The Senate started consideration this week of H.R. 1 as a vehicle to provide $60.4 billion to Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts, but some conservatives have said the bill brings up unnecessary spending measures during a time when lawmakers are trying to make spending cuts.

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Republicans raised a budget point of order on $3.4 billion of the bill because it would spend more money than was allowed by the Budget Control Act. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) said some of the mitigation spending projects would then have to be offset by other cuts down the road. The motion to waive the budget point of order failed on a 57-34 vote — 60 votes were needed.

"The question before us is when we’re running trillion-dollar deficits, will we really add $60 billion more," Toomey said.

Republican Sens. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP loads up lame-duck agenda as House control teeters Congress moves to ensure the greater availability of explosives detecting dogs in the US McConnell sets key Kavanaugh vote for Friday MORE (Mo.), Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranThe Hill's Morning Report — Kavanaugh ordeal thrusts FBI into new political jam GOP Senate candidate to African Americans: Stop begging for 'government scraps' Trump endorses Hyde-Smith in Mississippi Senate race MORE (Miss.), Richard Shelby (Ala.), Olympia Snowe (Maine) and David VitterDavid Bruce VitterSenate panel advances Trump nominee who wouldn't say if Brown v. Board of Education was decided correctly Planned Parenthood targets judicial nominee over abortion comments Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge MORE (La.) voted with Democrats to waive the budget point of order.

The Obama administration has called for a $60.4 billion package, and the Senate version fulfills that request. Republicans have questioned why there is some money for things such as Head Start centers, transportation improvements and park clean up, among others.

Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsHillicon Valley: Intel chief wants tech, government to work more closely | Facebook doesn't believe foreign state behind hack | New net neutrality lawsuit | Reddit creates 'war room' to fight misinformation Hillicon Valley: Russia-linked hackers hit Eastern European companies | Twitter shares data on influence campaigns | Dems blast Trump over China interference claims | Saudi crisis tests Silicon Valley | Apple to let customers download their data Overnight Defense — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — Senators seek US intel on journalist's disappearance | Army discharged over 500 immigrant recruits in one year | Watchdog knocks admiral over handling of sexual harassment case MORE (R-Ind.) introduced a Republican alternative to the bill, which would cost $24 billion. He said his version strips out spending that is unrelated to Hurricane recovery and non-emergency provisions. His bill will be considered as a possible amendment.

In October, Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeast, causing widespread damage in several states. New York and New Jersey were hit hardest, with thousands of people losing their homes.

“It’s been 50 days since Hurricane Sandy hit our shores,” Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandAffordable housing set for spotlight of next presidential campaign Overnight Defense — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — Senators seek US intel on journalist's disappearance | Army discharged over 500 immigrant recruits in one year | Watchdog knocks admiral over handling of sexual harassment case Pentagon watchdog knocks top admiral for handling of sexual harassment case MORE (D-N.Y.) said earlier in the week. “We need to act swiftly.”

Republicans said they’re sympathetic to the victims but that they’d rather look more closely at spending. Coats said his bill would allow lawmakers to hold a hearing and pass another spending measure by the end of March.

House Republicans have said they’d prefer to deal with an emergency spending package next year since the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) said it has enough money to get through the winter.