Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairwoman Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerBottom line Trump administration halting imports of cotton, tomatoes from Uighur region of China Biden inaugural committee to refund former senator's donation due to foreign agent status MORE (D-Calif.) and ranking member David VitterDavid Bruce VitterBiden inaugural committee to refund former senator's donation due to foreign agent status Bottom line Lysol, Charmin keep new consumer brand group lobbyist busy during pandemic MORE (R-La.) introduced the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA). S. 601 would authorize Army Corp of Engineer projects related to flood and storm risk reduction, coast and inland navigation, and ecosystem restoration.

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The Senate rejected an amendment from Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSunday shows preview: Democrats eye passage of infrastructure bill; health experts warn of fourth coronavirus wave Lack of cyber funds in Biden infrastructure plan raises eyebrows As Congress considers infrastructure, don't forget rural America MORE (R-Wyo.) that would have stopped the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from expanding what can be identified as waters protected under the Clean Water Act. His amendment failed on a 52-44 vote — there was a 60-vote threshold for final passage.

Democratic Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganBiden's gun control push poses danger for midterms The two women who could 'cancel' Trump 10 under-the-radar races to watch in November MORE (N.C.), Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorBottom line Everybody wants Joe Manchin Cotton glides to reelection in Arkansas MORE (Ark.), Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyEverybody wants Joe Manchin Centrist Democrats pose major problem for progressives Biden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big MORE (Ind.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampBill Maher blasts removal of journalist at Teen Vogue Centrist Democrats pose major problem for progressives Harrison seen as front-runner to take over DNC at crucial moment MORE (N.D.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska Senate race sees cash surge in final stretch Alaska group backing independent candidate appears linked to Democrats Sullivan wins Alaska Senate GOP primary MORE (Alaska), Joe ManchinJoe ManchinFive hurdles Democrats face to pass an infrastructure bill Nixed Interior nominee appointed to different department role  Against mounting odds, Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan MORE (W.Va.), Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCassidy wins reelection in Louisiana Bottom line A decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth MORE (La.) and Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden tasks Harris on border; news conference today Missouri Senate candidate Eric Greitens tangles with Hugh Hewitt in testy interview The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality MORE (Mo.) voted with Republicans for Barrasso's amendment.

Barrasso said his amendment would have protected farmers and ranchers from the EPA, which has said it is considering holding more U.S. water bodies to higher standards under the Clean Water Act. He said the administration’s decision to expand waters to areas of farms would "have a huge impact on farmers and ranchers.”

Boxer urged her colleagues to vote against Barrasso’s amendment, calling it “an anti-environmental rider” to her bill.

“Without protections dangerous pollutants could be put into our water ways,” Boxer said ahead of the vote. “The Barrasso amendment is such an overreach that we will keep the state of U.S. waters in chaos. … Without these protections our drinking water would be at risk.”

An amendment from Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Why does Bernie Sanders want to quash Elon Musk's dreams? Congress can protect sacred Oak Flat in Arizona from mining project MORE (I-Vt.) was also held to a 60-vote threshold. His amendment would have allowed FEMA to fund stronger restoration standards for culverts and bridges in Vermont that were damaged by natural disasters. He said the goal was to prevent the structures from being damaged again. His amendment failed on a 56-40 vote.

Republican Sens. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Bottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (Miss.), Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - Biden, lawmakers start down a road with infrastructure OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan | House GOP's planned environmental bills drop Democratic priorities | Advocates optimistic Biden infrastructure plan is a step toward sustainability On The Money: Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan | Democrats debate tax hikes on wealthy | Biden, Congress target semiconductor shortage MORE (Miss.), David Vitter (La.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate GOP signal they won't filibuster debate of hate crimes bill Democrats work to pick up GOP support on anti-Asian hate crimes bill Against mounting odds, Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan MORE (Maine) voted with Democrats for the Sanders amendment.

Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnConservative group escalates earmarks war by infiltrating trainings Democrats step up hardball tactics in Supreme Court fight COVID response shows a way forward on private gun sale checks MORE (R-Okla.) said Sanders' amendment was "essentially an earmark" for his state.

The Senate accepted an amendment from Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeBiden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Biden defense budget criticized by Republicans, progressives alike Sanders expresses 'serious concerns' with Biden's defense increase MORE (R-Okla.) addressing federal land use in Oklahoma. His amendment passed by voice-vote.

Earlier Tuesday, the Senate approved 20 minor amendments en bloc.