Senate passes broad spending bill with $1.1B in Zika funds

The Senate approved a broad appropriations bill Thursday, including $1.1 billion in Zika virus funds. 

Senators voted 89-8 on the merged Transportation-Housing and Urban Development, military construction and Veterans Affairs spending bill. The overwhelming vote came despite a veto threat from the White House.  

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GOP Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump announces, endorses ambassador to Japan's Tennessee Senate bid Meet the key Senate player in GOP fight over Saudi Arabia Trump says he's 'very happy' some GOP senators have 'gone on to greener pastures' MORE (Tenn.), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Sanders mounts staunch defense of 'Medicare for All' | Biden, Sanders fight over health care heats up | House votes to repeal ObamaCare 'Cadillac Tax' | Dems want details on fetal tissue research ban Hillicon Valley: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency plan | Trump vows to 'take a look' at Google's ties to China | Google denies working with China's military | Tech execs on defensive at antitrust hearing | Bill would bar business with Huawei Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency at hearing MORE (Idaho), Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFlake urges Republicans to condemn 'vile and offensive' Trump tweets Flake responds to Trump, Jimmy Carter barbs: 'We need to stop trying to disqualify each other' Jeff Flake responds to Trump's 'greener pastures' dig on former GOP lawmakers MORE (Ariz.), James Lankford (Okla.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Health care moves to center stage of Democratic primary fight | Sanders, Biden trade sharps jabs on Medicare for All | Senate to vote on 9/11 bill next week | Buttigieg pushes for cheaper insulin Senate to vote on 9/11 victims bill on Tuesday Meghan McCain slams Rand Paul over blocking 9/11 compensation funding: 'This is a disgrace' MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrump faces new hit on deficit Overnight Defense: US shoots down Iranian drone | Pentagon sending 500 more troops to Saudi Arabia | Trump mulls Turkey sanctions | Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Health care moves to center stage of Democratic primary fight | Sanders, Biden trade sharps jabs on Medicare for All | Senate to vote on 9/11 bill next week | Buttigieg pushes for cheaper insulin MORE (Ky.), Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischOvernight Defense: House votes to block Trump arms sales to Saudis, setting up likely veto | US officially kicks Turkey out of F-35 program | Pentagon sending 2,100 more troops to border House votes to block Trump's Saudi arms sale Senate approves long-delayed tax treaties in win for business MORE (Idaho) and Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHouse gears up for Mueller testimony Trump's no racist — he's an equal opportunity offender Press: Acosta, latest to walk the plank MORE (Ala.) voted against the legislation. Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden leads, Warren and Sanders tied for second in new poll Analysis: Harris, Buttigieg and Trump lead among California donations The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants MORE (I-Vt.), Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerOnly four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates Hispanic civil rights icon endorses Harris for president California AG Becerra included in Bloomberg 50 list MORE (D-Calif.), Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzHow to reduce Europe's dependence on Russian energy Cruz calls for 'every penny' of El Chapo's criminal enterprise to be used for Trump's wall after sentencing Conservatives defend Chris Pratt for wearing 'Don't Tread On Me' T-shirt MORE (R-Texas) missed the vote.

The legislation includes more than $190 billion for military construction and veterans and more than $114 billion for transportation and housing programs.

Passage of the bill comes after senators agreed earlier Thursday to attach the Zika money to the spending bill, setting themselves up for a showdown with the House.

Democrats ultimately supported the move after being blocked from passing President Obama’s full $1.9 billion request earlier as part of the massive bill or as a separate piece of legislation.

Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayTrump's new labor chief alarms Democrats, unions Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Sanders mounts staunch defense of 'Medicare for All' | Biden, Sanders fight over health care heats up | House votes to repeal ObamaCare 'Cadillac Tax' | Dems want details on fetal tissue research ban Democrats demand information from White House about fetal tissue research ban MORE (D-Wash.), who spearheaded the Zika proposal, said Thursday she was "disappointed that Republicans refused to work with us to fully fund the president's emergency supplemental proposal."

"It shouldn't have taken us so long to get to this point, but I am pleased that this will move us to a down payment," she said.

But the Zika money drew conservative ire because the costs weren't offset. The House’s $622 million in Zika money is partially paid for by reallocating funding originally meant to combat the Ebola virus.  

Senators also defeated a controversial amendment from Lee that would have defunded HUD’s Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing Rule.

Lee warned the Obama administration’s regulation would have turned the federal government into a “national zoning board.”

“The Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing Rule — which my amendment would defund — is equal parts condescension and willful blindness,” the Utah Republican said Thursday. “[It] is the epitome of the paternalism that informs so much of what happens in Washington, D.C. today.”

But Democrats warned that Lee’s amendment would undercut the federal government’s efforts to make sure housing isn’t based on things including race, gender or religion.

Instead, senators backed an amendment from Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp Trump angry more Republicans haven't defended his tweets: report MORE, which the Maine Republican said would help make sure HUD can’t be a “national zoning authority for every neighborhood in our country.”

The White House threatened this week to veto the legislation, which still needs to be merged with legislation from the House, if it reaches the president’s desk in its current form.

"The administration strongly objects to the inclusion of problematic ideological provisions that are beyond the scope of funding legislation," the Office of Management and Budget said in a statement this week.

The legislation includes measures blocking the president from closing the Guantánamo Bay Naval Station or using funding to build alternative locations within the United States to house detainees.

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump seizes House impeachment vote to rally GOP Pompeo on Senate run: 'I always leave open the possibility that something will change' CNN's Cuomo spars with Kris Kobach over whether Trump's tweet was racist MORE (R-Kan.), a fierce critic of Obama’s plan to close the facility in Cuba, praised those restrictions.

“Although the clock may have run out on the president, I will continue to oppose his ongoing attempts to transfer the detainees at every opportunity,” he said in a statement.