The Senate passed the emergency-spending bill for Hurricane Sandy relief efforts on Friday night. 

The 62-32 vote came after the Senate worked all day Friday on amendments to H.R. 1, a vehicle to provide $60.4 billion to storm recovery efforts. 

Republican Sens. Scott Brown (Mass.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCheney drama exposes GOP's Trump rifts House to advance appropriations bills in June, July Manchin touts rating as 'most bipartisan senator' MORE (Maine), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (Nev.), John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenGOP sees immigration as path to regain power The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults now eligible for COVID vaccines The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults can get vaccine; decision Friday on J&J vax MORE (N.D.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPollster Frank Luntz: 'I would bet on' Trump being 2024 GOP nominee Trump muddles Republican messaging on Afghanistan Trump drama divides GOP, muddling message MORE (Alaska), Richard Shelby (Ala.), Olympia Snowe (Maine), David VitterDavid Bruce VitterBiden inaugural committee to refund former senator's donation due to foreign agent status Bottom line Lysol, Charmin keep new consumer brand group lobbyist busy during pandemic MORE (La.), Dick Lugar (Ind.), Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Bottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (Miss.), Kay Bailey Hutchison (Texas) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerBiden to meet with GOP senators amid infrastructure push Biden visits local Mexican restaurant to highlight relief program Pelosi slams McCarthy for promoting COVID-19 relief provision MORE (Miss.) voted with Democrats for final passage of the measure. Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorBottom line Everybody wants Joe Manchin Cotton glides to reelection in Arkansas MORE (D-Ark.) was the only Democrat who voted against the bill, but he then changed his vote later Friday evening. The original vote was 61-33 — with his change it is now 62-32.

Some conservatives said the bill still contained unnecessary spending measures during a time when lawmakers are trying to make spending cuts. 

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Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsExperts see 'unprecedented' increase in hackers targeting electric grid Intel heads to resume worldwide threats hearing scrapped under Trump Lack of cyber funds in Biden infrastructure plan raises eyebrows MORE (R-Ind.) introduced a Republican alternative to the bill that would have cost $24 billion instead of $60.4 billion. He said his version would have stripped out spending that is unrelated to hurricane recovery and non-emergency provisions. His bill was voted on as an amendment to H.R. 1, but it failed on a 41-54 vote.

“I don’t believe there is anyone in this chamber who doesn’t understand the devastating effect of Sandy on the Northeast,” Coats said before his amendment was voted on Friday. “But the bill offered by the other side throws out $60-plus billion to deal with future needs.”

Republican Sens. Scott Brown (Mass.), Susan Collins (Maine), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls Sherrod Brown calls Rand Paul 'kind of a lunatic' for not wearing mask Overnight Health Care: WHO-backed Covax gets a boost from Moderna MORE (Ky.) and Olympia Snowe (Maine) voted against Coat’s alternative measure.

In October, Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeast, causing widespread damage in several states. New York and New Jersey were hit hardest, with thousands of people losing their homes.

The bill now heads to the House, where Republicans have said they’d prefer to deal with an emergency-spending package next year since the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) said it has enough money to get through the winter. If the House doesn’t act by Jan. 3, the Senate bill dies. The House will return to Washington on Sunday to continue work on a “fiscal cliff” deal. Democrats could push for the supplemental spending bill to be included in a final deal.

Senators advocating for the large spending package, said it was desperately needed because the Hurricane took place months ago. 

Eight amendments were added to the bill Friday. Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnWasteful 'Endless Frontiers Act' won't counter China's rising influence Congress brings back corrupt, costly, and inequitably earmarks Conservative group escalates earmarks war by infiltrating trainings MORE (R-Okla.) introduced a bipartisan amendment that passed. It would prohibit dead people and anyone with "serious delinquent tax debts" from receiving the any of the federal emergency funds.

Earlier Friday, Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleySenate Democrats push Biden over raising refugee cap Bipartisan Senate group calls for Biden to impose more sanctions on Myanmar junta A proposal to tackle congressional inside trading: Invest in the US MORE (D-Ore.) proposed an amendment that would have reauthorized fire and drought emergency funding for farmers and ranchers. But Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsBiden fills immigration court with Trump hires Trump admin got phone records of WaPo reporters covering Russia probe: report Ex-Sen. Doug Jones joins law and lobbying firm Arent Fox MORE (R-Ala.) raised a budget point of order against that proposal, and the Senate failed to waive it in a 55-40 vote. That vote meant that Merkley’s proposed language would not have been considered emergency spending; as a result, he pulled his amendment.

The article was updated at 7:40 p.m.