The Hill's Whip List: Obama has 42 Senate votes for Iran deal
© The Hill

President Obama has enough support in the Senate to save his nuclear deal with Iran.

Forty-two Democratic senators, including two independents who caucus with the party, now publicly support the deal, enough to potentially filibuster any measure of disapproval.

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Under legislation passed earlier this year, Congress has 60 days — until Sept. 17 — to vote on the deal, which places limits on Tehran’s nuclear program in exchange for lifting sanctions. Congress is expected to take up a resolution of disapproval.

Only four Democrats in the upper chamber, Sens. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerHolder, Yates lead letter backing Biden pick for Civil Rights Division at DOJ Capitol Police officer killed in car attack lies in honor in Capitol Rotunda Rep. Andy Kim on Asian hate: 'I've never felt this level of fear' MORE (N.Y.), Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinWhen it comes to the Iran nuclear deal, what's a moderate Democrat to do? Battle lines drawn on Biden's infrastructure plan GOP senator hammers Biden proposal to raise corporate tax rate MORE, Joe ManchinJoe ManchinHouse committee approves DC statehood bill Romney, Sinema teaming up on proposal to raise minimum wage The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden defends Afghanistan withdrawal after pushback MORE (W.Va.) and Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezBottom line The Memo: Biden's five biggest foreign policy challenges Democrats gear up for major push to lower drug prices MORE (N.J.), publicly oppose the Iran deal.

Here’s a list on how senators stand on the Iran deal. The Hill will update this list; please send updates to jcarney@thehill.com and mmali@thehill.com.

This list was last updated on Sept. 8 at 6:06 p.m.

 

DEMOCRATS – YES (42)

Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinMary Trump joining group that supports LGBTQ+ female candidates Johnson says leaving office after 2022 'probably my preference now' Democrats push Biden to include recurring payments in recovery package MORE (Wis.) — "Simply put, I do not believe that rejecting this agreement is in our national security interest," Baldwin said in a statement.

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetDemocrats get good news from IRS Senators press for answers in Space Command move decision Biden announces first slate of diverse judicial nominees MORE (Colo.) — He called the deal a "flawed, but important step" to preventing a nuclear Iran and keeping Israel safe in a statement first reported by the Denver Post.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (Conn.) 

Sen. Cory Booker (N.J.)  “We have now passed a point of no return that we should have never reached, leaving our nation to choose between two imperfect, dangerous and uncertain options,” said Booker in a statement. “Left with these two choices, I nonetheless believe it is better to support a deeply flawed deal, for the alternative is worse.”

Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerBottom line Trump administration halting imports of cotton, tomatoes from Uighur region of China Biden inaugural committee to refund former senator's donation due to foreign agent status MORE (Calif.)  "In my view, this agreement is the only way to ensure that Iran's nuclear program is used exclusively for civilian purposes, which is in the best interest of the United States, Israel and the world," Boxer said in a statement.

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownDemocrats get good news from IRS Senate confirms Gensler to lead SEC Businessman Mike Gibbons jumps into GOP Senate race in Ohio MORE (Ohio) — "This deal is not about trusting the Iranian regime, but instead working with our allies on comprehensive, verifiable restrictions to block Iran's pathways to a nuclear bomb without precipitating another war in the Middle East,” said Brown in a statement first reported by USA Today.

Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellAgainst mounting odds, Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden meets with bipartisan lawmakers for infrastructure negotiations Senate Republicans label Biden infrastructure plan a 'slush fund' MORE (Wash.)

Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate confirms Mallory to lead White House environment council | US emissions dropped 1.7 percent in 2019 | Interior further delays Trump rule that would make drillers pay less to feds Key Democrat says traveler fees should fund infrastructure projects Senate confirms Biden's pick to lead White House environmental council MORE (Del.)  Carper said the deal "beats the likely alternative - war with Iran - hands down," in an op-ed for the News Journal.

Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyDemocrats divided on gun control strategy Senate Democrats call on DHS for details on response to Portland protests Dems' momentum hits quagmire over infrastructure plans MORE, Jr. (Pa.) 

