The Senate voted to grant Russia permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) status on Thursday.

On a 92-4 vote, the Senate approved the Russia trade bill with broad bipartisan support.

“We have to take very difficult votes in this chamber, but this is not one of them,” Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBaucus backing Biden's 2020 bid Bottom line Overnight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms MORE (D-Mont.) said before the vote. “PNTR is good for United States jobs ... and this is strong human rights legislation.”

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Rep. Dave Camp (R-Mich.) introduced the Russia and Moldova Jackson-Vanik Repeal and Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act, H.R. 6156, which is necessary for U.S. businesses to benefit from lower tariffs after Russia joined the World Trade Organization (WTO) this summer.

The same bill passed in the House last month with broad support — it was approved on a 365-43 vote.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenators pen op-ed calling for remote voting amid coronavirus pandemic Some Democrats growing antsy as Senate talks drag on Coronavirus stimulus talks hit setback as crisis deepens MORE (R-Ohio), a former U.S. trade representative to the WTO, said he supported the measure because it would help generate new U.S. jobs in manufacturing and farming industries.

“We need to do all we can that we make sure our farmers and workers have access to the 95 percent of consumers that are outside of the U.S. borders,” Portman said on the floor Wednesday evening. “Without passing this legislation, our farmers and workers will get left behind.”

Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinDemocratic senator asks Pompeo to stop saying 'Wuhan virus' Small-business rescue package expected to swell to 0 billion or more McConnell sets Friday night deadline for bipartisan deal on stimulus MORE (D-Md.) had hoped to include human rights language that would have imposed travel and financial sanctions on alleged human rights violators around the world, but the House-passed version included language that sanctions only violators in Russia.

Cardin said passing the bill would make sure the United States was “on the right side of history” and was a step forward in protecting human rights globally.

Sens. Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinThe Trumpification of the federal courts Global health is the last bastion of bipartisan foreign policy Can the United States Senate rise to the occasion? Probably not MORE (D-Mich.), Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedOvernight Defense: Stimulus bill has .5B for Pentagon | Money would be blocked from border wall | Esper orders 60-day freeze for overseas troop movements Senate panel switches to 'paper hearings' amid coronavirus pandemic Rand Paul's coronavirus diagnosis sends shockwaves through Senate MORE (D-R.I.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Energy: Coronavirus package punts on environmental fights | Court sides with tribes in Dakota Access Pipeline case | Trump officials walk away from ethanol court fight Coronavirus package punts on environmental fights Overnight Energy: House stimulus aims to stem airline pollution | Environmental measures become sticking point in Senate talks | Progressives propose T 'green stimulus' MORE (D-R.I.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersCoronavirus makes the campaign season treacherous for Joe Biden Biden could be picking the next president: VP choice more important than ever Democrats eye additional relief checks for coronavirus MORE (I-Vt.) voted against the trade bill.

Levin said Wednesday that he would have preferred that the Senate vote on its version of the bill, which included the sanctions worldwide, rather than just affecting Russia.

“I don’t understand why we’re not taking up the Senate version and applying these standards universally,” Levin said on the Senate floor Wednesday night. “The only answer I can get is that the House might not pass the Senate version. Well, we should do what we think is right.”

The Magnitsky language — largely supported by Democrats — would require the administration to identify officials involved in Russian tax lawyer Sergei Magnitsk’s death, make those names public, and freeze the U.S. assets related to those officials. Magnitsky was investigating corruption and theft of the Russian government when he was jailed.

Senate Finance Committee ranking member Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchBottom line Bottom line Trump administration backs Oracle in Supreme Court battle against Google MORE (R-Utah) said that portion of the bill was “a powerful new tool to battle corruption” in Russia.

“If the [Obama] administration uses these tool effectively we will see ourselves in the future working side-by-side with a Russia free of corruption,” Hatch said.

The bill now goes to President Obama’s desk for his signature. The administration said it supports the measure.

Several senators said they wished the Obama administration would be firmer with Russia on sanitary restrictions — Russia has not allowed some U.S. produce and meat imports because of sanitary restrictions, despite having similar sanitary standards as the United States. The bill includes language that urges trade negotiators to continue to work on making sure there are not “unjustifiable” reasons for why U.S. agriculture products can’t be exported to Russia.