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Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkOn the Trail: Senate GOP hopefuls tie themselves to Trump Biden campaign releases video to explain 'what really happened in Ukraine' Why Republicans are afraid to call a key witness in the impeachment inquiry MORE (R-Ill.) voted against Coburn's amendment, while Democratic Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganCoronavirus poses risks for Trump in 2020 GOP braces for Democratic spending onslaught in battle for Senate Democrats will win back the Senate majority in 2020, all thanks to President Trump MORE (N.C.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn Heitkamp70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents Susan Collins set to play pivotal role in impeachment drama Pro-trade group launches media buy as Trump and Democrats near deal on new NAFTA MORE (N.D.), Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBaucus backing Biden's 2020 bid Bottom line Overnight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms MORE (Mont.), Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon Donnelly70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents Ginsburg health scare raises prospect of election year Supreme Court battle Watchdog accuses pro-Kavanaugh group of sending illegal robotexts in 2018 MORE (Ind.), Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorCoronavirus poses risks for Trump in 2020 Tom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 MORE (Ark.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska political mess has legislators divided over meeting place Former GOP chairman Royce joins lobbying shop Lobbying world MORE (Alaska), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterDemocratic senator: 'The ultimate of ironies' for Trump to hit Romney for invoking his faith Committee on Veterans Affairs sends important message during tense Senate time Democrats cry foul over Schiff backlash MORE (Mont.), Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichSenate report says Obama officials were 'not well-postured' to respond to Russian hacking Democratic senators ask banks to prohibit funding Arctic drilling Senate drama surrounding Trump trial starts to fizzle MORE (N.M.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinThe Hill's Morning Report - Sanders takes incoming during intense SC debate Republicans root for Sanders nomination in battle for House Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Lawmakers raise alarms over Trump coronavirus response | Top official warns virus appears inevitable in US | Democrats block two Senate abortion bills MORE (W.Va.), Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuA decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth Congress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face Dems wrestle over how to vote on ‘Green New Deal’ MORE (La.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOvernight Health Care: Appeals court strikes down Medicaid work requirements | Pelosi's staff huddles with aides on surprise billing | Senate Dems pressure Trump to drop ObamaCare lawsuit Senate Democrats pressure Trump to drop ObamaCare lawsuit Trump under pressure to renew last nuke treaty with Russia MORE (N.H.) and Independent Sen. Angus KingAngus KingOcasio-Cortez defends Sanders running as a Democrat: It's 'more than what you call yourself' Use of voting tabulation apps raise red flags on Capitol Hill Patrick Dempsey to star in pilot for CBS political drama 'Ways and Means' MORE (Maine) voted for the measure.

Coburn said the Corp of Engineers projects are the most visited of federal agencies’ sites. He said his amendment would simply make the Corp recognize states’ conceal and carry gun laws, which is the case in national parks and forests.

“Why should we not have the same policy everywhere,” Coburn said. “Why would we do something different for the Corps’ land? … It’s common sense to have a consistent law on all federal lands.”

Coburn said the number of rapes and other crimes in national parks were reduced once guns were allowed.

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairwoman Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerFormer Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer joins DC lobbying firm Hillicon Valley: Ocasio-Cortez clashes with former Dem senator over gig worker bill | Software engineer indicted over Capital One breach | Lawmakers push Amazon to remove unsafe products Ocasio-Cortez blasts former Dem senator for helping Lyft fight gig worker bill MORE (D-Calif.) said she didn’t understand why Republicans would want to take more votes on the controversial issue of guns, adding that she hoped all other amendments to her bill, S. 601, would be germane.

“I just want to lay it out here for the American people; this is a public works bill dealing with water infrastructure. … It is not a bill about guns,” Boxer said ahead of the amendment votes. “I hope we can avert and avoid so much controversy with this bill.”

Boxer also argued that guns are already allowed on Army Corp property as long as they are for hunting and target shooting. She said she didn’t support Coburn’s amendment because “it’s a public safety issue” for the Corp because it “has no employees that perform law enforcement duties” or carry weapons.

She and ranking member David VitterDavid Bruce VitterThe biggest political upsets of the decade Red-state governor races put both parties on edge Louisiana Republicans score big legislative wins MORE (R-La.) introduced the water bill, which passed unanimously out of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee in March.

“I too am very supportive of this bill, which I do think is a bipartisan reform-oriented effort,” Vitter said. “It is an important jobs, water way infrastructure bill.”

Boxer said the bill would support more than 500,000 U.S. jobs.

The Senate also voted 68-31 for an amendment from Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseThe Hill's Morning Report - Can Sanders be stopped? Democratic senators ask DOJ watchdog to expand Giuliani probe Democrats pan Trump's budget proposal as 'dead on arrival' MORE (D-R.I.). His amendment would create a national endowment for the oceans to promote the protection and conservation of U.S. ocean; coastal; and Great Lakes ecosystems, although funding the trust would be decided later so that the amendment wouldn't add funding to the underlying bill.

The Senate is expected to continue work on the bipartisan water bill through the week.

This article was updated at 2:45 p.m. to include the vote on Whitehouse's amendment.