Senate rejects Paul’s push to audit the Fed
© Greg Nash

The Senate on Tuesday rejected Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP Rep. Cawthorn says he wants to 'prosecute' Fauci Writer: Fauci, Paul clash shouldn't distract from probe into COVID-19 origins S.E. Cupp: 'The politicization of science and health safety has inarguably cost lives' MORE’s (R-Ky.) controversial proposal to audit the Federal Reserve, turning aside a bill that has drawn the ire of the business community and the White House. 

The Senate voted 53-44 on taking up the presidential hopeful’s measure. Sixty votes were needed to move forward.

ADVERTISEMENT

Paul won some bipartisan support for the legislation, with Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTo break the corporate tax logjam, tax overinflated CEO pay Will Pence primary Trump — and win? Grassley pressured to run as Democrats set sights on Iowa MORE (I-Vt.), another presidential candidate, voting in favor. Democratic Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinManaging the US dollar to pay for congressional infrastructure plans Duckworth, Pressley introduce bill to provide paid family leave for those who experience miscarriage Senate Democrats call for Medicaid-like plan to cover non-expansion states MORE (Wis.) backed the bill as well.

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioBipartisan congressional commission urges IOC to postpone, relocate Beijing Games Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks Senators introduce bipartisan bill to secure critical groups against hackers MORE (R-Fla.), who is also running for president, supported moving forward with Paul’s legislation, while White House rival Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia next week Here's evidence the Senate confirmation process is broken MORE (R-Texas) missed the vote. Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (Tenn.) was the only Republican to vote against the bill. 

Paul had pressured Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWill Pence primary Trump — and win? Kavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law Biden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks MORE (D-Mass.) to back his proposal, portraying it as a test of their commitment to taking on Wall Street.

“We’ve had a lot of Democrats who claim that they’re concerned about big banks and big banks controlling things and a revolving door between Wall Street and big banks and the Federal Reserve,” Paul told reporters during a conference call Monday. “We’ll see if any of those loud voices — Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren — are they loud voices that really are for more oversight of the banking system?” 

Warren voted against the bill. 

Sanders, who in the past worked with Paul’s father, former Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas), on similar “Audit the Fed” legislation, said the new bill would help build on his 2010 push to require an audit of the central bank’s emergency lending.

“Requiring the Government Accountability Office to conduct a full and independent audit of the Fed each and every year, would be an important step towards making the Federal Reserve a more democratic institution that is responsive to the needs of ordinary Americans rather than the billionaires on Wall Street,” the Independent senator said in a statement. 

Paul’s legislation, which would increase congressional oversight of the Fed and require it to undergo an audit by the Government Accountability Office, faced an uphill battle. Ahead of the vote, only 26 Republicans had signed on as co-sponsors.

Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinBiden: Pathway to citizenship in reconciliation package 'remains to be seen' DACA court ruling puts weight of immigration reform on Democrats New York gun rights case before Supreme Court with massive consequences  MORE (D-Ill.) told The Hill while he expected the vote would be close, “at this point I think it’s going to be difficult for the Republicans to get 60 votes.”

Democrats suggested that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGrassley pressured to run as Democrats set sights on Iowa House Democrats grow frustrated as they feel ignored by Senate Democrats question GOP shift on vaccines MORE (R-Ky.), who supported the bill, was wasting floor time by making Paul’s legislation the first bill of 2016. McConnell backs Paul’s presidential run.

Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidWarner backing 'small carve-out' on filibuster for voting rights Senate hopefuls embrace nuking filibuster Biden fails to break GOP 'fever' MORE (D-Nev.) dismissed Paul’s proposal as a “sham.”

“Republicans have been trying to undermine the Federal Reserve mandate to strive toward full employment,” he added on Tuesday morning.

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe White House on Cleveland Indians' name change: 'We certainly support their change of name' Key Biden ally OK with dropping transit from infrastructure package MORE (D-Ohio), the ranking member of the Banking Committee, added ahead of the vote that the legislation “really solves nothing but to politicize the Fed.” 

For Paul, the vote in the Senate was a chance to grab the spotlight ahead of a weekend trip to New Hampshire, the second contest in the Republican primary.

After a promising start, he has struggled to break out in the field and is now coming in near the bottom of the polls. 

Fox Business Network announced that the Kentucky Republican didn’t qualify for the main-stage debate on Thursday night, and Paul has refused to participate in the earlier undercard bout.

Republicans broadly argue that recent policy decisions by the Federal Reserve — including its handling of the 2008 financial crisis — underscore the need for more oversight of the powerful central bank.

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), who is up for reelection in November, said that while he had been skeptical of Paul’s legislation, “the dangerous behavior that the Fed has engaged in for years now means they have squandered the right to be independent.”

Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.), the chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, had previously voiced opposition to Paul’s proposal, but voted Tuesday to move forward with it.

“I think we ought to debate it,” he told reporters on Monday evening. “I’m interested in oversight and that might be what he’s interested in.”

Federal Reserve officials have fought fiercely against Paul’s legislation, suggesting that it would allow Congress to weigh in on financial policy “in real time.”

Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen sent a letter to Senate leadership late last week saying that she opposes the bill and warning, if signed into law, it could damage the economy.

The White House last year called Paul’s proposal “dangerous.”

“What that bill is about is about Congress supplanting its judgment as to what monetary policy should be,” said Jason FurmanJason FurmanBiden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks GOP seeks to make Biden synonymous with inflation Facebook antitrust victory poses big test for new FTC chief MORE, chairman of Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. “Congress shouldn’t be telling the Fed what to do with monetary policy.”

Business groups had also expressed strong opposition to the bill.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the most powerful industry lobby in Washington, issued an open letter urging senators to vote against the legislation, calling it “unnecessary.”

“Creating outside pressures that could politicize monetary policy decisions would likely harm the market foundations needed to fuel the free enterprise system,” wrote Bruce Josten, the Chamber’s executive vice president of government affairs.

Tuesdays’ vote was the first time Paul’s legislation was allowed to come up. 

Conservative groups rallied behind the measure, with FreedomWorks legislative affairs manager Josh Withrow saying late last week that if central banks “have nothing to hide from the American people, they shouldn’t fear transparency.”

This story was updated at 7:45 p.m.