The Senate rejected House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanLobbying world John Ratcliffe is the right choice for director of national intelligence — and for America House Democrat calls for halt to lawmakers sleeping in their offices MORE’s (R-Wis.) budget Thursday night.

Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurraySenate votes to reauthorize intel programs with added legal protections The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Zeldin says Congress must help states; Fauci's warning; Dems unveil T bill The Hill's 12:30 Report: Fauci testifies, discusses students returning in August MORE (D-Wash.) forced Senate Republicans to vote on Paul’s plan through an amendment she offered, which failed on a 40-59 vote.

GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP faces internal conflicts on fifth coronavirus bill The other dangerous virus infecting our country The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Surgeon General stresses need to invest much more in public health infrastructure, during and after COVID-19; Fauci hopeful vaccine could be deployed in December MORE (Maine), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (Nev.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeWhite House withdraws ATF nominee after GOP pushback Hillicon Valley: Commerce announces new Huawei restrictions | Russian meddling report round five | Google's ad business in spotlight Justice Department signals opposition to Senate's surveillance bill MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Congress headed toward unemployment showdown Doctors push Trump to quickly reopen country in letter organized by conservatives MORE (Ky.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzState Department scrutiny threatens Pompeo's political ambitions 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic Parties gear up for battle over Texas state House MORE (Texas) voted with Democrats against Ryan's plan. Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOverwhelming majority of publicly traded firms have not returned small-business loans: review GOP faces internal conflicts on fifth coronavirus bill COVID-19 makes Trump's work with black Americans that much harder MORE (R-Fla.), a prospective 2016 GOP presidential nominee, voted for Ryan's budget.

"Enough is enough. Republicans received a vote on their extreme proposal; now that it has failed once more, it's time for Republicans to work with Democrats to enact a budget that reflects our values of fairness and opportunity for all," House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said after the vote.

Ahead of the vote, Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGOP faces internal conflicts on fifth coronavirus bill On The Money: Jobless rate exceeds 20 percent in three states | Senate goes on break without passing small business loan fix | Biden pledges to not raise taxes on those making under 0K Senate leaves for break without passing Paycheck Protection Program fix MORE (R-S.D.) urged his colleagues to support Ryan's budget.

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"The House Republican budget does something the Democrats' doesn’t do, it actually balances," Thune said. "If you look at the House Republican budget, it’s focused on growing the economy, not the government." 

Ryan’s budget passed in the House Thursday morning on a 221-207 vote. His plan would reform the tax code in order to pay for a tax rate deduction, among other things. Ryan would reduce the top tax rate to 25 percent — a reduction of more than 10 percentage points. 

Democrats have said that Ryan would have to raise taxes on the middle class by ending tax deductions that benefit families in order to pay for tax cuts to the wealthiest.

"Our budget uses new revenue from the wealthiest Americans and biggest corporations for deficit reduction, and for investments that support our economy and strengthen our middle class," Murray said. “But the House Republican budget would do the opposite."

Murray’s budget includes $100 billion in stimulus funding that she says would help boost economic growth and workforce training. Her plan has come under heavy fire from Republicans who say it over-estimates the extent to which it would reduce the deficit, and it raises nearly $1 trillion in new taxes. Democrats say their budget cuts the deficit by $1.85 trillion over 10 years through an equal amount of spending cuts and new revenue, but the GOP has said that because it assumes the sequester will not happen, the amount of deficit reduction is closer to $700 billion.

Murray said Americans prefer her "balanced" approach over Ryan's "unbalanced" plan because her plan includes revenue and spending cuts. She added that the public rejected Ryan's budget ideas in the November election.

"Americans want to see a budget that puts the middle class first, and asks the wealthiest Americans and biggest corporations to do their fair share towards deficit reduction," Murray said. “Unfortunately, rather than meeting the clear demands of the vast majority of the American people, House Republicans put forward a budget last week that doubles down on that rejected ideology."

Ryan balances the budget over 10 years with $5.7 trillion in projected spending cuts. Democrats have criticized his plan for "gutting" programs that benefit the middle class and turn Medicare into a voucher system.

Sen. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowBipartisan senators introduce bill to make changes to the Paycheck Protection Program Democrats press USDA on worker safety at meat processing plants Michigan Republican Senate candidate notes places 'I disagree with' Trump MORE (D-Mich.) offered an amendment that would prevent Medicare from becoming a voucher program. Her amendment received a 96-3 vote.

Cruz, Lee and Paul voted against Stabenow's amendment.

“I am proud that the Senate Budget preserves and protects Medicare for seniors today and in the future," Murray said. “Medicare is vital to the health and well being of more than 50 million seniors and Americans with disabilities."

The Senate reached a deal to hold five amendment votes Thursday night and will vote on six more amendments Friday morning at 11 a.m., while the 50 hours of required debate continues. Debate time could be yielded back in order to start the "vote-a-rama" on an unlimited number of germane amendments before 7 p.m. Friday.

—This article was updated at 9:38 p.m. to include Rep. Nancy Pelosi's (D-Calif.) statement.