The Senate voted 57-43 on Thursday to table an amendment to the immigration reform bill that would have required increased border security before granting temporary legal status for illegal immigrants. [WATCH VIDEO]

The amendment from Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyDem calls for Cohen to testify before Senate panel over explosive report Senate Republicans eye rules change to speed Trump nominees IRS shutdown plan fails to quell worries MORE (R-Iowa) would have prevented the government from granting provisional immigrant status until the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary has maintained effective control of the borders for six months.

Grassley blasted Democrats for burying his proposal, which was the first change to the Gang of Eight's immigration bill to be considered on the Senate floor.

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“This vote proves this ‘open and fair process’ is a farce,” Grassley said. “The majority is afraid of having a true vote on my amendment. … This is not the right way to start off on a very important bill.”

Grassley said the immigration bill repeats the mistakes made in the 1986 overhaul by “legalizing first and securing the border later, if ever.” 

Sens. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.) and Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSenate rejects government-wide ban on abortion funding Centrist efforts to convince Trump to end shutdown falter Bipartisan group of senators will urge Trump to reopen government for 3 weeks MORE (D-W.Va.) were the only Democrats who voted against tabling the amendment.

Republicans senators from the Gang of Eight — Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense: Second Trump-Kim summit planned for next month | Pelosi accuses Trump of leaking Afghanistan trip plans | Pentagon warns of climate threat to bases | Trump faces pressure to reconsider Syria exit Pressure mounts for Trump to reconsider Syria withdrawal Senate Republicans eye rules change to speed Trump nominees MORE (Fla.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump pitches new plan to reopen government amid Dem pushback Democrats signal they'll reject Trump shutdown proposal Dems revive impeachment talk after latest Cohen bombshell MORE (S.C.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainOvernight Defense: Trump unveils new missile defense plan | Dems express alarm | Shutdown hits Day 27 | Trump cancels Pelosi foreign trip | Senators offer bill to prevent NATO withdrawal Bipartisan senators reintroduce bill to prevent Trump from withdrawing from NATO Mark Kelly considering Senate bid as Arizona Dems circle McSally MORE (Ariz.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeSchumer recruiting top-notch candidate for McCain Senate seat The Hill's Morning Report — Trump eyes wall money options as shutdown hits 21 days Poll: Sanders most popular senator, Flake least MORE (Ariz.) — all voted to table Grassley's amendment, along with Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump pitches new plan to reopen government amid Dem pushback The Memo: Concern over shutdown grows in Trump World Kaine to force Senate to hold rare Saturday session amid shutdown MORE (R-Alaska).

Gang of Eight member Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSunday shows preview: Shutdown negotiations continue after White House immigration proposal Trump blasts Pelosi for wanting to leave country during shutdown The Senate should host the State of the Union MORE (D-N.Y.) was among those who urged senators to vote down Grassley’s border security plan.

“It says that the 11 million people living in the shadows cannot even get the provisional status to work and travel until the secretary of Homeland Security says the border is completely secure and we know that will take years,” Schumer said. “The problem is very simple, what do we do for five or six years until the border is fully secure?”

The bipartisan bill from the Gang of Eight, S. 744, would create a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country, toughen border security, create a guest worker program and boost high-skilled immigration.

Some Republicans have complained that the legislation would provide amnesty in 13 years for the nearly 11 million residents in the U.S. illegally before strengthening border enforcement.

The bill already makes permanent legal residence contingent on Homeland Security having 100 percent situational awareness at every segment of the Southern border and a 90 percent apprehension rate of those trying to cross illegally.

But some Republicans have suggested that the bill gives the administrations too much say over whether the border is secure, leaving Congress powerless to stop the amnesty program if security measures aren’t met.

Those supporting the bill say it doesn’t include amnesty since people here illegally would be forced to undergo a background check, pay a fine and back taxes, learn English, and wait in line for a green card. The bill also appropriates an additional $6.5 billion for border security and enforcement measures.

This article was updated at 4:45 p.m.