Sen. Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsPavlich: Biden wants 'infrastructure' ­– Republicans should negotiate Schumer warns Democrats can't let GOP block expansive agenda Inflation rears its head amid spending debate MORE (Del.) — "We are better off trying diplomacy first," Coons told the Washington Post.

Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyEverybody wants Joe Manchin Centrist Democrats pose major problem for progressives Biden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big MORE (Ind.) — "I owe it to the men and women of our Armed Forces and to the people of Indiana to have exhausted every other option to stop Iran before we would consider putting any of our servicemembers in harm’s way,” Donnelly said in a statement.

Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinSchumer warns Democrats can't let GOP block expansive agenda Holder, Yates lead letter backing Biden pick for Civil Rights Division at DOJ Biden's gun control push poses danger for midterms MORE (Ill.)  "Finding a diplomatic solution will make our country, our allies and the world a safer place,” said the Senate's No. 2 Democrat.

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinBiden's gun control push poses danger for midterms Caitlyn Jenner exploring bid for California governor: report WokeWorld comes for 'oppressor' Obama: Activists rip school being named after 'deporter in chief' MORE (Calif.)  “I stand behind the U.S. negotiating team and will support this agreement in the Senate,” Feinstein, the ranking member of the Intelligence panel, said Tuesday.

Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart Franken#MeWho? The hypocritical silence of Kamala Harris The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate Dems face unity test; Tanden nomination falls Gillibrand: Cuomo allegations 'completely unacceptable' MORE (Minn.) — “[T]o take the extraordinary step of rejecting it — because of clearly unrealistic expectations, because of a hunger to send Americans into another war, or, worst of all, because of petty partisanship — would be a terrible mistake,” said Franken in an op-ed for CNN.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandIntelligence leaders warn of threats from China, domestic terrorism Jon Stewart accuses VA of being 'an obstacle' to burn pits medical care Family policy that could appeal to the right and the left MORE (N.Y.) — “Our goal has been, and remains, to prevent Iran from developing a nuclear weapon. We have far more ability to achieve that outcome if we approve this deal‎,” said Gillibrand in a statement.

Sen. Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichIntelligence leaders warn of threats from China, domestic terrorism Top academics slam Puerto Rico Self-Determination Act Groups petition EPA to remove ethane and methane from list of compounds exempt from emissions limits MORE (N.M.)  "This deal sets the stage for a safer and more stable Middle East and a more secure United States of America," said Heinrich.

Sen. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampBill Maher blasts removal of journalist at Teen Vogue Centrist Democrats pose major problem for progressives Harrison seen as front-runner to take over DNC at crucial moment MORE (N.D.) — “It isn’t a perfect deal, but it is a good one. Americans deserve to see this deal through,” Heitkamp said in a statement.

Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoAnti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle Biden to tap Erika Moritsugu as new Asian American and Pacific Islander liaison The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - US vaccine effort takes hit with Johnson & Johnson pause MORE (Hawaii) — Hirono said Iran’s nuclear program “will be disabled for many years” under the deal. 

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats back up Biden bid to return to Iran nuclear deal Overnight Defense: Congress looks to rein in Biden's war powers | Diversity chief at Special Operations Command reassigned during probe into social media posts Congress looks to rein in Biden's war powers MORE (Va.) — Kaine called the deal a "dramatic improvement over the status quo."

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Biden nominates former NSA deputy director to serve as cyber czar | Apple to send witness to Senate hearing after all | Biden pressed on semiconductor production amid shortage Apple to send witness to Senate hearing after pushback from Klobuchar, Lee Lobbying world MORE (Minn.)  “While the agreement is by no means perfect, I have concluded that it is our best available option to put the brakes on Iran’s development of a nuclear weapon and that is why I will support it,” said Klobuchar in a statement. “In conjunction with that support I will also push for increased security assistance to Israel and enhanced defense cooperation with our Arab allies to combat terrorism throughout the region.”

