GOP senator 'perplexed' by McConnell's Supreme Court strategy

Republican Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Defense: US to send 1K more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions | Iran threatens to break limit on uranium production in 10 days | US accuses Iran of 'nuclear blackmail' | Details on key defense bill amendments Overnight Defense: US to send 1K more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions | Iran threatens to break limit on uranium production in 10 days | US accuses Iran of 'nuclear blackmail' | Details on key defense bill amendments Senators revive effort to create McCain human rights commission MORE (Maine) said Tuesday she is confused by her party's strategy to block Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland from getting a hearing.

"I must confess that I'm a bit perplexed by his position," she told WGAN, a local radio station, about Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellJon Stewart rips into McConnell for saying he's 'bent out of shape' over 9/11 victim fund Jon Stewart rips into McConnell for saying he's 'bent out of shape' over 9/11 victim fund Tensions with Iran reach new stage over uranium threat MORE (R-Ky.). "I'm not quite sure what his thinking is, but it's clearly one that he believes strongly in."

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While GOP leaders remain committed to not moving Garland's nomination, Collins warned that if Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBroadway play 'Hillary and Clinton' closing early due to low ticket sales Broadway play 'Hillary and Clinton' closing early due to low ticket sales Facing challenge from Warren, Sanders touts strength against Trump MORE becomes the next president, she could nominate a more liberal judge. She also raised alarm at the prospect of GOP front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says 'Failing New York Times' should be held 'fully accountable' over Russia report Trump says 'Failing New York Times' should be held 'fully accountable' over Russia report Trump tweets ICE will begin removing 'millions' of undocumented migrants MORE picking the next justice.

"If the [Republican] nominee is, let's say, that it is Mr. Trump, and he becomes the next president, who knows who his nominee would be. He's rather unpredictable," she added. 

A small group of Republicans have floated a lame-duck vote on Garland if their party loses the election, but McConnell has tried to shut down speculation, saying it wouldn't happen.

Collins, who is not on the Judiciary Committee, quickly came out in support of giving the president's pick a hearing, arguing the "normal process" should be followed. 

"It just seemed to me that there was no basis for saying that no matter who the president nominates we were not going to consider that individual," she said Tuesday.

Her comments put her at direct odds with her party's leadership, as well as most of her Republican colleagues. 

While more than a dozen senators have suggested they are open to meeting with Garland, most say they will use a sit-down to reiterate that the court seat should remain empty until next year. 

Asked if she was "catching hell" for her position, Collins suggested she wasn't, but added, "Obviously the leader's not real happy with me." 

"I'm sure there are some that are unhappy with me, but this is a solemn responsibility," she said. 

Collins will meet with Garland next week.