The Senate passed the emergency-spending bill for Hurricane Sandy relief efforts on Friday night. 

The 62-32 vote came after the Senate worked all day Friday on amendments to H.R. 1, a vehicle to provide $60.4 billion to storm recovery efforts. 

Republican Sens. Scott Brown (Mass.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSusan Collins says systemic racism isn't 'a problem' in Maine Biden, Cunningham hold narrow leads in North Carolina: poll GOP sees path to hold Senate majority MORE (Maine), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (Nev.), John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenDavis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump Bottom line Bipartisan senators seek funding for pork producers forced to euthanize livestock MORE (N.D.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiAlaska Senate race sees cash surge in final stretch Bitter fight over Barrett fuels calls to nix filibuster, expand court The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Justice Barrett joins court; one week until Election Day MORE (Alaska), Richard Shelby (Ala.), Olympia Snowe (Maine), David VitterDavid Bruce VitterBottom line Lysol, Charmin keep new consumer brand group lobbyist busy during pandemic Bottom line MORE (La.), Dick Lugar (Ind.), Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranObama endorses Espy in Mississippi Senate race Espy wins Mississippi Senate Democratic primary Bottom Line MORE (Miss.), Kay Bailey Hutchison (Texas) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump, Biden blitz battleground states Hillicon Valley: Big Tech hearing the most partisan yet | Rubio warns about foreign election interference | Trump campaign site briefly hacked Tech CEOs clash with lawmakers in contentious hearing MORE (Miss.) voted with Democrats for final passage of the measure. Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorCoronavirus poses risks for Trump in 2020 Tom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 MORE (D-Ark.) was the only Democrat who voted against the bill, but he then changed his vote later Friday evening. The original vote was 61-33 — with his change it is now 62-32.

Some conservatives said the bill still contained unnecessary spending measures during a time when lawmakers are trying to make spending cuts. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsPresident Trump: To know him is to 'No' him Avoiding the 1876 scenario in November Democrat asks intelligence director if Trump's personal debt is security problem MORE (R-Ind.) introduced a Republican alternative to the bill that would have cost $24 billion instead of $60.4 billion. He said his version would have stripped out spending that is unrelated to hurricane recovery and non-emergency provisions. His bill was voted on as an amendment to H.R. 1, but it failed on a 41-54 vote.

“I don’t believe there is anyone in this chamber who doesn’t understand the devastating effect of Sandy on the Northeast,” Coats said before his amendment was voted on Friday. “But the bill offered by the other side throws out $60-plus billion to deal with future needs.”

Republican Sens. Scott Brown (Mass.), Susan Collins (Maine), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrump says ex-staffer who penned 'Anonymous' op-ed should be 'prosecuted' CIA impeachment whistleblower forced to live under surveillance due to threats: report Rand Paul rips 'leftwing media' for focusing on COVID-19 cases: 'Mortality rates are plummeting' MORE (Ky.) and Olympia Snowe (Maine) voted against Coat’s alternative measure.

In October, Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeast, causing widespread damage in several states. New York and New Jersey were hit hardest, with thousands of people losing their homes.

The bill now heads to the House, where Republicans have said they’d prefer to deal with an emergency-spending package next year since the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) said it has enough money to get through the winter. If the House doesn’t act by Jan. 3, the Senate bill dies. The House will return to Washington on Sunday to continue work on a “fiscal cliff” deal. Democrats could push for the supplemental spending bill to be included in a final deal.

Senators advocating for the large spending package, said it was desperately needed because the Hurricane took place months ago. 

Eight amendments were added to the bill Friday. Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnDemocrats step up hardball tactics in Supreme Court fight COVID response shows a way forward on private gun sale checks Inspector general independence must be a bipartisan priority in 2020 MORE (R-Okla.) introduced a bipartisan amendment that passed. It would prohibit dead people and anyone with "serious delinquent tax debts" from receiving the any of the federal emergency funds.

Earlier Friday, Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyFCC reaffirms order rolling back net neutrality regulations Electric vehicles see state-level gains GOP clears key hurdle on Barrett's Supreme Court nomination, setting up Monday confirmation MORE (D-Ore.) proposed an amendment that would have reauthorized fire and drought emergency funding for farmers and ranchers. But Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsGOP former US attorneys back Biden, say Trump 'threat to rule of law' Biden fact checks Trump on 545 families separated at border, calls policy 'criminal' Harris walks fine line on Barrett as election nears MORE (R-Ala.) raised a budget point of order against that proposal, and the Senate failed to waive it in a 55-40 vote. That vote meant that Merkley’s proposed language would not have been considered emergency spending; as a result, he pulled his amendment.

The article was updated at 7:40 p.m.