Sen. Angus KingAngus KingBipartisan lawmakers signal support for Biden cybersecurity picks Groups petition EPA to remove ethane and methane from list of compounds exempt from emissions limits Lack of cyber funds in Biden infrastructure plan raises eyebrows MORE (I-Maine)  "The current alternatives, if this agreement is rejected, are either unrealistic or downright dangerous and so, based upon what we know now, I intend to vote in favor of the agreement,” King said.

Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyCongress brings back corrupt, costly, and inequitably earmarks Biden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Senate GOP opens door to earmarks MORE (Vt.)  "I know from my conversations with the president and Secretary Kerry and Moniz how difficult this was. I also know from my conversations with them, they were prepared to walk away than settle for a bad deal. ... This is not a bad deal," said Leahy.

Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyDemocrats to offer bill to expand Supreme Court Hillicon Valley: Supreme Court sides with Google in copyright fight against Oracle | Justices dismiss suit over Trump's blocking of critics on Twitter | Tim Cook hopes Parler will return to Apple Store Democrats press Facebook on plans for Instagram for kids MORE (Mass.)  I believe our negotiators achieved as much as they reasonably could, and that if strictly implemented, this plan can be effective," he said in a statement.

Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillGreitens Senate bid creates headache for GOP The Hill's Morning Report - Biden tasks Harris on border; news conference today Missouri Senate candidate Eric Greitens tangles with Hugh Hewitt in testy interview MORE (Mo.)  "This deal isn't perfect and no one trusts Iran, but it has become clear to me that the world is united behind this agreement with the exception of the government of Israel," she said in a statement. "I respect and understand those who oppose it but I have become convinced that it is more dangerous to Israel, America and our allies to walk away in the face of unified world-wide support."

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyLobbying world Face mask PPE is everywhere now — including the ocean Green tech isn't all it's cracked up to be MORE (Ore.)  "I believe the agreement, titled the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), is the best available strategy to block Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon," he said in a statement.  

Sen. Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiBottom line How the US can accelerate progress on gender equity Former Md. senator Paul Sarbanes dies at 87 MORE (Md.) — “No deal is perfect, especially one negotiated with the Iranian regime," she said in a statement. "I have concluded that this Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action is the best option available to block Iran from having a nuclear bomb. For these reasons, I will vote in favor of this deal." Mikulski is also retiring from the Senate. 

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyGiffords group unveils gun violence memorial on National Mall Democrats back up Biden bid to return to Iran nuclear deal Biden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  MORE (Conn.)  “The test for this agreement, then, is simple: is Iran less likely to obtain a nuclear weapon with this deal than without it? Because I answer this question affirmatively, I will support this agreement when it comes before the United States Senate for a vote in September," Murphy said in a statement.

Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurraySchumer kicks into reelection mode Democrats target Trump methane rule with Congressional Review Act Senators eye rollback of Trump methane rule with Congressional Review Act MORE (Wash.)  "I am hopeful that this deal will be implemented and will move us closer to our goal of preventing Iran from developing a nuclear weapon, but I will be monitoring it closely and will be ready to join others in moving quickly on other options if Iran choses to pursue an unacceptable path," she said in a statement.

Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonWhy does Rep. Johnson oppose NASA's commercial human landing system? Trump hands Rubio coveted reelection endorsement in Florida Overnight Defense: Top House Armed Services Republican talks National Guard at Capitol, Afghanistan, more | Pentagon chief visits Afghanistan amid administration's review | Saudis propose Yemen ceasefire MORE (Fla.)  "If the U.S. walks away from this multinational agreement, I believe we would find ourselves alone in the world with little credibility," said Nelson on the Senate floor.

Sen. Gary Peters (Mich.) 

Sen. Jack ReedJack ReedBiden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Overnight Defense: Biden nominating first female Army secretary | Israel gets tough on Iran amid nuclear talks | Army's top enlisted soldier 'very proud' of officer pepper sprayed by police On The Money: CDC extends coronavirus eviction ban through June 30 | Biden to detail infrastructure proposal Wednesday | US won't quickly lift Trump tariffs on China MORE (R.I.)  "No one assumes Iran will change its stripes, which is why the agreement is built on a foundation of intrusive inspections and constant verification," said Reed, the top Democrat on the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Sen. Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidBiden to tap Erika Moritsugu as new Asian American and Pacific Islander liaison White House races clock to beat GOP attacks Harry Reid reacts to Boehner book excerpt: 'We didn't mince words' MORE (Nev.)  "I’m going to do everything in my power to make sure the deal stands,” the Senate minority leader told The Washington Post.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBernie Sanders says he disagrees with Tlaib's call for 'no more police' Briahna Joy Gray: IRS needs proper enforcement mechanisms to tax wealthy Biden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  MORE (I-Vt.)  "This agreement is obviously not all that many of us would have liked but it beats the alternative — a war with Iran that could go on for years," said the 2016 contender for the Democratic nomination.

Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) — "This is the best possible way to deny Iran from acquiring the bomb. It is what is best for the United States, Israel, and peace in the region." 

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - US vaccine effort takes hit with Johnson & Johnson pause GOP lawmaker 'encouraged' by Biden's Afghanistan strategy Biden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  MORE (N.H.)  “Rejecting this agreement would leave us with no credible non-military options for stopping Iran’s nuclear weapons program,” said Shaheen in a statement.

Sen. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowFive things to watch on Biden infrastructure plan Senators introduce bipartisan bill to expand electric vehicle charging tax credit Bottom line MORE (Mich.) — “I have determined that the imminent threat of Iran having a nuclear weapon outweighs any flaws I see in the international agreement. For this reason, I must support the agreement," Stabenow said in a statement.

Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterLobbying world The Hill's Morning Report - Biden's infrastructure plan triggers definition debate Lawmakers say fixing border crisis is Biden's job MORE (Mont.) — Tester called the deal “the only option right now,” according to Dennis Bragg, a reporter for local station KPAX.

Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallOregon senator takes center stage in Democratic filibuster debate Bipartisan bill seeks to raise fees for public lands drilling OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Haaland courts moderates during tense confirmation hearing | GOP's Westerman looks to take on Democrats on climate change | White House urges passage of House public lands package MORE (N.M.)  "I urge my colleagues to support this agreement," Udall said in a floor speech. "We have a choice between this deal or no deal. I do not believe we will get another chance."

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerIntelligence leaders push for mandatory breach notification law Intelligence leaders warn of threats from China, domestic terrorism Wray: FBI opens investigation into China every 10 hours MORE (Va.)  “This agreement is just the beginning, and not the end, of our combined international efforts to keep Iran free of nuclear weapons," said Warner in a statement.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenForgiving K in school loans would free 36 million student borrowers from debt: data IRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting trillion Biden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  MORE (Mass.)  “The question now before Congress — the only question before Congress — is whether the recently announced nuclear agreement represents our best available option for preventing Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon,” Warren told The Boston Globe. “I am convinced that it does.”

Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseLawmakers say fixing border crisis is Biden's job Democrats wrestle over tax hikes for infrastructure Democrats look to impose capital gains tax at death MORE (R.I.)  "Short of war, with all its dramatic uncertainties and terrible costs, I do not see another pathway to impose a nuclear weapons-free Iran," said Whitehouse in a statement.

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenDemocrats get good news from IRS IRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting trillion The first Southern state legalizes marijuana — what it means nationally MORE (Ore.) 

 

DEMOCRATS - NO (4)

Sen. Ben Cardin (Md.)  "This is a close call, but after a lengthy review, I will vote to disapprove the deal," he said in an op-ed in the Washington Post.

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.)  "For me, this deal had to be about more than preventing Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon for the next 10-15 years. For me, this deal had to address Iran’s terrorist actions," said Manchin in a statement.

Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezBottom line The Memo: Biden's five biggest foreign policy challenges Democrats gear up for major push to lower drug prices MORE (N.J.)  “I have looked into my own soul and my devotion to principle may once again lead me to an unpopular course, but if Iran is to acquire a nuclear bomb, it will not have my name on it,” said Menendez, a senior member of the Foreign Relations Committee.

