In a 62-36 vote, the Senate on Monday approved legislation providing $50.7 billion to help New York, New Jersey and other states hit by Hurricane Sandy. 

All 36 "no" votes came from Republicans. GOP Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump holds his last turkey pardon ceremony The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience The Memo: Trump election loss roils right MORE (Tenn.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTwo more parting shots from Trump aimed squarely at disabled workers Trump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right MORE (Maine), Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranAlabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future Hyde-Smith fends off challenge from Espy in Mississippi Obama endorses Espy in Mississippi Senate race MORE (Miss.), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (Nev.), John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Barrasso to seek top spot on Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Forest Service finalizes rule weakening environmental review of its projects | Biden to enlist Agriculture, Transportation agencies in climate fight Meadows meets with Senate GOP to discuss end-of-year priorities Senate advances energy regulator nominees despite uncertainty of floor vote MORE (N.D.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right Whoopi Goldberg blasts Republicans not speaking against Trump: 'This is an attempted coup' MORE (Alaska), Richard Shelby (Ala.), David VitterDavid Bruce VitterBottom line Lysol, Charmin keep new consumer brand group lobbyist busy during pandemic Bottom line MORE (La.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerGOP lawmaker patience runs thin with Trump tactics Republicans start turning the page on Trump era The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump, Biden blitz battleground states MORE (Miss.) voted "yes." 

The House had already approved the measure, so the Senate action sends the bill to President Obama, who has said he will sign it. 

The bill will reach Obama several weeks after supporters had hoped Congress would sign off on the measure. The House did not approve a similar measure in the last days of the previous Congress. 

“It was three months ago that Superstorm Sandy blew up the East Coast,” Sen. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerUS national security policy in the 117th Congress and a new administration Voters say Biden should make coronavirus vaccine a priority: poll New York City subway service could be slashed 40 percent, officials warn MORE (D-N.Y.) said on the floor Monday evening before the vote. “Sandy’s wrath was wide and it was deep. Nearly 300,000 families had their homes damaged. ... We can’t wait any longer, because nothing about this was a game for those families.”

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 The House passed its bill earlier this month in a bipartisan 241-180 vote. 

Unlike a bill approved by the Senate in the last Congress late last year, the House measure did not include money for states outside the Northeast. 

Some Democratic senators complained on Monday that the bill they were approving was not as good as the previous measure. 

“This is not perfect, but it’s a very sound bill,” Senate Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiForeign policy congressional committees need to call more women experts Lobbying World Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates MORE (D-Md.) said. “The bill passed by Senate was by far a superior bill ... but let’s not make the perfect the enemy of the good.”

Republicans argued that separate weather-related disasters in the West should be dealt with separately and not lumped in with this bill. They also accused Democrats of adding “pork” to the bill last December.

“We have a habit of throwing money at things under an emergency category,” Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsLobbying world President Trump: To know him is to 'No' him Avoiding the 1876 scenario in November MORE (R-Ind.) said. “We simply can’t afford to keep doing this.”

Before final passage, the Senate rejected an amendment from Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeLoeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Barrasso to seek top spot on Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Forest Service finalizes rule weakening environmental review of its projects | Biden to enlist Agriculture, Transportation agencies in climate fight MORE (R-Utah) that would have offset the recovery spending by decreasing federal discretionary spending by 0.49 percent for nine years. 

“People have suffered as a result of this storm. My heart goes out to them,” Lee said. “[But] we must also consider how our actions here might have other implications down the road. We have to consider that we are more than $16 trillion in debt.”

Lee’s amendment was defeated 35-62. 

“We have already delayed this further than we should have because we’re arguing about offsets,” Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCassidy wins reelection in Louisiana Bottom line A decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth MORE (D-La.) said. “It has already been three months. ... We should not use disasters to push ideology, and that’s what the other side has been doing.”

Both chambers approved a $9.7 billion bill earlier this month for the National Flood Insurance Program to handle claims related to the storm, bringing the total recovery package to more than $60 billion — the amount the Obama administration originally requested.

The House bill included H.R. 219, which makes changes to disaster assistance intended to allow faster disbursement of disaster aid.