co-sponsors of the legislation.

A day earlier Senate Republicans agreed to let the Democratic-backed bill move forward to a final vote. Republicans in the chamber said they did not want to take the bait and oppose the bill allowing Democrats to label them against women's rights and continue to accuse them of waging a “war on women.”

Democrats pushed back hard on critics of the legislation.

“I believe that opposing the bill before us would defy every ounce of commonsense that I have in my body,” said Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinFCC claims on broadband access under scrutiny Senate gears up for Green New Deal vote Overnight Energy: Green New Deal vote set to test Dem unity | Renewables on track to phase out coal, study finds | EPA chief reportedly recuses himself from mine review MORE (D-W.Va.).  “I am proud sponsor of the Violence Against Women Act as are most of my colleagues here in this body because it is unfathomable that any individual could oppose efforts to ensure women and children are free from violence.”

Just before the vote, the chamber voted on three amendments to the bill, all of which failed in votes that required a majority of 60 senators.

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharFCC claims on broadband access under scrutiny Senate gears up for Green New Deal vote Overnight Energy: Green New Deal vote set to test Dem unity | Renewables on track to phase out coal, study finds | EPA chief reportedly recuses himself from mine review MORE's (D-Minn.) amendment to set a minimum amount for rape kit testing funds failed in a 57 -41 vote, while a similar measure from Sen. John CornynJohn CornynConservatives wage assault on Mueller report Senate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks GOP rep to introduce constitutional amendment to limit Supreme Court seats to 9 MORE's (R-Texas) that increased funding but did not set a minimum amount failed 50-48. Cornyn’s bill also would have established a forensic registry for sexual assaults.

A third amendment from Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) failed 36-63. It would have increased the total funding for testing backlogged rape kits and also kept funding for VAWA at the same amount before it was reauthorized in an effort to not increase the country's deficit.

Every Democrat voted for the bill. The Republicans who voted yes were Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderSenate gears up for Green New Deal vote Overnight Health Care — Presented by the American Conservative Union — ObamaCare enrollment dips slightly to 11.4M signups for 2019 | Dem support grows for allowing public funds to pay for abortions | House to hold hearing on surprise medical bills House Dems to hold hearing on preventing surprise medical bills MORE (Tenn.), Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump keeps tight grip on GOP Brexit and exit: A transatlantic comparison Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (Tenn.), Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteSchultz recruiting GOP insiders ahead of possible 2020 bid Bottom Line US, allies must stand in united opposition to Iran’s bad behavior MORE (N.H.), Scott Brown (Mass.), Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Dems look for traction following Barr-Mueller findings Overnight Defense: Pentagon lists construction projects at risk from emergency declaration | Officials deny report on leaving 1,000 troops in Syria | Spy budget request nears B Trump administration requests nearly B for spy budget MORE (Ind.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Dems look for traction following Barr-Mueller findings Senate rejection of Green New Deal won't slow Americans' desire for climate action Senate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks MORE (Maine), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoSenate GOP proposes constitutional amendment to keep Supreme Court at 9 seats On The Money: Taxpayers slow to file as they grapple with tax law | Schiff says Dems to charge ahead with Trump probes | Feds charge Avenatti with trying to extort Nike | Yellen sees no recession in sight This week: Congress set for next stage of Mueller probe fight MORE (Idaho), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds MORE (Nev.), Kay Bailey Hutchison (Texas), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSenate GOP eyes probes into 2016 issues 'swept under the rug' Gallego won't seek Ariz. Senate seat, clearing Dem path for Kelly Khizr Khan blasts Trump's McCain attacks: 'How dare this Russian-tainted president disrespects our hero' MORE (Ariz.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanTrump faces political risks in fight over GM plant GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE (Ohio), Olympia Snowe (Maine), David VitterDavid Bruce VitterBottom Line Bottom Line Top 5 races to watch in 2019 MORE (La.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRed dresses displayed around American Indian museum to memorialize missing, murdered native women Juan Williams: Don't rule out impeaching Trump The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE (Alaska), and John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenFCC claims on broadband access under scrutiny Senate GOP proposes constitutional amendment to keep Supreme Court at 9 seats Dem lawmaker 'confident' bipartisan group will strike deal on border funding MORE (N.D). 

Vice President Biden, who was the original author of VAWA, praised the bill's passage. Biden drafted the legislation in 1994 while he was a senator.

"In 2012, we should be beyond questioning the need for the Violence Against Women Act," Biden said in a statement. "This law has been overwhelmingly successful since it was first enacted 17 years ago to improve the criminal justice response to this violent crime and to assist those who experience this abuse. Since then, the law has twice been reauthorized with the broad support of members of both parties. It should still be bigger than politics today."

Biden urged the House to swiftly pass the legislation.

"Now the House needs to act so the president can sign this vital legislation as soon as possible," Biden said.

This story was updated at 6:52 p.m.