Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right GOP senators unveil bill designating Taliban as terrorist organization MORE (R-Fla.) joined Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate lawmakers let frustration show with Blinken Rand Paul: 'Hatred for Trump' blocking research into ivermectin as COVID-19 treatment Masks and vaccines: What price freedom? MORE's (R-Ky.) ongoing filibuster Wednesday afternoon on the Senate floor, and opened his time with a sly acknowledgment of his now infamous water bottle incident during his rebuttal to the State of the Union.

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Addressing Paul, who had been conducting the filibuster for nearly five hours, Rubio quipped that it was important to stay hydrated.

"Let me give you some free advice: Keep some water nearby," Rubio said.

While giving the Republican response to President Obama's annual address last month, Rubio became parched and grabbed for an off-screen water bottle. The awkward moment became the subject of jokes and ridicule on social media networks and liberal talk show programs.

Speaking Wednesday, Rubio went on to make reference to the winter weather hitting some of the Washington area, quipping that the ongoing filibuster effort was "great for people snowed in at home with nothing better to watch but C-SPAN." The capital city braced for what was expected to be a serious snowstorm on Wednesday, although forecast accumulation never materialized within the city limits.

Paul launched the filibuster Wednesday morning to protest the Obama Administration's refusal to absolutely rule out ever conducting a drone strike against American citizens on U.S. soil. In a letter to the Kentucky lawmaker, Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderDemocrats look to state courts as redistricting battle heats up On The Trail: Census kicks off a wild redistricting cycle Biden under pressure to pick new breed of federal prosecutors MORE said the administration had "no intention of doing so," but believed it had constitutional authority to do so in an “extraordinary circumstance" like Pearl Harbor or the September 11 attacks.

Throughout the proceedings, a bipartisan group of senators, including Rubio, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by National Industries for the Blind - Schumer: Dem unity will happen eventually; Newsom prevails The Memo: Like the dress or not, Ocasio-Cortez is driving the conversation again Ocasio-Cortez defends attendance of Met Gala amid GOP uproar MORE (R-Texas), Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranIt's time for Congress to act before slow mail turns into no mail Kaine says he has votes to pass Iraq War repeal in Senate Seven-figure ad campaign urges GOP to support infrastructure bill MORE (R-Kan.), Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeEconomy adds just 235K jobs in August as delta hammers growth Lawmakers flooded with calls for help on Afghanistan exit Afghanistan fiasco proves we didn't leave soon enough MORE (R-Utah), and Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHouse panel advances key portion of Democrats' .5T bill Advocates call on top Democrats for 0B in housing investments Lobbying world MORE (D-Ore.) have taken time to ask questions of Paul, prolonging the proceedings and giving the Kentucky lawmaker a chance to rest without yielding control of the Senate floor.

Rubio praised Paul on Wednesday, saying the Kentucky senator was performing an important constitutional duty.

"It is a constitutional obligation to ask relevant questions to public policy … if we’re not going to ask these questions, who will?" Rubio said.