The Senate passed the Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012 on Thursday.

The vote was 64-35.

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Forty-six Democrats and 16 Republicans voted for the bill. Both Independents who caucus with the Democrats, Sens. Joe Lieberman (Conn.) and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersSanders campaign reports raising M in less than a day The Memo: Bernie Sanders’s WH launch sharpens ‘socialist’ question Gillibrand uses Trump Jr. tweet to fundraise MORE (Vt.), voted for it.

Thirty Republicans voted against the measure. Democratic Sens. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuLobbying world Former New Orleans mayor: It's not my 'intention' to run for president Dems grasp for way to stop Trump's Supreme Court pick MORE (La.), Frank Lautenberg (N.J.), Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.), Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedPapering over climate change impacts is indefensible Why Democrats are pushing for a new nuclear policy GOP chairman: US military may have to intervene in Venezuela if Russia does MORE (R.I.) and Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal GOP Green New Deal stunt is a great deal for Democrats Pence met with silence after mentioning Trump in Munich speech MORE (R.I.) voted against it.

The  bill funds agriculture, farm and nutrition programs over the next five years. It is projected to spend $969 billion over ten years. 

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsGOP senators offer praise for Klobuchar: 'She’s the whole package' The Hill's Morning Report - House Dems prepare to swamp Trump with investigations The Hill's Morning Report — Will Ralph Northam survive? MORE (R-Kan.), one of the co-sponsors of the bill along with Sen. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowLand conservation tax incentives should inspire charitable giving, not loopholes Four names emerge for UN position: report Democrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal MORE (D-Mich.), praised the amended version just ahead of the vote. He also highlighted the legislation's $23 billion in deficit reduction.

"This is a good bill. Is it the best possible bill? No. It is the best bill possible," Roberts said. "And we should move, and we should vote for it, and I urge you to vote for it."

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidSanders hires veteran progressive operative to manage 2020 bid Constitutional conservatives need to oppose the national emergency Klobuchar: 'I don't remember' conversation with Reid over alleged staff mistreatment MORE (D-Nev.) said he hoped the GOP-controlled House would pass the Senate farm bill quickly.

"I've managed quite a few bills in my day — this is a difficult, difficult bill to have in the position we have it in now. I hope that our friends in the House see what we have done. We're working together; I know that they can," Reid said.

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Frank Lucas (R-Okla.) said he hoped members in the House were encouraged by the farm bill's passage.

"Although there will be differences between the Senate approach and our own, I hope my colleagues are encouraged by this success when we meet on the 11th to consider our own legislation," Lucas said in a statement. "The House Agriculture Committee will consider a balanced proposal that saves taxpayers billions of dollars, recognizes the diversity of American agriculture, respects the risks producers face, and preserves the tools necessary for food production."

Reid also praised Roberts's and Stabenow's work on the bill.

"I cannot say enough, although I will try, to applaud and compliment Sen. Stabenow and Sen. Roberts. They're both my friends, but my view of them has risen appreciably in their legislative methods of getting this done," Reid said. "They have done this on their own. [Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDems think they're beating Trump in emergency declaration battle Sanders: 'Not crazy' about nixing the Senate filibuster McCabe: No one in 'Gang of Eight' objected to FBI probe into Trump MORE (R-Ky.)] and I have done what we can, but we've been bystanders to much of what's gone on. It's been the work of these two fine senators and the cooperation of every member."

The vote on the bill (S.3240) came immediately after the chamber finished a two-day marathon on consideration of 73 amendments to it. The farm bill's passage seemed all but certain after party leaders announced a deal on amendments. Recent legislation has made it through the chamber only after an agreement over how many and which amendments to the bill should be considered. On the farm bill, legislators submitted hundreds of amendments, some of them not directly related to food, agriculture or farming.

The Senate now moves on a cloture vote on a national flood insurance bill (S. 1940).