McConnell tees up vote on cybersecurity bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellWhat Democrats should say about guns This week: House Dems voting to hold Barr, Ross in contempt Juan Williams: GOP in a panic over Mueller MORE (R-Ky.) is teeing up a cybersecurity bill, paving the way for a first vote on Wednesday.

The Republican leader filed cloture on the motion to proceed to the long-stalled Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA).

ADVERTISEMENT

The move comes after a preliminary deal on amendments was reached. The move, if successful, could help get the bill passed before senators leave for a five-week break.

Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrHillicon Valley: Senate bill would force companies to disclose value of user data | Waters to hold hearing on Facebook cryptocurrency | GOP divided on election security bills | US tracking Russian, Iranian social media campaigns GOP senators divided over approach to election security GOP frets about Trump's poll numbers MORE (R-N.C.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDem senators demand GOP judicial group discloses donors Senate Democrats skipping Pence's border trip Senate confirms Trump's 9th Circuit pick despite missing blue slips MORE (D-Calif.), the top two lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee, on Friday circulated a managers’ amendment that would address some of the privacy concerns that have slowed down the bill since March.

But Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenAdvocates frustrated over pace of drug price reform 2020 Democrats push tax hike on wealthy investors Hillicon Valley: FTC reportedly settles with Facebook for B fine | Trump calls to regulate Facebook's crypto project | Court rules Pentagon can award B 'war cloud' contract | Study shows automation will hit rural areas hardest MORE (D-Ore.) suggested Monday that he still has doubts.

"My concern is that this bill, in its present form, will create more problems than it solves, and it would be a mistake to bring it up without agreeing to an inclusive process for considering relevant amendments," he said.

Wyden added that the deal "does not fix the provision of this bill that allow private companies to hand large volumes of their customers' personal information over to the government with only a cursory review."

This story was updated at 6:46 p.m.