Rubio, Graham, Cruz lead Senate in missed votes

As the 2016 presidential election heats up, Republican hopefuls are racking up absences in the Senate. 

Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio unloads on Turkish chef for 'feasting' Venezuela's Maduro: 'I got pissed' For Poland, a time for justice Judiciary Democrat calls for additional witnesses to testify on Kavanaugh MORE (Fla.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin Graham GOP senator: Kavanaugh accuser 'moving the goalposts' Collins: Kavanaugh accuser should 'reconsider,' testify on Monday Grassley willing to send staff to California to speak with Kavanaugh accuser MORE (S.C.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSinger Leon Bridges to join Willie Nelson in performing at O’Rourke rally Election Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls Poll: Beto O'Rourke leads Cruz by 2 points in Texas Senate race MORE (Texas) missed more roll call votes during 2015 than any other senators, according to data released this week from C-SPAN. 
 
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Rubio has the worst attendance record, missing 35 percent, or 120 of the 339 roll votes, during the past year, according to GovTrack. 
 
Meanwhile, Graham, who suspended his campaign earlier this month, missed 28 percent of roll call votes during 2015, and Cruz missed 24 percent. 
 
While many of the absences were on procedural votes, the three senators also missed votes on nominations or major legislation. 
 
For example, Cruz drew widespread criticism earlier this year over missing the final vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general; Rubio most recently missed votes on the end-of-the-year government spending bill
 
Rubio's attempt to run for president while also keeping up his Senate duties has received constant criticism, coming under the media spotlight as early as January when he missed a vote on the Keystone XL pipeline to fundraise in California.
 
His Senate voting record is also drawing increased scrutiny from his rivals for the Republican presidential nomination. 
 
In a TV ad this week, a super-PAC supporting former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush's White House bid highlighted Rubio's absence from a classified briefing after the November terrorist attacks in Paris. 
 
 
Paul, who is also running for the presidential nomination, missed 6 percent of Senate roll call votes this year. 
 
The campaigns have repeatedly defended their candidates' voting records, suggesting that the senators focus on votes where they can make an impact.
 
Comparatively, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: Trump's exclusive interview with Hill.TV | Trump, intel officials clash over Russia docs | EU investigating Amazon | Military gets new cyber authority | Flynn sentencing sparks new questions about Mueller probe READ: President Trump’s exclusive interview with Hill.TV Keeping up with Michael Avenatti MORE, the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination, missed 23 percent of the Senate's roll call votes during the same point in the 2008 presidential election, according to GovTrack. Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump administration weakens methane pollution standards for drilling on public lands Another recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief R-E-S-P-E-C-T: One legacy of Franklin and McCain is up to us MORE (R-Ariz.), who won the Republican nomination, missed 56 percent. 
 
 
With senators missing about 1 percent of votes on average, Sanders's absences put him in the Senate's top 10 for missed votes in 2015, according to C-SPAN.
 
 
Vitter, who has announced he won't run for reelection, spent most of the year making a failed bid for governor in Louisiana. Reid was absent from the Senate for weeks earlier this year after suffering an eye injury. 
  
On average, senators missed approximately 50 of the 339 votes, according to GovTrack.