A budget resolution based on President Obama’s 2013 budget failed to get any votes in the Senate on Wednesday.

In a 99-0 vote, all of the senators present rejected the president’s blueprint.

It’s the second year in a row the Senate has voted down Obama’s budget.

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Obama's 2012 budget failed 97 to 0 last May after Obama himself last April said he wanted deeper deficit cuts.

The House earlier this year unanimously rejected Obama's budget.

The White House sought to provide cover for Democrats to vote against the Obama budget resolution before the vote, arguing the resolution offered by Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsConservatives fume over format of upcoming Rosenstein interview Support for legal marijuana hits all-time high: Gallup Beto O'Rourke on impeachment: 'There is enough there to proceed' MORE (R-Ala.) was different from Obama’s budget because it did not include policy report language.

Democrats made the same point on the floor Wednesday in explaining their votes.

The Senate also voted on four GOP budget blueprints, which were all defeated. 


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The GOP forced the votes and believes they showcase the party's ability to produce plans that eventually balance the budget with the lack of a Democratic alternative.

Republicans have hammered Senate Democrats for their inability to produce a budget, which the GOP notes is approaching three years.

“For three years, Senate Democrats have refused to produce a budget, as required by law,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellElection Countdown: Takeaways from heated Florida governor's debate | DNC chief pushes back on 'blue wave' talk | Manchin faces progressive backlash | Trump heads to Houston rally | Obama in Las Vegas | Signs of huge midterm turnout Sanders: Democrats ‘absolutely’ have chance to win back rural America  Trump privately ready to blame Ryan and McConnell if Republicans lose midterms: report MORE (R-Ky.) said in a statement. “And today, they soundly rejected the president’s budget proposal which spends too much, taxes too much and borrows too much."

McConnell said Obama's budget was "bad for jobs because it includes the biggest tax hike in history, it’s bad for seniors because it lets Medicare and Social Security become insolvent and it’s bad for our economy because it fails to address the nation’s $15 trillion debt.”

But the GOP push was blunted a bit when the House Republican budget from Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanElection Countdown: Takeaways from heated Florida governor's debate | DNC chief pushes back on 'blue wave' talk | Manchin faces progressive backlash | Trump heads to Houston rally | Obama in Las Vegas | Signs of huge midterm turnout Will the Federal Reserve make a mistake by shifting to inflation? Sanders: Democrats ‘absolutely’ have chance to win back rural America  MORE (R-Wis.) faced Republican defections in a 41-58 vote. 

The "no" votes included five Republicans: Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsManchin wrestles with progressive backlash in West Virginia Conservatives bankrolled and dominated Kavanaugh confirmation media campaign The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns MORE (Maine), Olympia Snowe (Maine), Scott Brown (Mass.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPaul to Saudi government: 'It takes a lot of damn gall' to lecture US Congress raises pressure on Saudi Arabia The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump says he is cutting foreign aid over caravan | Lawmakers point fingers at Saudi crown prince | DNC chair downplays 'blue wave' talk MORE (Ky.) and Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerGOP-affiliated voters outperforming Democrats in key states’ early voting: report Democrats slide in battle for Senate Biden: American values being 'shredded' under Trump MORE (Nev.). Heller and Brown are both in competitive reelection battles this fall.

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPoll: Palin unpopular in Alaska following jab at Murkowski Conservatives bankrolled and dominated Kavanaugh confirmation media campaign Ex-Florida lawmaker leaves Republican Party MORE (R-Alaska) initially voted against Ryan's budget but then changed her vote to "yes." She had voted against Ryan's budget last year.

In a statement, she said said she voted for Ryan's budget now that he had altered the Medicare proposals to make private insurance only an option.

Heller explained his no vote by saying the votes staged by his own leadership were a sham he would not endorse.

“Today was about political posturing. The American people are tired of it, and so am I,” he said.

Snowe lamented she was not able to offer amendments to the Ryan budget and Brown called for a bipartisan approach.

“We need to end our out-of-control spending, our trillion dollar annual deficits, and the attitude that taxing more and spending more is the answer," Brown said. "To do that, we need to work together, Democrats and Republicans.”

Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney's campaign pounced on the news, noting more than 500 members of Congress had now gone on record opposing Obama's budget. 

"President Obama is clearly in over his head and incapable of leading the country," Lanhee Chen, Romney's policy director, said in a statement. "It is time to turn to Mitt Romney's proven experience and leadership."

The other three budget resolutions sponsored by Sens. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), Paul, and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeCongress raises pressure on Saudi Arabia Senators pledge action on Saudi journalist’s disappearance Bernie Sanders: US should pull out of war in Yemen if Saudis killed journalist MORE (R-Utah) failed in 42-57, 16-83, and 17-82 votes, respectively.

No Democrats voted for any of the budgets and Collins, Brown, Heller and Snowe voted against all the plans.

Toomey sent out a new release gloating that his budget got one more vote than the Ryan plan. While the Ryan plan balances the budget by 2040, Toomey's does so in eight years.

Paul’s budget plan balances the budget in five years, partly by eliminating four government departments.

Lee's budget, which also balanced the budget in five years, is modeled after a proposal from the Heritage Foundation and cuts a steep $7 trillion right away. Democrats said Lee had made serious math errors in his budget, however.

Toomey would also cut all marginal individual income tax rates by 20 percent, and reduce the top corporate rate to 25 percent.

Both Paul (17 percent) and Lee (25 percent) would install a flat tax for businesses and individuals.

—This story was updated at 7:47 p.m.