Rubio remotely blocks Mexico ambassador nominee while campaigning
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Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioLessons from the front line — Florida's fight with sea level rise SNAP, airlines among final hurdles to coronavirus stimulus deal Senior State Department official headed to Peru to bring home stranded Americans, Rubio says MORE (R-Fla.) on Thursday remotely blocked the Senate from confirming President Obama's ambassador to Mexico, even though he is campaigning in South Carolina.

Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallDemocrats press Pompeo to help Americans stranded abroad amid coronavirus Democrats press FEC pick to recuse himself from Trump matters Overnight Energy: Watchdog blasts planning behind BLM relocation | Progress on Senate energy bill | Dems eye two measures for inclusion ahead of vote MORE (D-N.M.) tried to get unanimous consent to confirm Roberta Jacobson, who was nominated in June. Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeTrump on Romney's negative coronavirus test: 'I am so happy I can barely speak' Romney says he tested negative for coronavirus, will remain in quarantine Paul defends actions before coronavirus diagnosis, calls for more testing MORE (R-Utah) objected, noting that he was doing so on behalf of Rubio, a GOP presidential candidate.

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Jacobson, who is currently the State Department's assistant secretary for Western Hemisphere affairs, has drawn flack from Republicans and some Democrats over her role in leading the Obama administration's negotiations with Cuba to restore relations. 
 
Rubio has repeatedly criticized the president's handling of the island country, suggesting Obama is relaxing decades-old travel and trade rules without requiring political or human rights reforms in return. 
 
He also wrote a letter to Jacobson last month about reports that a Hellfire missile was sent to Cuba after being used during a European training exercise. 
 
"The fact that the administration, including you, have apparently tried to withhold this information from the congressional debate and public discussion over U.S.-Cuba policy is disgraceful," he said at the time. 
 
A State Department official said Congress was briefed on the issue in February 2015.
 
Udall, separately, defended Jacobson, calling her a "highly qualified career nominee." 
 
"She's ready to serve. She has solid support on both sides of the aisle," he said.