Sen. Charles Schumer (N.Y.) — "If Iran’s true intent is to get a nuclear weapon, under this agreement, it must simply exercise patience. After ten years, it can be very close to achieving that goal, and, unlike its current unsanctioned pursuit of a nuclear weapon, Iran’s nuclear program will be codified in an agreement signed by the United States and other nations," Schumer, likely the next Democratic leader, said in a statement. Schumer's opposition is a blow to the administration's effort to win over Democrats.

 

REPUBLICANS – NO (54)

Sen. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderSenate GOP faces retirement brain drain The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality Blunt's retirement deals blow to McConnell inner circle MORE (Tenn.) — “I will vote to disapprove the president’s nuclear agreement with Iran because it does not sufficiently restrict Iran’s nuclear program and makes no effort to put a brake on its other conduct as the world’s largest state sponsor of terrorism," he said in a statement.

Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteOvernight Defense: NATO expanding troops in Iraq Overnight Defense: New START extended for five years | Austin orders 'stand down' to tackle extremism | Panel recommends Biden delay Afghanistan withdrawal Study group recommends Biden delay Afghanistan withdrawal MORE (N.H.)  "We need to require them to dismantle their program. ... What we will have here is more proliferation in the Middle East,” she tweeted.

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSenate GOP to face off over earmarks next week Biden outreach on infrastructure met with Republican skepticism Sunday shows preview: Democrats eye passage of infrastructure bill; health experts warn of fourth coronavirus wave MORE (Wyo.) — 

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntSenate GOP to face off over earmarks next week Greitens Senate bid creates headache for GOP Biden outreach on infrastructure met with Republican skepticism MORE (Mo.)  “This is a bad deal for the United States and one that will embolden our adversaries and jeopardize the security of our allies,” Blunt said in a statement. “The stated goal of the negotiations was to ensure Iran never develops the capability to produce a nuclear weapon, yet the president agreed to a deal that does the opposite.”

Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanSenate GOP opens door to earmarks Arkansas governor quietly bucking GOP's dive into culture wars Trump allies line up ahead of potentially bruising primaries MORE (Ark.)  "We have a responsibility to ensure that Iran never achieves its goal of becoming a nuclear power. This deal give us little confidence that we will be successful in this regard,” said Boozman.

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrFormer Gov. Pat McCrory enters GOP Senate race in North Carolina Lara Trump leads GOP field in North Carolina Senate race, poll shows Former North Carolina governor set to launch Senate bid MORE (N.C.)  "I will not support this agreement and, as the Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, I will continue my efforts to ensure that we fully understand Iran’s capabilities and intentions,” said Burr.

Sen. Bill Cassidy (La.)  “This deal won’t just jeopardize our security, but it will also hurt our economy. It would allow Iran to export oil but we can’t,” Cassidy told the Shreveport Times, explaining his opposition.

Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsExperts see 'unprecedented' increase in hackers targeting electric grid Intel heads to resume worldwide threats hearing scrapped under Trump Lack of cyber funds in Biden infrastructure plan raises eyebrows MORE (Ind.)  "Congress should reject this bad deal," said Coats in a statement.

Sen. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Bottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (Miss.) 

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate confirms Mallory to lead White House environment council | US emissions dropped 1.7 percent in 2019 | Interior further delays Trump rule that would make drillers pay less to feds Anti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle On The Money: Senate confirms Gensler to lead SEC | Senate GOP to face off over earmarks next week | Top Republican on House tax panel to retire MORE (Maine)  Collins called the deal "fundamentally flawed."

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerFox News inks contributor deal with former Democratic House member Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain Roy Blunt won't run for Senate seat in 2022 MORE (Tenn.)  “Congress should reject this deal and send it back to the president,” said the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee in a Washington Post op-ed.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynIntelligence leaders push for mandatory breach notification law Senate GOP signal they won't filibuster debate of hate crimes bill Application portal for venue grants down for five days with no updates MORE (Texas)  "The alternative to this deal is a better deal," Cornyn told reporters on a conference call earlier this month. "This deal is not a good deal in my view."

Sen. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonAnti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle Tim Scott to participate in GOP event in Iowa Exclusive: GOP senators seek FBI investigation into Biden Pentagon nominee MORE (Ark.)  Cotton called the deal a “terrible, dangerous mistake” in an appearance on "Morning Joe" and vowed senators would kill the agreement.

Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoOn The Money: Inflation rears its head amid spending debate | IRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting T | Restaurants fret labor shortage IRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting trillion Trump faces test of power with early endorsements MORE (Idaho)  “I am completely opposed to this agreement,” Crapo said at a town hall, according to the Idaho State Journal.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzAnti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle Senate GOP to face off over earmarks next week Biden's DOJ civil rights nominee faces sharp GOP criticism MORE (Texas)  The 2016 presidential candidate called it a "staggeringly bad deal." "It is a fundamental betrayal of the security of the United States and of our closest allies, first and foremost Israel," he said.

Sen. Steve Daines (Mont.)  “Congress should vote down the deal and uphold our commitment to our national security and send a clear message that we cannot consider a deal that is so lacking in transparency and accountability,” said Daines in an op-ed for the Helena Independent Record.

Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality Lummis adopts 'laser eyes' meme touting Bitcoin Senate swears-in six new lawmakers as 117th Congress convenes MORE (Wyo.) — “Do you trust the Iranians? I haven’t found one yet who does,” said at an event in Wyoming, according to the Cody Enterprise."

Sen. Joni Ernst (Iowa)  "This to me is a pathway to nuclear armament for Iran," Ernst told CNN when asked why she opposed the deal. "This deal does not stop them from developing nuclear capabilities."

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFive reasons why US faces chronic crisis at border Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain Former GOP lawmaker: Republican Party 'engulfed in lies and fear' MORE (Ariz.)  Flake has been an ally of the administration on its Cuba policy and was lobbied by the White House to back the Iran deal.

Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerAgainst mounting odds, Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden meets with bipartisan lawmakers for infrastructure negotiations This week: Congress returns with lengthy to-do list MORE (Neb.)  “While the president argued that we ‘give nothing up’ by ‘testing’ whether this agreement will constrain Iran’s nuclear ambitions, I disagree,” Fischer said in a statement. “The international sanctions regime took years to assemble and remains the most effective method of imposing costs on Tehran for their destabilizing behavior."

Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (Colo.)  "Deal lifts the arms embargo against Iran, the world's largest state sponsor of terror. And the more detail we learn, the worse it seems,” Gardner tweeted.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate confirms Mallory to lead White House environment council | US emissions dropped 1.7 percent in 2019 | Interior further delays Trump rule that would make drillers pay less to feds The Memo: Biden puts 9/11 era in rear view Senate confirms Biden's pick to lead White House environmental council MORE (S.C.)  "The deal is far worse than I ever dreamed it could be and will be a nightmare for the region, our national security and eventually the world at large,” the 2016 contender told Bloomberg News.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyAnti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle On The Money: Senate confirms Gensler to lead SEC | Senate GOP to face off over earmarks next week | Top Republican on House tax panel to retire Democrats get good news from IRS MORE (Iowa)  “I’ve always been skeptical about an agreement with Iran that fails to fully dismantle its nuclear program. This is a country that sponsors terrorism and has a history of hiding its nuclear program from outside inspectors.”

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchPress: Forget bipartisanship — it's dead! Privatization of foster care has been a disaster for children Remembering Ted Kennedy highlights decline of the Senate MORE (Utah) 

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (Nev.) 

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court declines to hear challenge to Obama marine monument designation | Interior reverses course on tribal ownership of portion of Missouri river | White House climate adviser meets with oil and gas companies Senate GOP pushes back on list of participants in oil and gas leasing forum Small cities fret over feds redefining metro areas MORE (N.D.) — “All along I’ve believed our best chance to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon is strong sanctions until they absolutely agree to give up their nuclear program with anywhere, anytime inspections,” Hoeven told the Grand Forks Herald.

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - US vaccine effort takes hit with Johnson & Johnson pause Biden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Biden defense budget criticized by Republicans, progressives alike MORE (Okla.)  “I do not trust Iran who has been the leading state sponsor of terrorism for generations, and I have no faith that President Obama’s deal will change the irrational and dangerous behaviors of Iran's government leaders,” according to a statement.

Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonFive big takeaways on Georgia's new election law Warnock: 'Almost impossible to overstate' importance of voting rights legislation Top Georgia Republican says he won't run for Senate MORE (Ga.)  "I have said from day one that I will not be part of any agreement that allows the Iranians to develop a nuclear weapon," Isakson said in a statement.

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonPelosi: Dropping 9/11-style Jan. 6 commission an 'option' amid opposition Wisconsin state Treasurer Sarah Godlewski launches Senate bid Biden picks vocal Trump critics to lead immigration agencies MORE (Wis.) — "I will vote to disapprove this awful and dangerous agreement," he said in a statement.

Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkDuckworth announces reelection bid Brave new world: Why we need a Senate Human Rights Commission  Senate majority battle snags Biden Cabinet hopefuls MORE (Ill.)  “If Congress doesn't stop this bad deal, the American people will be left with a nuclear Iran and a nuclear arms race in the Middle East. Congress can and should insist on a better deal,” said Kirk in a Chicago Tribune op-ed. Kirk is a top Democratic target in 2016.

Sen. James Lankford (Okla.) — "This is a bad deal for America and I have decide [sic] to vote against it and do whatever I can to defeat this agreement,” said Lankford in a statement on his Facebook page.

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeBiden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Hillicon Valley: Biden nominates former NSA deputy director to serve as cyber czar | Apple to send witness to Senate hearing after all | Biden pressed on semiconductor production amid shortage Apple to send witness to Senate hearing after pushback from Klobuchar, Lee MORE (Utah) — "The agreement...that he has negotiated is a bad deal. I intend to do everything I can to stop it," Lee said during a town hall in Utah on Sept. 1.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainCongress brings back corrupt, costly, and inequitably earmarks Trump knocks CNN for 'completely false' report Gaetz was denied meeting The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - Biden, lawmakers start down a road with infrastructure MORE (Ariz.)  McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said the upper chamber would have the 60 votes to vote down the deal.

Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Memo: Biden puts 9/11 era in rear view Anti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle Greitens Senate bid creates headache for GOP MORE (Ky.)  “The comprehensive nuclear agreement announced today appears to further the flawed elements of April’s interim agreement because the Obama administration approached these talks from a flawed perspective: reaching the best deal acceptable to Iran, rather than actually advancing our national goal of ending Iran's nuclear program," said the majority leader.

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoSenate confirms Biden's pick to lead White House environmental council Senate GOP to face off over earmarks next week Biden outreach on infrastructure met with Republican skepticism MORE (W.Va.) 

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranAnti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle Senate GOP signal they won't filibuster debate of hate crimes bill Democrats work to pick up GOP support on anti-Asian hate crimes bill MORE (Kan.) — “My best guess is that Congress, by a majority vote, will reject this agreement,” Moran said at a town hall, according to the Topeka Capital-Journal. “I will vote that way. I think this agreement is horrific.”

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump mocks Murkowski, Cheney election chances Biden picks Obama alum for No. 2 spot at Interior Biden outreach on infrastructure met with Republican skepticism MORE (Alaska) — "Iran got the most out of this negotiation and gave the least. Iran's strategy of nuclear extortion has not been disabled. To the contrary, it has been rewarded," she said in a statement.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulAnti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle Fauci on Tucker Carlson vaccine comments: 'Typical crazy conspiracy theory' Republicans need to stop Joe Biden's progressive assault on America MORE (Ky.) — "The proposed agreement with Iran is unacceptable and I will vote against the agreement," the 2016 contender tweeted.

Sen. David Perdue (Ga.) "This deal won’t prevent Iran from becoming a nuclear weapons state — it just delays it," said Perdue on July 23. "As I’ve said all along, I cannot support any deal that allows Iran to become a nuclear weapons state. Not now, not in 10 years, not ever."

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate confirms Mallory to lead White House environment council | US emissions dropped 1.7 percent in 2019 | Interior further delays Trump rule that would make drillers pay less to feds Senate confirms Biden's pick to lead White House environmental council Biden outreach on infrastructure met with Republican skepticism MORE (Ohio)  "The agreement falls far short of our own stated goals and that of the international community," said Portman in a statement first reported by The Columbus Dispatch. "This is another example of another red-line the Administration has drawn but failed to honor.”

