Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Democrats grill USDA official on relocation plans that gut research staff Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens MORE (D-Vt.) called Vitter's amendment "prohibitively expensive" and urged colleagues to vote against it.

Republican Gang of Eight Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamScarborough sounds alarm on political 'ethnic cleansing' after Trump rally The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants GOP rattled by Trump rally MORE (S.C.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMeghan McCain shares video of father shutting down supporter who called Obama an 'Arab' after Trump rally Graham: Every Republican president or nominee 'will be accused of being a racist' No presidential candidate can unite the country MORE (Ariz.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRepublican lawmakers ask Trump not to delay Pentagon cloud-computing contract Overnight Defense: US shoots down Iranian drone | Pentagon sending 500 more troops to Saudi Arabia | Trump mulls Turkey sanctions | Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract EU official in Canada says he feels 'at home' there because no one was shouting 'send him back' MORE (Fla.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFlake urges Republicans to condemn 'vile and offensive' Trump tweets Flake responds to Trump, Jimmy Carter barbs: 'We need to stop trying to disqualify each other' Jeff Flake responds to Trump's 'greener pastures' dig on former GOP lawmakers MORE (Ariz.) voted against Vitter's amendment, along with GOP Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Overnight Defense: Highlights from Defense pick's confirmation hearing | Esper spars with Warren over ethics | Sidesteps questions on Mattis vs. Trump | Trump says he won't sell F-35s to Turkey Epstein charges show Congress must act to protect children from abuse MORE (Alaska), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp Trump angry more Republicans haven't defended his tweets: report MORE (Maine) and Kelley Ayotte (N.H.). Democratic Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.) voted for the entry-exit system amendment.

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The Senate is expected to continue amendment work on the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act throughout June. The bipartisan group of eight senators, known as the Gang of Eight, introduced S. 744, which would create a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country, toughen border security, create a guest worker program and boost high-skilled immigration.

McCain said Vitter’s amendment could “delay” the immigration process for years. He also pointed out that the underlying bill has entry-exit measures, including the implementation of a system at sea and air ports.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyScandal in Puerto Rico threatens chance at statehood Poll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Democrat: Treasury 'acknowledged the unprecedented process' in Trump tax return rejection MORE (R-Iowa) pointed out that an effective entry-exist system is already suppose to be in place but that previous administrations have “thumbed their noses at the laws on the books.” He added that the Gang of Eight bill weakens this law by saying entry-exit systems need to be in place at only some points of entrance and it doesn’t require it to be a biometric system, which uses finger prints.

“This is a border security issue,” Grassley said of Vitter’s amendment. “It’s a national security issue and without this measure we are not in control of our borders.”

Republicans have warned that some border security amendments have to be adopted in order to gain more GOP support for final passage of the bill.

The Senate voted on other amendments Tuesday afternoon — all were held to a 60-vote threshold for passage.

Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCongress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face Dems wrestle over how to vote on ‘Green New Deal’ Lobbying world MORE’s (D-La.) amendment was the first amendment accepted to the bill. Her amendment passed on by voice-vote and clarifies U.S. international adoption laws to ensure adoptees are granted U.S. citizenship. It would also repeal the pre-adoption parental visitation requirement for automatic citizenship and allow just one parent to visit the country of origin of the adoptee, rather than both adoptive parents.

Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand The Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi looks to squash fight with progressives MORE’s (D-Mont.) amendment received a 94-0 vote. It expands the new Border Oversight Task Force to include tribal members so they can make border security recommendations relating to Native American tribes on the Northern and Southern border.

Earlier Tuesday, the Senate rejected an amendment from Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGOP rattled by Trump rally GOP wants commitment that Trump will sign budget deal Poll: McConnell is most unpopular senator MORE (R-S.D.), which would have required the construction of more border fencing before illegal immigrants were given provisional legal status.