ADVERTISEMENT

The Thursday vote on the bill, sponsored by Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnAmerican patients face too many hurdles in regard to health-care access Live coverage: Donnelly, Braun clash in Indiana debate The Hill's Morning Report — How will the Kavanaugh saga impact the midterms? MORE (R-Okla.), was 95 to 4. Sens. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerFormer Dem aide makes first court appearance on charges of posting GOP senators' info online Ex-House intern charged with 'doxing' GOP senators during Kavanaugh hearing Capitol Police arrest suspect in doxing of GOP senators MORE (D-Calif.), Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuLobbying world Former New Orleans mayor: It's not my 'intention' to run for president Dems grasp for way to stop Trump's Supreme Court pick MORE (D-La.)., Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiAthletic directors honor best former student-athletes on Capitol Hill Dems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee Robert Mueller's forgotten surveillance crime spree MORE (D-Md.) and Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Overnight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term MORE (D-W.Va.) were the only nay votes.

Under the amendment, the federal government is prohibited from using money from the Presidential Election Campaign Fund for political party conventions, effective Dec. 31, 2012, after the next Republican and Democratic presidential conventions in late August and early September. According to Coburn, the amendment saves a total of $36.6 million.

The funds would instead be used toward reducing the deficit.

Coburn and Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery UdallTrump calls Kavanaugh accusations ‘totally political’ Record number of LGBT candidates running for governor Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation MORE (D-Colo.) introduced a similar standalone bill in early June.

Just before the vote on Coburn's amendment, the Senate defeated an amendment, 26 to 73, by Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's debate showdown Live coverage: Cruz faces O'Rourke in Texas debate showdown Saudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP MORE (I-Vt.) allowing states to require a label on food products that include a genetically engineered ingredient.

The Senate also defeated an amendment by Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSaudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP Overnight Defense: Trump worries Saudi Arabia treated as 'guilty until proven innocent' | McConnell opens door to sanctions | Joint Chiefs chair to meet Saudi counterpart | Mattis says Trump backs him '100 percent' Dems can use subpoena power to reclaim the mantle of populism MORE (R-Fla.) that amends the National Labor Relations Board Act to let employers pay higher wages to individual employees. That amendment was defeated 45 to 54.