Senators move to protect 'Dreamers'
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A bipartisan pair of senators is filing legislation that would extend legal status for undocumented immigrants brought into the country as children. 
 
Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenators introduce Trump-backed criminal justice bill Grassley: McConnell owes me for judicial nominations Trump throws support behind criminal justice bill MORE (D-Ill.) and Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: Trump’s new AG has ‘concerns’ about criminal justice bill Overnight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — Border deployment 'peaked' at 5,800 troops | Trump sanctions 17 Saudis over Khashoggi killing | Senators offer bill to press Trump on Saudis | Paul effort to block Bahrain arms sale fails Senators introduce Trump-backed criminal justice bill MORE (R-S.C.) rolled out legislation on Friday to try to provide an assurance to such people in case President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpAvenatti ‘still considering’ presidential run despite domestic violence arrest Mulvaney positioning himself to be Commerce Secretary: report Kasich: Wouldn’t want presidential run to ‘diminish my voice’ MORE nixes the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.
 
They're calling it the Bar Removal of Individuals who Dream and Grow Our Economy Act, or BRIDGE Act.
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"This is an effort by Sen. Graham and myself to have a bipartisan answer to the question about what happens to these 800,000 and others like them while we debate the future of immigration," Durbin said. 

He added that hundreds of thousands of immigrants have a "concern and a fear" about what will happen to them if Trump roles back Obama's executive action. 

In addition to Durbin and Graham, Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiDems slam Trump’s energy regulator nominee Ernst elected to Senate GOP leadership Earmarks look to be making a comeback MORE (R-Alaska), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTop Dems: DOJ position on Whitaker appointment 'fatally flawed' Congress needs to wake up to nuclear security threat Democrats in murky legal water with Whitaker lawsuits MORE (D-Calif.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeMcCain would have said ‘enough’ to acrimony in midterms, says Cindy McCain Senate GOP discussing Mueller vote Trump rightly fears the Fed will smother the economy MORE (R-Ariz.) are backing the bill. 

The DACA program — which has faced a lengthy legal battle — provides people living in the U.S. illegally who arrived as children with work authorization and a temporary halt on deportation if they meet certain requirements.

The legislation would allow undocumented immigrants who are eligible for DACA to apply for "provisional protected status" if they pay a fine and undergo a background check. 

The law would sunset after three years. 

"If you have DACA now you would receive provisional protected status until your DACA expires and you can apply for an extension," Durbin said. 

The legislation won't pass the Senate this year, with lawmakers expected to leave town as soon as Friday. Durbin indicated Friday they would reintroduce the bill early next year. 

Graham announced late last month that he was working on the bill with Durbin, arguing it would buy "Dreamers" time as lawmakers try to pass a broader comprehensive immigration bill. 

"If he repeals it then we ought to immediately pass legislation to extend their legal status. I'm willing to do that," he said. "I'm going to support legislation that will continue legal status for these kids until we can find a fix to the overall program." 
 
He added separately that the fight over the undocumented immigrants is a "very defining moment about who we are as a party."

Graham urged Trump to back the bill on Friday, arguing it would help pave the way to provide legal status through "the proper constitutional process." 

The legislation comes as Trump appeared to soften his immigration stance this week, pledging to "work something out."

“They got brought here at a very young age, they’ve worked here, they’ve gone to school here. Some were good students. Some have wonderful jobs. And they’re in never-never land because they don’t know what’s going to happen," he told Time magazine

Trump came under fire during the campaign for taking a hard-line on immigration, pledging to deport roughly 11 million undocumented immigrants. He's walked that back since, noting he would focus primarily on those with criminal records. 

Friday's legislation was quickly endorsed by outside groups. 

Frank Sharry, the executive director of America’s Voice, called the bill an "important step." 

"It is not the broad reform that the country needs and that the American people support, but it would at least avert the disruption and heartbreak that would accompany a revocation of DACA," he said. 
 
Ali Noorani, the executive director of the National Immigration Forum, echoed Sharry's remarks adding that the bill is "one piece of a much larger puzzle." 
 
"We hope to work with the Trump administration and the 115th Congress to address the immigration system broadly so that it benefits all American workers, including immigrants," he said.

It's unclear if, or when, the Graham-Durbin bill could be taken up next year. 

Asked about moving DACA legislation next year, Sen. John CornynJohn CornynCongress should ban life without parole sentences for children  Senate GOP discussing Mueller vote Grassley: McConnell owes me for judicial nominations MORE (R-Texas) told reporters Thursday that it was a "question of sequence" and that it should come after border security. 

"But I don't think [Trump is] interested in hurting the children who came with their parents," he said. "They're not culpable of anything. I think there needs be a reasonable way to deal with, and I think he's indicated he's open to that." 

House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanDemocrat Katie Porter unseats GOP's Mimi Walters Amazon fleeced New York, Virginia with HQ2 picks The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — House, Senate leaders named as Pelosi lobbies for support to be Speaker MORE (R-Wis.) added separately that Republicans won't "pull the rug out from under” undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children.