Sen. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryThe Memo: Democrats confront prospect of long primary Democrats debate how to defeat Trump: fight or heal GOP senators press State Department for Hunter Biden, Burisma records MORE (D-Mass.) said the emergency-spending bill for Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts won’t pass unless money for fisheries is included.

“This legislation is not going to pass without the inclusion of this money, point blank,” Kerry said on the floor Wednesday.

The Senate started consideration this week of H.R. 1 as a vehicle to provide $60.4 billion to Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts, but some conservatives have said the bill has unrelated and unnecessary spending measures, during a time when lawmakers are trying to make spending cuts.

The bill includes $150 million for fisheries in states that have disaster declarations, including Mississippi and Alaska — states not hit by Hurricane Sandy. In October, Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeast hard, affecting several states and their infrastructure.

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Kerry, along with Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOn The Money: US paid record .1B in tariffs in September | Dems ramp up oversight of 'opportunity zones' | Judge hints at letting House lawsuit over Trump tax returns proceed Overnight Energy: EPA watchdog slams agency chief after deputy fails to cooperate in probe | Justices wrestle with reach of Clean Water Act | Bipartisan Senate climate caucus grows Overnight Defense: Trump, Erdogan confirm White House meeting | Public impeachment hearings set for next week | Top defense appropriator retiring MORE (D-N.H.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDemocratic senators seek documents on Trump's alleged call for Barr press conference Senate committee advances budget reform plan Bipartisan Enzi-Whitehouse budget bill a very bad fix for deficits MORE (D-R.I.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska political mess has legislators divided over meeting place Former GOP chairman Royce joins lobbying shop Lobbying world MORE (D-Alaska) and Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiLobbying World Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates Raskin embraces role as constitutional scholar MORE (D-Md.), said Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by PhRMA — Worries grow about political violence as midterms approach President Trump’s war on federal waste American patients face too many hurdles in regard to health-care access MORE (R-Okla.) has introduced an amendment to the bill that would jeopardize the funding for those fisheries that have been hit by bad weather and reduced stocks this year.

The Democratic senators said this $150 million wasn’t pork, but disaster relief that has been “thoroughly vetted.”

“I like earmarks, but this is not an earmark,” Begich said. “This takes nothing away from Superstorm Sandy … but this was also a disaster in a different making.”

Later Wednesday, Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsHillicon Valley: Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract in court | State antitrust investigation into Google expands | Intel agencies no longer collecting location data without warrant Intelligence agencies have stopped collecting cellphone data without warrants: letter This week: Democrats churn toward next phase of impeachment fight MORE (R-Ind.) offered an alternative emergency-funding bill that would not include money for fisheries. His version would cost roughly $24 billion.

The Coats bill does not contain money for storm damage, and eliminates funding for other past disasters. His office highlighted that it eliminates a grab-bag of random funding in the Democratic bill that has come under some scrutiny. The Democratic bill has money for fisheries in Alaska, to fix museum roofs in D.C., for wildfires in Colorado, for tree planting and for the Legal Services Corp., Coats’s office noted.

The Coats bill does not offset the emergency spending with cuts elsewhere. It remains to be seen if House Republicans will require offsets if they get to the Sandy bill at all in the lame-duck session, or what level they will seek to pass in funding.

The Senate is continuing amendment work on the measure. Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidThe Memo: Democrats confront prospect of long primary Bottom Line Lobbying world MORE (D-Nev.) has said he wants to finish work on the bill this week, while House Republicans have said they want to take a longer look at the president's proposal to make sure there isn't any unnecessary spending.

--Erik Wasson contributed to this report.

--This report was originally published at 8:48 p.m. on Wednesday and last updated at 7:27 a.m. on Thursday.