Sen. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryOvernight Energy: Farmers say EPA reneged on ethanol deal | EPA scrubs senators' quotes from controversial ethanol announcement | Perry unsure if he'll comply with subpoena | John Kerry criticizes lack of climate talk at debate John Kerry calls out lack of climate questions at debate Democrats' debate divisions open the race to new (or old) faces MORE (D-Mass.) said the emergency-spending bill for Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts won’t pass unless money for fisheries is included.

“This legislation is not going to pass without the inclusion of this money, point blank,” Kerry said on the floor Wednesday.

The Senate started consideration this week of H.R. 1 as a vehicle to provide $60.4 billion to Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts, but some conservatives have said the bill has unrelated and unnecessary spending measures, during a time when lawmakers are trying to make spending cuts.

The bill includes $150 million for fisheries in states that have disaster declarations, including Mississippi and Alaska — states not hit by Hurricane Sandy. In October, Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeast hard, affecting several states and their infrastructure.

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The Democratic senators said this $150 million wasn’t pork, but disaster relief that has been “thoroughly vetted.”

“I like earmarks, but this is not an earmark,” Begich said. “This takes nothing away from Superstorm Sandy … but this was also a disaster in a different making.”

Later Wednesday, Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray Coats281 lobbyists have worked in Trump administration: report Former intelligence chief Coats rejoins law firm Remembering leaders who put country above party MORE (R-Ind.) offered an alternative emergency-funding bill that would not include money for fisheries. His version would cost roughly $24 billion.

The Coats bill does not contain money for storm damage, and eliminates funding for other past disasters. His office highlighted that it eliminates a grab-bag of random funding in the Democratic bill that has come under some scrutiny. The Democratic bill has money for fisheries in Alaska, to fix museum roofs in D.C., for wildfires in Colorado, for tree planting and for the Legal Services Corp., Coats’s office noted.

The Coats bill does not offset the emergency spending with cuts elsewhere. It remains to be seen if House Republicans will require offsets if they get to the Sandy bill at all in the lame-duck session, or what level they will seek to pass in funding.

The Senate is continuing amendment work on the measure. Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTrump thanks Reid for warning Democrats not to underestimate him Reid warns Democrats not to underestimate Trump Harry Reid predicts Trump, unlike Clinton, won't become more popular because of impeachment MORE (D-Nev.) has said he wants to finish work on the bill this week, while House Republicans have said they want to take a longer look at the president's proposal to make sure there isn't any unnecessary spending.

--Erik Wasson contributed to this report.

--This report was originally published at 8:48 p.m. on Wednesday and last updated at 7:27 a.m. on Thursday.