Reid said he hoped to get an agreement with Republicans to hold a final vote on the bill Thursday night so that the Senate could recess until after Thanksgiving.

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The Sportsmen’s Act increases hunters' and fishermen’s access to federal lands. To get more Democrats on board, the bill includes conservation measures, such as establishing a National Fish Habitat Board and extending the sale of stamps, the proceeds from which go to conservation funds that help elephants, tigers, rhinos, great apes and marine turtles.

"Sportsmen and -women across Montana and the nation are calling for responsible decisions that strengthen our outdoor economy and secure our outdoor heritage for future generations," Tester said. "This measure does just that, taking good ideas from Republicans and Democrats to protect our hunting and fishing traditions and safeguard our most treasured places. I will keep pushing to get it across the finish line."

Sens. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerFox's Ingraham transitioning longtime radio show to podcast Former Dem aide makes first court appearance on charges of posting GOP senators' info online Ex-House intern charged with 'doxing' GOP senators during Kavanaugh hearing MORE (D-Calif.), Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by PhRMA — Worries grow about political violence as midterms approach President Trump’s war on federal waste American patients face too many hurdles in regard to health-care access MORE (R-Okla.), John CornynJohn CornynSenate barrels toward showdown over Trump's court picks Dem gains put Sunbelt in play for 2020 Trump’s backing may not be enough on criminal justice reform MORE (R-Texas), Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.), Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeTrump’s backing may not be enough on criminal justice reform Senators introduce Trump-backed criminal justice bill Senators return to Washington intent on action against Saudis MORE (R-Utah), Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezPro-Israel organizations should finally seek payback against Iran deal Dems Trump lowers refugee goal to 30,000, he must meet it Blame Senate, not FBI, for Kavanaugh travesty MORE (D-N.J.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrump’s relationship with Saudi crown prince under pressure Rand Paul: 'Evidence is overwhelming' that Saudi crown prince was involved in Khashoggi murder Sunday shows preview: New members preview agendas after Democratic House takeover MORE (R-Ky.), Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedTrump defends border deployment amid fresh scrutiny Dems wonder if Sherrod Brown could be their magic man Overnight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — Border deployment 'peaked' at 5,800 troops | Trump sanctions 17 Saudis over Khashoggi killing | Senators offer bill to press Trump on Saudis | Paul effort to block Bahrain arms sale fails MORE (D-R.I.), Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump labels Schiff ‘little Adam Schitt’ Top House Oversight Dem says he will do ‘anything and everything’ to make Mueller’s findings public Watchdog group demands release of Whitaker's financial disclosures MORE (R-Ala.) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) voted against the motion.

Sessions said one reason he wasn't supporting the motion was because the bill would allow the Department of Interior to set the price of duck stamps rather than Congress — something he said the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee rejected.

"It gives the Department of Interior, unelected bureaucrats, power to decided how much to charge for a duck stamp," Sessions said. "Which has always been determined by Congress, not government bureaucracy."

One part of the bill that’s proven controversial is a provision from Rep. Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungGOP approves rule for Don Young Midterm results shake up national map Don Young holds on to House seat in Alaska MORE (R-Alaska), H.R. 991, that would allow American hunters to bring home polar-bear carcasses being stored in Canada because of the ban on trophy imports.

Sens. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryTrump set to have close ally Graham in powerful chairmanship Kerry: ‘People are going to die' due to Trump's withdrawal from Paris climate deal Kerry tears into Trump for skipping visit to military cemetery: ‘Truculent child president’ MORE (D-Mass.) and Scott Brown (R-Mass.) introduced an amendment that would strike that portion of the bill. Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) co-sponsored the amendment, among others.

“I find this very disturbing,” Blumenthal said of the polar-bear portion of the bill. “This provision of the Sportsmen’s Act undermines current wildlife protections and further imperils an already threatened species by encouraging future killings for sport.”

Polar bears are listed as a threatened species by the Fish and Wildlife Services.

In addition to dealing with polar-bear trophies, the bill removes ammunition and tackle from the federal list regulating waste that contains lead, among other things.

This aricle was updated at 11 a.m. to include Sen. Sessions' remarks.