The Senate late Thursday night approved a Republican amendment that would prohibit the transfer of terrorist detainees from Guantánamo Bay to U.S. prisons.

Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteLobbying World On the Trail: Senate GOP hopefuls tie themselves to Trump GOP fears Trump backlash in suburbs MORE (R-N.H.) introduced Amendment 3245, which would prevent the Department of Defense from using funds to move suspected terrorists from Gitmo facilities to prisons within the United States.

Ayotte said Thursday that she feared that those presumed terrorists would seek legal rights in U.S. courts. She added that the Gitmo facility is far more secure because it’s protected by the military.

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Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinEncryption helps America work safely — and that goes for Congress, too Democratic lawmakers demand government stop deporting unaccompanied children DOJ probing stock transactions made by lawmakers ahead of coronavirus crisis: report MORE (D-Calif.) said she opposed the amendment, which passed on a 54-41 vote, because there are already more than 100 terrorists being securely held in federal prisons today.

“This is what our federal prisons do and they do it well,” Feinstein said before the vote.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham asks colleagues to support call for China to close wet markets Justice IG pours fuel on looming fight over FISA court Trump says he's considering restricting travel to coronavirus 'hot spots' MORE (R-S.C.) questioned why Feinstein and others opposing the amendment would want to bring suspected terrorists to the United States during a time of war.

“We don’t want these crazy bastards brought here to the United States,” Graham said. “They want to steal your way of life, not steal your car.

“Have you lost your mind?”

Sen. Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinSenator Tom Coburn's government oversight legacy The Trumpification of the federal courts Global health is the last bastion of bipartisan foreign policy MORE (D-Mich.) called the amendment “veto bait” because President Obama said he’d veto the defense bill if it included this provision. One of Obama’s campaign promises in 2008 was to close down the Gitmo facility, which requires moving those being detained.

Democratic Sens. Jim Webb (Va.), Ben Nelson (Neb.), Daniel Inouye (Hawaii) and Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) voted with Republicans for the amendment.

The Senate is scheduled to continue amendment work on the National Defense Authorization Act, S. 3254, Thursday night, with hopes of finishing work by the end of the week. The defense bill funds U.S. military operation.

The following amendments were passed by unanimous consent or voice-vote:

  • 3090, introduced by Lieberman, which continues the funding of firefighter and first-responders' emergency equipment through FEMA.
  • 2942, introduced by McCaskill, which expands whistleblower protections to non-defense contractor and grantee employees.
  • 2973, introduced by Inhofe, which expresses the sense of the Senate on training of mental health counselors for members of the Armed Forces, veterans, and their families.
  • 3059, introduced by Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), which requires a report on the establishment of a joint Armed Forces historical storage and preservation facility.
  • 3072, introduced by Inhofe, which expresses the sense Senate on increasing the cost-effectiveness of training exercise for members of the Armed Forces.
  • 3230, introduced by Boxer, which deals with public diplomacy.

—This post was updated Nov. 30 at 12:51 p.m.