A frustrated Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidWhitehouse says Democratic caucus will decide future of Judiciary Committee Bottom line Bottom line MORE (D-Nev.) on Thursday said he will likely push for changes to filibuster rules if the Democrats retain control of the upper chamber next year.

“I’ll just bet you … if we maintain a majority, and I feel quite confident that we can do that, and the president is reelected, there is going to be some changes,” Reid said on the Senate floor. “We can no longer go through this, every bill, filibusters [even] on bills that they agree with. It’s just a waste of time to prevent us from getting things done.”

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It remains unclear, however, if Reid would have the votes to change the Senate’s rules, which would require a simple majority vote at the start of the new Congress. Should Democrats retain control of the Senate, they will likely have a razor-thin majority in 2013. Only one or two defections could lead to defeat of the motion, as all Republicans are united against such a change in rules.


A few Democrats, including Sens. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBottom line Bottom line Bottom line MORE (Mont.) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorCotton glides to reelection in Arkansas Live updates: Democrats fight to take control of the Senate Lobbying world MORE (Ark.), have previously defected on measures that would change filibuster rules. Both senators are up for reelection in 2014.

Reid was frustrated over Thursday’s procedural vote on the farm bill — specifically, a vote to end debate on the motion to proceed to that bill. The Nevada Democrat implied that Republicans had not consented to proceeding with the legislation, which forced him to formally end debate through a vote.




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“We’re going to have a cloture vote on the ability for us to proceed to the bill, the ability of us to start legislating,” Reid said. “I don’t need to give a lecture … about how vexatious this is that we have to do this every time.”

Reid’s complaint was borne out as the Senate approved the motion to end debate, 90-8.

The Senate has been plagued with many of these procedural votes in the 112th Congress, which has slowed Senate work on several key measures.

Republicans noted that Reid specified he would press for changes to filibuster rules only if the Democrats hold the Senate, and said that seemed to imply that Democrats would favor current filibuster rules if they were in the minority. A spokesman for Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellImmigration, executive action top Biden preview of first 100 days Spending deal clears obstacle in shutdown fight McConnell pushed Trump to nominate Barrett on the night of Ginsburg's death: report MORE (R-Ky.) added that those who oppose Democratic plans for the economy are grateful for the ability to disrupt these plans. 

“Americans saw what happened when Democrats had a filibuster-proof Senate: ObamaCare, stimulus and massive new job-killing regulations were rushed through Congress,” said McConnell aide Don Stewart.

Stewart on Thursday tweeted prior statements Reid has made about the filibuster, including one in 2006 when he praised it for serving “the long-term interest of the Senate.”

Democrats stress they are not looking to eliminate the filibuster, but instead make senators vote on actual bills than blocking it through procedural motions. 

Reid spoke in a morning session over which Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallFive House Democrats who could join Biden Cabinet Overnight Energy: Biden names John Kerry as 'climate czar' | GM reverses on Trump, exits suit challenging California's tougher emissions standards | United Nations agency says greenhouse gas emissions accumulating despite lockdown decline GSA transition delay 'poses serious risk' to Native Americans, Udall says MORE (D-N.M.) presided, and noted Udall’s proposal last year to amend the filibuster rules. Udall is a leading proponent of reform, and last year proposed that senators should have to remain on the floor in order to maintain a filibuster. He also proposed an end to secret holds on nominations.

The Obama administration has indicated support for altering aspects of the filibuster.

Vice President Biden suggested in 2010 he was in favor of filibuster reform. At the time, he said, “From my perspective, having served here, having been elected seven times, I’ve never seen a time when [the filibuster has] become standard operating procedure.”

— This story was posted at 9:54 a.m. amd updated at 6:53 p.m. 

— This story was updated at 3:05 p.m. to add Republican reaction.