Senate votes to defund Planned Parenthood
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The Senate on Thursday rejected an amendment to the ObamaCare repeal bill that would have allowed federal funding for Planned Parenthood.

The measure sponsored by three Senate Republicans would have stripped language from the bill blocking federal funds for Planned Parenthood. It fell short by 3 votes, 48-52.

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Sens. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkThe global reality behind 'local' problems Dems vow swift action on gun reform next year This week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill MORE (R-Ill.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiCain says he 'won't run away from criticism' in push for Fed seat Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed License to discriminate: Religious exemption laws are trampling rights in rural America MORE (R-Alaska), who are both up for reelection next year, sponsored the amendment along with centrist Republican Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Collins: Mueller report includes 'an unflattering portrayal' of Trump GOP senator: 'No problem' with Mueller testifying MORE (Maine). They were the only three Republicans to back it along with all but one Democrat.

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOn The Money: Cain 'very committed' to Fed bid despite opposition | Pelosi warns no US-UK trade deal if Brexit harms Irish peace | Ivanka Trump says she turned down World Bank job Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed Pro-life Christians are demanding pollution protections MORE (D-W.Va.) broke ranks to side with Senate Republicans.

The proposal would have struck the section of the bill that blocks federal funding for Planned Parenthood for one year while redirecting it other community health centers.

The Senate previously tabled an amendment from Sens. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayHillicon Valley: Washington preps for Mueller report | Barr to hold Thursday presser | Lawmakers dive into AI ethics | FCC chair moves to block China Mobile | Dem bill targets 'digital divide' | Microsoft denies request for facial recognition tech Dems introduce bill to tackle 'digital divide' Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates MORE (D-Wash.) and Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOn The Money: Inside the Mueller report | Cain undeterred in push for Fed seat | Analysis finds modest boost to economy from new NAFTA | White House says deal will give auto sector B boost Government report says new NAFTA would have minimal impact on economy Hillicon Valley: Washington preps for Mueller report | Barr to hold Thursday presser | Lawmakers dive into AI ethics | FCC chair moves to block China Mobile | Dem bill targets 'digital divide' | Microsoft denies request for facial recognition tech MORE (D-Ore.) that sought to continue funding for Planned Parenthood. Their bill also would have created a fund to support the safety of women's health clinics for staff and patients in the wake of last week's deadly shooting at a Colorado Planned Parenthood facility. 

The Senate will vote later on Thursday for final passage on ObamaCare repeal. If the bill is approved, it faces a certain veto from President Obama and will not become law.

The three GOP senators have remained tightlipped about whether or not they will support the ObamaCare repeal package if the provision defunding Planned Parenthood remains intact. 

Kirk previously voted against a stand-alone bill to strip money from the organization. 

Collins defended her amendment ahead of the vote, suggesting that without it hundreds of health clinics across the country could close. 

“I want to make clear that our amendment does not include any new spending. it does increase taxes, and it retains the current Hyde amendment language which prohibits the use of federal funds for abortions except in cases of rape, incest or when the life of the mother is at risk,” she said.  

The centrist senators have repeatedly voiced concerns about tying the larger repeal legislation to the separate battle over Planned Parenthood, which has drawn scrutiny after a series of video suggested it mishandled fetal tissue. 

But Republican leadership remained confident that they will have the 51 votes needed to get the reconciliation proposal through the upper chamber on Thursday.

Predicting that the legislation would be successful, Sen. John CornynJohn Cornyn Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Trump struggles to reshape Fed Congress opens door to fraught immigration talks MORE (R-Texas) said that leadership has been working to unify their members.

“We've been working very closely to try to come up with a consensus piece of legislation,” he told reporters earlier this week.  

 This story was updated at 3:01 p.m.