“Internet retailers have an advantage over brick and mortar retailers,” Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinElection security bills face GOP buzzsaw Election security bills face GOP buzzsaw The Hill's Morning Report - Trump and House Democrats resume battle MORE (D-Ill.) said Wednesday. “This has caused many stores on Main Streets to face competition that is unfair … so we’re trying to level the playing field.”

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Senators in states without a sales tax voiced opposition to the bill, arguing it would burden retailers in their states by forcing them to collect taxes for other state governments.

“This legislation would impose new burdens on small businesses not only in New Hampshire but actually across the country,” Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenDesign leaks for Harriet Tubman bill after Mnuchin announces delay Design leaks for Harriet Tubman bill after Mnuchin announces delay Bipartisan senators push new bill to improve foreign lobbying disclosures MORE (D-N.H.) said. “Small businesses across the country — not just in non-sales tax states, such as New Hampshire, but small businesses across the country — will see their tax burdens increase.”

The bill would exempt small businesses that earn less than $1 million annually from out-of-state sales and requires states to provide retailers with software to calculate sales taxes based on a buyer’s zip code.

Under current law, states can only collect sales taxes from retailers that have a physical presence in their state. People who order items online from another state are supposed to declare the purchases on their tax forms, but few do or are even aware of the law.

“This issue has grown tremendously because of the explosion of Internet sales," Sen. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampLobbying World Pro-trade group targets Democratic leadership in push for new NAFTA On The Money: Stocks sink on Trump tariff threat | GOP caught off guard by new trade turmoil | Federal deficit grew 38 percent this fiscal year | Banks avoid taking position in Trump, Dem subpoena fight MORE (D-N.D.) said Tuesday. "Remote sellers are getting bigger, and our main street businesses continue to suffer, continue to struggle.

“Let's do this. Let's level the playing field. Let's make this responsive to those main street businesses who everyday struggle and are simply asking for justice."

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusOvernight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms Congress gives McCain the highest honor Judge boots Green Party from Montana ballot in boost to Tester MORE (D-Mont.) and others who opposed the bill said it should have gone through committee before coming to the Senate floor.

“This is a bill that — once again, as happens all-to-often in this Senate — hasn’t been run through committee, hasn’t been properly vetted, and hasn’t yet had the kinks worked out of it,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellElection security bills face GOP buzzsaw Election security bills face GOP buzzsaw Overnight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale MORE (R-Ky.) said Tuesday. “It’s not like there aren’t other things that can be done to improve tax compliance from online shoppers — things that don’t require us to turn private businesses into tax collectors for remote state governments.”

Those supporting the bill have called it a “states’ rights bill” because it would allow states — many of which are battling large budget deficits — to collect the revenue they need to fund state programs.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTrump weighs in on UFOs in Stephanopoulos interview Trump weighs in on UFOs in Stephanopoulos interview Impeachment will reelect Trump MORE (D-Nev.) warned senators Wednesday that there could be weekend work if the opposition continues to drag its feet.

“I know this sounds like me crying wolf, but this might be the time the wolf is coming,” Reid said. “If we have to be here Friday, Saturday, we’ve got to finish work on this bill.”

Most opposition to the bill has come from conservative GOP members joined by lawmakers from three states that don’t have sales tax: Montana, New Hampshire and Oregon. Delaware also doesn’t have a sales tax, but its senators didn’t oppose the bill.

Retail groups such as the National Retail Federation and the Retail Industry Leaders Association have backed the legislation, which senators have been pushing for years.

Reps. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackTrump throws support behind 'no brainer' measure to ban burning of American flag Trump throws support behind 'no brainer' measure to ban burning of American flag CBO: Medicare for All gives 'many more' coverage but 'potentially disruptive' MORE (R-Ark.), Jackie Speier (D-Calif.), Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchHillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data Lawmakers grapple with deepfake threat at hearing Lawmakers grapple with deepfake threat at hearing MORE (D-Vt.) and John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) have introduced companion legislation in the House.