Reid pushes to end debate on Iran bill

Democrats are pressuring Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale Overnight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale McConnell defends Trump amid backlash: 'He gets picked at every day' MORE (R-Ky.) to cut off debate on legislation that would allow lawmakers to review a final Iran nuclear deal.

Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidImpeachment will reelect Trump Impeachment will reelect Trump Biden faces first crisis as front-runner MORE (D-Nev.) on Monday said it’s time for McConnell to file for cloture on the bill and shelve the dozens of pending amendments, including one that would link the nuclear deal to Iran’s recognition of Israel.

"The majority leader should file cloture now to preserve this legislation. Destructive members within his own party have forced his hand," Reid said. "I support the majority leader in taking this step because it's the only path forward."

Invoking cloture and ending debate on the bill would require 60 votes.

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The future of the Iran bill was thrown in doubt late last week when Sens. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonSenate rejects effort to block Trump's Qatar, Bahrain arms sales Senate rejects effort to block Trump's Qatar, Bahrain arms sales Supporting the military means supporting military spouses MORE (R-Ark.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Hill's Morning Report — Uproar after Trump's defense of foreign dirt on candidates The Hill's Morning Report — Uproar after Trump's defense of foreign dirt on candidates Trump puts GOP in tough spot with remarks on foreign 'dirt' MORE (R-Fla.), who is running for president, used a procedural tactic to force a vote on requiring Iran to publicly support Israel's right to exist.

Democrats and the White House have warned the amendment could derail the underlying legislation, which was the byproduct of negotiations between Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerPress: How 'Nervous Nancy' trumped Trump Press: How 'Nervous Nancy' trumped Trump Amash gets standing ovation at first town hall after calling for Trump's impeachment MORE (R-Tenn.) and Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinProposed bipartisan kidney legislation takes on kidney disease epidemic in America Lawmakers raise security concerns about China building NYC subway cars House votes to boost retirement savings MORE (D-Md.) on the Foreign Relations Committee.

Rubio and Cotton's move has essentially left McConnell with three options: schedule a vote on the Israel amendment, file cloture on the legislation and prevent votes on dozens of Republican amendments, or try and negotiate some other solution with Rubio and Cotton.

Reid chided Rubio for the amendment Monday, saying that "a number of Senate Republicans are prioritizing presidential politics over national security." He suggested that other senators, including Cotton, want to "undermine President Obama."

McConnell had pledged to allow for a "full and open and robust amendment process" on the Iran bill, in line with his promise, after the midterm elections, to change the way the Senate does business.

If McConnell files cloture on the Iran bill, he would spare Democrats from likely having to take more tough votes on amendments ahead of the 2016 elections.

Senators voted last week on two amendments from Republicans. Reid said Democrats are willing to take more votes, but added: "We don't have to. It's not necessary."

While McConnell's office has remained tight-lipped about what the Kentucky Republican will do, a Senate aide told The Hill that cloture could be filled as early as this week.