The Senate voted to grant Russia permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) status on Thursday.

On a 92-4 vote, the Senate approved the Russia trade bill with broad bipartisan support.

“We have to take very difficult votes in this chamber, but this is not one of them,” Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBottom line Bottom line The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation MORE (D-Mont.) said before the vote. “PNTR is good for United States jobs ... and this is strong human rights legislation.”

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Rep. Dave Camp (R-Mich.) introduced the Russia and Moldova Jackson-Vanik Repeal and Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act, H.R. 6156, which is necessary for U.S. businesses to benefit from lower tariffs after Russia joined the World Trade Organization (WTO) this summer.

The same bill passed in the House last month with broad support — it was approved on a 365-43 vote.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanOvernight Defense: Pompeo pressed on move to pull troops from Germany | Panel abruptly scraps confirmation hearing | Trump meets family of slain soldier Pompeo, lawmakers tangle over Germany troop withdrawal Senate report says Russian oligarchs evading U.S. sanctions through big-ticket art purchases MORE (R-Ohio), a former U.S. trade representative to the WTO, said he supported the measure because it would help generate new U.S. jobs in manufacturing and farming industries.

“We need to do all we can that we make sure our farmers and workers have access to the 95 percent of consumers that are outside of the U.S. borders,” Portman said on the floor Wednesday evening. “Without passing this legislation, our farmers and workers will get left behind.”

Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinCongress eyes tighter restrictions on next round of small business help Senate passes extension of application deadline for PPP small-business loans 1,700 troops will support Trump 'Salute to America' celebrations July 4: Pentagon MORE (D-Md.) had hoped to include human rights language that would have imposed travel and financial sanctions on alleged human rights violators around the world, but the House-passed version included language that sanctions only violators in Russia.

Cardin said passing the bill would make sure the United States was “on the right side of history” and was a step forward in protecting human rights globally.

Sens. Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinDemocrats: A moment in history, use it wisely America's divide widens: Ignore it no longer Senator Tom Coburn's government oversight legacy MORE (D-Mich.), Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedControversial Trump nominee placed in senior role after nomination hearing canceled Overnight Defense: Pompeo pressed on move to pull troops from Germany | Panel abruptly scraps confirmation hearing | Trump meets family of slain soldier Senate panel scraps confirmation hearing for controversial Pentagon nominee at last minute MORE (D-R.I.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseLiability shield fight threatens to blow up relief talks Democrats call for McConnell to bring Voting Rights Act to floor in honor of Lewis Hillicon Valley: Russian hackers return to spotlight with vaccine research attack | Twitter says 130 accounts targeted in this week's cyberattack | Four fired, dozens suspended in CBP probe into racist, sexist Facebook groups MORE (D-R.I.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersGOP lawmaker: Democratic Party 'used to be more moderate' 4 reasons why Trump can't be written off — yet Progressives lost the battle for the Democratic Party's soul MORE (I-Vt.) voted against the trade bill.

Levin said Wednesday that he would have preferred that the Senate vote on its version of the bill, which included the sanctions worldwide, rather than just affecting Russia.

“I don’t understand why we’re not taking up the Senate version and applying these standards universally,” Levin said on the Senate floor Wednesday night. “The only answer I can get is that the House might not pass the Senate version. Well, we should do what we think is right.”

The Magnitsky language — largely supported by Democrats — would require the administration to identify officials involved in Russian tax lawyer Sergei Magnitsk’s death, make those names public, and freeze the U.S. assets related to those officials. Magnitsky was investigating corruption and theft of the Russian government when he was jailed.

Senate Finance Committee ranking member Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchFive takeaways as panel grills tech CEOs Trump awards medal of freedom to former congressman, Olympian Jim Ryun Mellman: Roberts rescues the right? MORE (R-Utah) said that portion of the bill was “a powerful new tool to battle corruption” in Russia.

“If the [Obama] administration uses these tool effectively we will see ourselves in the future working side-by-side with a Russia free of corruption,” Hatch said.

The bill now goes to President Obama’s desk for his signature. The administration said it supports the measure.

Several senators said they wished the Obama administration would be firmer with Russia on sanitary restrictions — Russia has not allowed some U.S. produce and meat imports because of sanitary restrictions, despite having similar sanitary standards as the United States. The bill includes language that urges trade negotiators to continue to work on making sure there are not “unjustifiable” reasons for why U.S. agriculture products can’t be exported to Russia.