Reid said he hopes he and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump Jr. inches past DeSantis as most popular GOP figure in new poll: Axios House rejects GOP effort to seat McCarthy's picks for Jan. 6 panel Senators scramble to save infrastructure deal MORE (R-Ky.) can agree to proceed to the bill Thursday; if not, a vote to proceed to the bill will take place Friday morning.

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Reid said he has ideas on how to better the bill, too.

“In my view, it’s not strong enough,” Reid said. “But it’s a tremendous move forward.”

Reid said he wants committees to start working on a list of amendments because the issue is critical to national security.

“Unless we do something, it’s not a question of if, it’s a question of when,” Reid said of the chances of a cyberattack.

Republicans have recently criticized Reid for not being more open during the amendment process.

The Cybersecurity Act aims to protect American from cyberattacks against the Web, electrical grid, banking systems, military operations, transportation networks and others.

S. 3414 was introduced by Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and is co-sponsored by Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSchumer urges GOP to ignore Trump: He's 'rooting for failure' Trump pressures McConnell, GOP to ditch bipartisan talks until they have majority Transit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal MORE (R-Maine), Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperFrustration builds as infrastructure talks drag Democrats pushing for changes to bipartisan infrastructure deal Transit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal MORE (D-Del.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinBiden signs bill to bolster crime victims fund Stripping opportunity from DC's children Progressive groups ask for town hall with Feinstein to talk filibuster MORE (D-Calif.), Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerBottom Line World Health Day: It's time to fight preventable disease Lobbying World MORE (D-W.Va.) and Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseKavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law Christine Blasey Ford's lawyers blast FBI's Kavanaugh investigation as 'sham' New York gun rights case before Supreme Court with massive consequences  MORE (D-R.I.).

“We must act and we must act now,” Collins said Wednesday. “We can’t afford to wait for a cyber 9/11 before taking action on this legislation.”

Lawmakers have been meeting this week to find common ground. Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMeghan McCain on Pelosi, McCarthy fight: 'I think they're all bad' Democrats seek to counter GOP attacks on gas prices Biden nominates Jeff Flake as ambassador to Turkey MORE (R-Ariz.) has introduced a competing bill, the Secure It Act.

When originally proposed, S. 3414 received pushback from industry groups and some lawmakers concerned about Internet privacy. But Collins said many changes have been made to the bill.

“We have revised our bill in a very substantial way,” Collins said, citing that many of the standards related to the private sector are now optional. “This shows a willingness to adopt changes and we’re still open to changes.”