The Senate on Thursday rejected a short-term spending bill that would defund Planned Parenthood, thwarting the opening move by Republican leaders to avoid a government shutdown on Oct. 1.

Senators voted 47-52 on ending debate on the short-term continuing resolution, well short of the 60 votes needed. The legislation would have funded the government through Dec. 11.

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The vote divided Republicans, with eight of them breaking ranks. Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteUS, allies must stand in united opposition to Iran’s bad behavior American military superiority will fade without bold national action Five possible successors to Mattis MORE (N.H.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGraham: 'Handful' of GOP senators will vote to block Trump's emergency declaration Dems set up Tuesday vote to block Trump's emergency declaration The Hill's Morning Report — Emergency declaration to test GOP loyalty to Trump MORE (Maine), Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonInviting Kim Jong Un to Washington Senate approves border bill that prevents shutdown 'Morning Joe' host quizzes Howard Schultz on price of a box of Cheerios MORE (Ark.), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds MORE (Nev.) Mark KirkMark Steven KirkThe global reality behind 'local' problems Dems vow swift action on gun reform next year This week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill MORE (Ill.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiThe Hill's Morning Report — Emergency declaration to test GOP loyalty to Trump Don’t look for House GOP to defy Trump on border wall Senate Dems to introduce resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration MORE (Alaska), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThe Hill's Morning Report — Emergency declaration to test GOP loyalty to Trump The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump escalates fight with NY Times The 10 GOP senators who may break with Trump on emergency MORE (Ky.) and Ben Sasse (Neb.) all voted against moving forward.

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Energy: Trump ends talks with California on car emissions | Dems face tough vote on Green New Deal | Climate PAC backing Inslee in possible 2020 run Dems face tough vote on Green New Deal Gabbard cites ‘concerns’ about ‘vagueness’ of Green New Deal MORE (W.Va.) was the only Democrat to vote in favor.

After the vote, Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKids confront Feinstein over Green New Deal Trump selects Kelly Craft for United Nations ambassador Union leader says Green New Deal would make infrastructure bill ‘absolutely impossible’ MORE (R-Ky.) filed a new short-term spending bill that would fund the government and Planned Parenthood.

"I regret the Democratic leadership determined a crisis would be necessary to advance a policy aim of growing the government and that our colleagues decided accordingly to block every single funding bill," McConnell said. "We've been forced to pursue a continuing resolution as a result."

The majority leader could file cloture on the new funding bill in the afternoon. That could set the stage for a final vote early next week.

One senator who could drag out the process is Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzInviting Kim Jong Un to Washington Trump endorses Cornyn for reelection as O'Rourke mulls challenge O’Rourke not ruling out being vice presidential candidate MORE.

The Texas Republican, who is running for president, has slammed Republican leadership during the funding fight, telling reporters that they “will support 100 percent of the priorities of Democrats.”

Cruz could try to force weekend work by objecting to a request to adjourn on Friday, but he could be rebuffed by a majority vote.

The presidential hopeful has reasons of his own to avoid weekend work, as he is currently scheduled to campaign in Iowa on Saturday.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchThe FDA crackdown on dietary supplements is inadequate Orrin Hatch Foundation seeking million in taxpayer money to fund new center in his honor Mitch McConnell has shown the nation his version of power grab MORE (R-Utah), questioned as to whether the Senate would work this weekend, said "no." Asked if he was sure, he replied, "yeah, I'm pretty sure."

The White House, meanwhile, reiterated its pledge to veto any spending bill that reaches President Obama's desk without funding for Planned Parenthood.

“By eliminating Federal funding for a major provider of health care, the Senate amendment to H.J.Res. 61 would limit access to health care for women, men, and families across the Nation, and disproportionately impact low-income individuals,” the Office of Management and Budget said in a statement.

Senate Democrats, and even some Republicans, slammed Thursday’s vote, suggesting it was a waste of time with less than a week left before government funding expires and federal workers are furloughed — something that last happened in 2013.

Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidHarry Reid says he won’t make 2020 endorsement until after Nevada caucus Sanders hires veteran progressive operative to manage 2020 bid Constitutional conservatives need to oppose the national emergency MORE (D-Nev.) said Thursday’s vote was the latest in a line of Republican “publicity stunts.”

“Instead of voting today on a bipartisan way forward, we’ll have another failed vote,” he said. “Republicans should abandon their commitment to fruitless votes and pass a clean funding bill.”

Cecile Richards, the president of Planned Parenthood, said Thursday's vote "should send the message loud and clear to the House of Representatives that Americans overwhelmingly support the care that Planned Parenthood provides."

The new funding bill is expected to have the votes to pass the Senate, though Cruz and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who is also running for president, have pledged to vote against it.

But it remains to be seen whether the spending bill can pass the House.

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerEx-GOP lawmaker joins marijuana trade group Crowley, Shuster moving to K Street On unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 MORE (R-Ohio) is under intense pressure from conservative lawmakers to stand firm on defunding Planned Parenthood.

More than 30 House conservatives have pledged to vote against any funding bill that includes Planned Parenthood, spurred by a series of controversial undercover videos dealing with the organization’s handling of fetal tissue.

With chatter of a potential coup against the Speaker growing, BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerEx-GOP lawmaker joins marijuana trade group Crowley, Shuster moving to K Street On unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 MORE is treading carefully.

He has yet to say whether he will schedule a vote on a bill that does not defund Planned Parenthood, though a decision could be announced when House Republicans gather Friday morning for a conference meeting.

Boehner would likely need Democratic votes to pass such a bill, given the expected defections on the Republican side.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynSenate plots to avoid fall shutdown brawl Inviting Kim Jong Un to Washington Trump endorses Cornyn for reelection as O'Rourke mulls challenge MORE (R-Texas) predicted that the Senate would “quickly” send something to the House, where lawmakers will “have to figure out what they can do.”

"The House has got their own process right now, and I think they're kind of waiting to see what we do," added Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThunePolls: Hiking estate tax less popular than taxing mega wealth, income Will Trump sign the border deal? Here's what we know Key GOP senator pitches Trump: Funding deal a 'down payment' on wall MORE (R-S.D.).

This story was updated at 3:46 p.m.