Inhofe’s amendment would have repealed the nutrition entitlement programs and established a nutrition assistance block grant program for states instead. He said his amendment would allow the Senate to separate the supplemental nutrition assistance program (SNAP), also known as food stamps, from the farm bill.

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“My amendment would allow us to vote on a farm bill rather than a charity bill,” Inhofe said ahead of the vote.

The Senate is considering a $955 billion five-year farm bill and is expecting to continue amendment work through the week.

S. 954 would cut more than $23 billion from current spending levels over 10 years, including $4 billion worth of cuts to food stamps, which has led to some Democratic opposition.

Inhofe complained that a $4 billion cut wasn’t enough, adding that the farm bill should be about farms rather than a “charity program.”

Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowEnergy chief touts electric vehicle funding in Senate plan Senate passes bill to award Congressional Gold Medal to first Black NHL player The glass ceiling that diverse Senate staff still face MORE (D-Mich.) urged senators to oppose Inhofe’s amendment because it would cap the supplemental nutrition at half the current levels.

“I rise in strong opposition to block granting and cutting the food assistance program,” Stabenow said. “We have a value system that says we’re going to make sure when families are hit on hard times to no fault of their own, that they’re not going to starve. … I think that’s the best about us.”

She also said that block grants wouldn’t guarantee that the states use the funds to feed needy families.

GOP Sens. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonCritical race theory becomes focus of midterms Former Georgia ethics official to challenge McBath Loeffler meets with McConnell amid speculation of another Senate run MORE (Ga.), Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissEffective and profitable climate solutions are within the nation's farms and forests Live coverage: Georgia Senate runoffs Trump, Biden face new head-to-head contest in Georgia MORE (Ala.), John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenSenate votes to take up infrastructure deal GOP senators urge Biden to keep Trump-era border restrictions A plan to address the growing orphaned wells crisis MORE (N.D.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanThe 17 Republicans who voted to advance the Senate infrastructure bill Senate votes to take up infrastructure deal Trump slams Romney, Senate GOP over infrastructure deal MORE (Ohio), Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (Tenn.), Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsBob Dole, Pat Roberts endorse Kansas AG Derek Schmidt for governor Ex-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain MORE (Kan.), Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Bottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (Miss.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe 17 Republicans who voted to advance the Senate infrastructure bill Senate votes to take up infrastructure deal Gyms, hotels, bus companies make last-ditch plea for aid MORE (Maine) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiThe 17 Republicans who voted to advance the Senate infrastructure bill Senate votes to take up infrastructure deal The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Officers give grueling, horrific accounts of Jan. 6 MORE (Alaska) voted with Democrats against the amendment.

After the vote on Inhofe's amendment failed, the Senate unanimously consented to passing an amendment from Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenCould Andrew Cuomo — despite scandals — be re-elected because of Trump? Al Franken to launch 15-stop comedy tour Democrats, GOP face crowded primaries as party leaders lose control MORE (D-Minn.), which would allow grocery delivery services for seniors and people with disabilities on food stamps. An amendment from Sen. David VitterDavid Bruce VitterBiden inaugural committee to refund former senator's donation due to foreign agent status Bottom line Lysol, Charmin keep new consumer brand group lobbyist busy during pandemic MORE (R-La.) was also agreed to. Vitter's amendment would prohibit some convicted felons from receiving food assistance benefits.

The White House has said it supports the Senate farm bill.

The House has a $940 billion farm bill that cuts spending by $39.7 billion over 10 years — $20.5 billion are cuts to food stamps. The House bill likely won’t get a floor vote until June.