Murphy said he thought the public should know about these victims since there will be more unless Congress acts to prevent more gun violence. He returned to the floor several times througout the day to continue talking about vicitms.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I’ll be back today and tomorrow to talk about more victims,” Murphy said before leaving the floor after talking for more than an hour. “I just think we need to tell their stories. People need to know who they are because there are going to be more of them if we don’t do something.”

The Senate is considering S.649, the Safe Communities, Safe Schools Act, which would expand background checks on gun purchases, create new penalties on straw purchases and include new funding for school security. 

The bill doesn’t include an assault weapons ban or limits on magazine clip capacity — although Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidLobbying World Mitch McConnell is not invincible Seven big decisions facing Biden in 2020 primary MORE (D-Nev.) promised to allow a vote on those provisions as an amendment.  A procedurla motion to formally begin debate on the legislation is set for Thursday.

Murphy spoke on the floor earlier Wednesday, urging his colleagues to support the gun-control reforms being proposed.

“If we had stronger laws on the books, Newtown might not have happened today,” Murphy said.

Murphy pointed out that the gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary shot off more than 150 bullets in 10 minutes and five children were able to escape while he stopped to reload. One proposed amendment would limit ammunitions clips to 10 bullets.

“I think we would have more children alive today if we had ammunitions clips of 10,” Murphy said.

Families of the Newtown victims have been visiting the offices of senators this week urging them to support gun-control.

A group of GOP senators, lead by Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeBolton emerges as flashpoint in GOP debate on Iran Frustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran Congress can expand paid leave and help workers save with bipartisan support MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulBolton emerges as flashpoint in GOP debate on Iran US ambassador to Germany ruffles State Department with budget stand Overnight Defense: Congressional leaders receive classified briefing on Iran | Trump on war: 'I hope not' | Key Republican calls threats credible | Warren plan targets corporate influence at Pentagon MORE (Ky.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz Eye-popping number of Dems: I can beat Trump 'SleepyCreepy Joe' and 'Crazy Bernie': Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Restrictive state abortion laws ignite fiery 2020 debate MORE (Texas), have threatened to filibuster any gun-control reforms, requiring a 60-vote threshold, because they say it would violate Second Amendment rights. They argue that the gun-control measures proposed by Democrats wouldn't have prevented the Newtown shooting.

“Seems like somewhat of a disservice is being done to these families," Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeOvernight Defense — Presented by Huntington Ingalls Industries — Trump nominates Shanahan as Pentagon chief | House panel advances bill to block military funds for border wall | Trump defends Bolton despite differences Trump nominates Shanahan as Pentagon chief Iran, Venezuela puts spotlight on Trump adviser John Bolton MORE (R-Okla.) said. "It’s almost like we’re looking at legislation that would have stopped something like this from happening. … Maybe I’m looking at it too simplistically.”

This article was updated at 2:20 p.m. and 3:50 p.m.