Sen. Jim RischJim Elroy RischGOP lawmakers block Biden assistance to Palestinians Lack of cyber funds in Biden infrastructure plan raises eyebrows The Hill's Morning Report - Biden shifts on filibuster MORE (Idaho) "This deal falls disastrously short of what the Obama Administration originally promised and gives the Iranian government what it desires,” Risch said in a statement. “The West will have to live with a nuclear Iran and will abandon our closest ally, Israel, under this horribly flawed agreement.”

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSenate GOP faces retirement brain drain Roy Blunt won't run for Senate seat in 2022 Lobbying world MORE (Kan.) 

Sen. Mike Rounds (S.D.) — "I feel very uncomfortable with it. I think it's a mistake," said Rounds in August, according to the Argus Leader. "I think they got out-negotiated and I think, in doing so, it's not a good deal for the United States.”

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Memo: Biden puts 9/11 era in rear view Intelligence leaders push for mandatory breach notification law Intelligence leaders warn of threats from China, domestic terrorism MORE (Fla.)  "I expect that a significant majority in Congress will share my skepticism of this agreement and vote it down,” said the 2016 contender.

Sen. Ben Sasse (Neb.)  “Sadly, the Administration just lit the fuse for a nuclear arms race in the Middle East,” Sasse said in a statement. “We all know Iran’s neighbors will not sit idly as the world's largest state-sponsor of terror becomes a nuclear-threshold state.”

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottTim Scott to participate in GOP event in Iowa Shocking killing renews tensions over police Democrat: 'Registration, engagement' are keys to toppling Sen. Tim Scott in South Carolina MORE (S.C.) — "It's hard to make a good deal with bad actors, and this #IranDeal leads us down a dangerous path," Scott tweeted.

Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsBiden picks vocal Trump critics to lead immigration agencies The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Biden administration should resist 'slush-fund' settlements MORE (Ala.)

Sen. Richard Shelby (Ala.) — "Well I think it's a disaster,” Shelby told Alabama TV station WVTM. "Ultimately it was a bad deal. ... If Putin's for it, why would we be for it?" 

Sen. Dan Sullivan (Alaska) — "Principal objective of Iran negotiations was to keep Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. This #IranDeal does NOT do that," he tweeted.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenate GOP to face off over earmarks next week Biden outreach on infrastructure met with Republican skepticism McConnell seeks to end feud with Trump MORE (S.D.) — "A nuclear armed Iran is a threat to the United States, and an agreement that allows Iran to retain all the components necessary to build a nuclear bomb is not a good deal for America and should be rejected," he said in a statement.

Sen. Thom Tillis (N.C.)  The freshman senator tweeted his concerns: "Democrats & Republicans share grave concerns over the bad #IranDeal & Congress has a responsibility to do everything it can to stop it."

Sen. Pat Toomey (Pa.) — "This deal would give Iran the capacity to inflict harm in much more destructive ways.  I will do everything I can to defeat this deal, and I encourage everyone to do the same," Toomey wrote in an op-ed.

Sen. David VitterDavid Bruce VitterBiden inaugural committee to refund former senator's donation due to foreign agent status Bottom line Lysol, Charmin keep new consumer brand group lobbyist busy during pandemic MORE (La.) — Vitter tweeted, "I think this #Iran agreement is a really, really bad deal for America, for Israel, and for freedom."

Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - Biden, lawmakers start down a road with infrastructure OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan | House GOP's planned environmental bills drop Democratic priorities | Advocates optimistic Biden infrastructure plan is a step toward sustainability On The Money: Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan | Democrats debate tax hikes on wealthy | Biden, Congress target semiconductor shortage MORE (Miss.)  Wicker said he would vote against the deal because he didn’t trust Iran’s leaders to keep up their end according to Mississippi station WAPT. “When you’re dealing with somebody, you consider the past conduct of who you’re negotiating with … the people in charge of Iran have shown no indication that they’re trustworthy,” he said.