McConnell reelected Senate majority leader
© Greg Nash
 
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The Kentucky Republican on Wednesday was reelected the GOP leader "by acclimation by his colleagues with a standing ovation,” McConnell spokesman Don Stewart said.

Stewart said the decision was unanimous.

“It’s an honor to once again have been chosen by my colleagues to continue serving as their leader,” McConnell said. "We are eager to work with House Republicans and President-elect Trump to bring the national and economic security our nation is asking for.”

McConnell was nominated and seconded by Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioAnother VPOTUS tries for POTUS: What does history tell us? Tensions swirl around Iran as administration to brief Congress Tensions swirl around Iran as administration to brief Congress MORE (R-Fla.) and Sen.-elect Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungBipartisan senators unveil measure to end surprise medical bills Pence, McConnell eulogize Sen. Richard Lugar On The Money: GOP angst grows over Trump's trade war | Trump promises help for 'Patriot Farmers' | Markets rebound | CBO founding director Alice Rivlin dies | Senate to vote on disaster aid bill next week MORE (R-Ind.).

He was widely expected to keep the top GOP spot, with no senator publicly mulling a challenge.

Republicans also chose Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSenate Republicans running away from Alabama abortion law Frustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran Graham: Trump officials not adequately briefing on Iran threat MORE (R-Colo.) to take over the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC.).

Gardner is replacing Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerMomentum grows to create 'Do Not Track' registry Senate Republicans running away from Alabama abortion law Hillicon Valley: Trump takes flak for not joining anti-extremism pact | Phone carriers largely end sharing of location data | Huawei pushes back on ban | Florida lawmakers demand to learn counties hacked by Russians | Feds bust 0M cybercrime group MORE (R-Miss.) as NRSC chairman. He'll be working with a favorable 2018 map, with Republicans expected to play offense as Democrats defend seats in red states.

Aside from the NRSC switch, Senate Republicans left their leadership team intact for 2017.

They reelected Sen. John CornynJohn CornynCollins offering bill to boost battery research as GOP pushes energy 'innovation' Hillicon Valley: Google delays cutting off Huawei | GOP senators split over breaking up big tech | Report finds DNC lagging behind RNC on cybersecurity Trump officials say US efforts to deter Iran have worked MORE (Texas) as Senate Republican whip,  Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneOn The Money: Congress, White House aim to include debt limit increase in spending deal | McConnell optimistic budget deal near | Carson defends HUD eviction plan | Senate votes to undo tax hike on Gold Star families Congress, White House indicate debt limit increase will be part of spending deal Hillicon Valley: Trump takes flak for not joining anti-extremism pact | Phone carriers largely end sharing of location data | Huawei pushes back on ban | Florida lawmakers demand to learn counties hacked by Russians | Feds bust 0M cybercrime group MORE (S.D.) as Senate Republican Conference chairman, Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoTrump boxed in on trade Export-Import Bank back to full strength after Senate confirmations Mike Enzi announces he'll retire from Senate after 2020 MORE (Wyo.) as Senate Republican Policy Committee chairman, and Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntHillicon Valley: Trump takes flak for not joining anti-extremism pact | Phone carriers largely end sharing of location data | Huawei pushes back on ban | Florida lawmakers demand to learn counties hacked by Russians | Feds bust 0M cybercrime group Top Republican says Senate unlikely to vote on any election security bills San Francisco becomes first city to ban facial recognition technology MORE (Mo.) as Senate Republican Conference vice chairman. 

- Updated at 11:34 a.m.