Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSunday shows - Biden agenda, Trump impeachment trial dominate Rubio: Trump impeachment trial is 'stupid' The Memo: Biden gambles that he can do it all MORE (R-Fla.) joined Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSunday shows preview: All eyes on Biden administration to tackle coronavirus The Hill's Morning Report - Biden takes office, calls for end to 'uncivil war' Senate confirms Biden's intel chief, giving him first Cabinet official MORE's (R-Ky.) ongoing filibuster Wednesday afternoon on the Senate floor, and opened his time with a sly acknowledgment of his now infamous water bottle incident during his rebuttal to the State of the Union.

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Addressing Paul, who had been conducting the filibuster for nearly five hours, Rubio quipped that it was important to stay hydrated.

"Let me give you some free advice: Keep some water nearby," Rubio said.

While giving the Republican response to President Obama's annual address last month, Rubio became parched and grabbed for an off-screen water bottle. The awkward moment became the subject of jokes and ridicule on social media networks and liberal talk show programs.

Speaking Wednesday, Rubio went on to make reference to the winter weather hitting some of the Washington area, quipping that the ongoing filibuster effort was "great for people snowed in at home with nothing better to watch but C-SPAN." The capital city braced for what was expected to be a serious snowstorm on Wednesday, although forecast accumulation never materialized within the city limits.

Paul launched the filibuster Wednesday morning to protest the Obama Administration's refusal to absolutely rule out ever conducting a drone strike against American citizens on U.S. soil. In a letter to the Kentucky lawmaker, Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Joe Biden's continued 'Russian misinformation' defense of Hunter is conspiracy-level laughable Tyson fires 7 after probe into managers coronavirus betting MORE said the administration had "no intention of doing so," but believed it had constitutional authority to do so in an “extraordinary circumstance" like Pearl Harbor or the September 11 attacks.

Throughout the proceedings, a bipartisan group of senators, including Rubio, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTed Cruz, Seth Rogen trade insults as Twitter spat flares Biden leans on Obama-era appointees on climate Ethics complaint filed against Biggs, Cawthorn and Gosar over Capitol riot MORE (R-Texas), Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden's crisis agenda hits headwinds OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden's Interior Department temporarily blocks new drilling on public lands | Group of GOP senators seeks to block Biden moves on Paris, Keystone | Judge grants preliminary approval for 0M Flint water crisis settlement Bipartisan Senate gang to talk with Biden aide on coronavirus relief MORE (R-Kan.), Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Defense: Austin takes helm at Pentagon | COVID-19 briefing part of Day 1 agenda | Outrage over images of National Guard troops in parking garage Austin sworn in as nation's first Black Pentagon chief The Hill's 12:30 Report: Next steps in the Trump impeachment MORE (R-Utah), and Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Intelligence agency gathers US smartphone location data without warrants, memo says | Democrats seek answers on impact of Russian hack on DOJ, courts | Airbnb offers Biden administration help with vaccine distribution Intelligence agency gathers US smartphone location data without warrants, memo says Senate panel unanimously advances Yellen nomination for Treasury MORE (D-Ore.) have taken time to ask questions of Paul, prolonging the proceedings and giving the Kentucky lawmaker a chance to rest without yielding control of the Senate floor.

Rubio praised Paul on Wednesday, saying the Kentucky senator was performing an important constitutional duty.

"It is a constitutional obligation to ask relevant questions to public policy … if we’re not going to ask these questions, who will?" Rubio said.