The Senate voted 74-20 on Monday to end debate on proceeding to a bill that would allow states to collect online sales tax.

The Marketplace Fairness Act, S. 743, would empower states to collect taxes on purchases made online by consumers in their states. 

The strong vote to end debate suggests supporters of the bill are likely to see it win approval in the Senate this week. Its path through the House, despite the support of many GOP governors, is less clear.

Senators in states without a sales tax voiced opposition to the bill Monday, arguing it would burden retailers in their states by forcing them to collect taxes for other state governments.

“I strongly oppose this measure because it would put a serious burden on small businesses that rely on the Internet to tap into growing markets, expand their operations, and create jobs,” Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenBrunson release spotlights the rot in Turkish politics and judiciary Overnight Defense — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — Missing journalist strains US-Saudi ties | Senators push Trump to open investigation | Trump speaks with Saudi officials | New questions over support for Saudi coalition in Yemen Senators demand answers on Trump administration backing of Saudi coalition in Yemen MORE (D-N.H.) said Monday. “Mandating that small businesses collect sales taxes for an additional 46 states and 9,600 tax jurisdictions would overload these entities with bureaucracy and red tape.”

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The bill would exempt small businesses that earn less than $1 million annually from out-of-state sales. 

Under current law, states can only collect sales taxes from retailers that have a physical presence in their state. People who order items online from another state are supposed to declare the purchases on their tax forms, but few do or are even aware of the law.

“It’s only fair to the businesses across America, if they are required to collect sales tax on their sales, that those competing with them ought to do the same,” Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenate Dems ask Trump to disclose financial ties to Saudi Arabia Trump officials ratchet up drug pricing fight GOP senators: Mnuchin should not go to Saudi Arabia MORE (D-Ill.) said ahead of the vote Monday. Durbin is a leading co-sponsor of the bill.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusOvernight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms Congress gives McCain the highest honor Judge boots Green Party from Montana ballot in boost to Tester MORE (D-Mont.) said the bill should have gone through committee before coming to the Senate floor, but last week Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidFive takeaways from testy Heller-Rosen debate in Nevada Major overhauls needed to ensure a violent revolution remains fictional Senate heads home to campaign after deal on Trump nominees MORE (D-Nev.) decided to call up the bill anyway.

“This bill is not ready for debate on the Senate floor,” Baucus said. “It forces our small businesses to be tax collectors for other states.

“And who is policing all of this? The bill as written today, has no audit or enforcement protection.”

Those supporting the bill have called it a “states’ rights bill” because it would allow states — many of which are battling large budget deficits — to collect the revenue they need to fund state programs.

“Right now, it’s not only unfair to small businesses, but it’s costing states and localities millions in tax revenue,” said Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziOvernight Energy — Presented by Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance — Judge upholds Obama's marine monument | GOP lawmakers worried states using water rule to block fossil fuels | Lawmakers press Trump ahead of ethanol decision GOP senators ask EPA to block states that have 'hijacked' rule to stop fossil fuel production Cruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke MORE (R-Wyo.), the lead sponsor of the bill.

The Senate last month passed a non-binding budget resolution on a 75-24 vote supporting the Marketplace Fairness language. That strong bipartisan vote showed there is enough support to pass the bill. 

Most opposition to the bill has come from conservative GOP members joined by lawmakers from three states that don’t have sales tax: Montana, New Hampshire and Oregon. Delaware also doesn’t have a sales tax, but their senators didn’t oppose the bill.

Retail groups such as the National Retail Federation and the Retail Industry Leaders Association have backed the legislation, which senators have been pushing for years.

Reps. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackBudget chairs press appropriators on veterans spending Senate chairman urges move to two-year budgetary process On The Money: Senate passes first 2019 spending bill | Trump hits Harley-Davidson in tariffs fight | Mnuchin rips report of investment restrictions | Justices side with American Express in antitrust case MORE (R-Ark.), Jackie Speier (D-Calif.), Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchDems damp down hopes for climate change agenda Electric carmakers turn to Congress as tax credits dry up One Vermont Republican wins statewide nomination in six races MORE (D-Vt.) and John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) have introduced companion legislation in the House.